BishopArts_02 A majestic house nearby. photography by Josh Martin

The Bishop Arts District is small, but it packs a lot in a mere .683 miles. In the last few years, the area has gone from well-kept secret to an entertainment destination for folks coming all the way from Frisco. Many a date night is spent at places such as Tillman’s Roadhouse and Hattie’s. Originally a warehouse district where artists painted and stored art along Bishop Avenue, this little Oak Cliff jewel is rich with history—it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.

Population: 6,913

Location: North Oak Cliff, south of downtown

Average home price (2008): $145,202

Average lot size: 50 by 150 feet

Where to go: There are more than 50 merchants in the area. Eat at Chan Thai, Eno’s Pizza, Zen Sushi, Tillman’s Roadhouse, and more. Shop at Artisans Collective and the Bishop Street Market, which in addition to having a great selection of cards and gifts is also the neighborhood’s longest-running business.

Why Bishop Arts: Located only about 5 minutes from downtown Dallas, the Bishop Arts District is a quaint respite from big-city headaches. There are very few areas where you can ditch the car and walk to a variety of locally owned specialty shops, high-profile restaurants, and art galleries without breaking a sweat. (Okay, in summer, no matter how short the walk, you will break a sweat.) “The Bishop Arts District is one of Oak Cliff's strongest anchors, “ says Keith Cox, a Dallas real estate agent who sells homes in Oak Cliff. “Its pulse comes from galleries, restaurants, shops, services, as well as its residents. The area offers everything from casual to chic.” And although this area is up-and-coming, people really aspire to be a part of this community. Homes in the area range from Prairie Style to Tudor and Craftsman. And what they could use in TLC, they make up for in quality, charm, and character. Even better: the price might be just right. Cox says his buyers want to get in now before word spreads. Think Baby Bluffview seven years ago, says Cox, only better. What about crime? Homeowner Tracy Popken says, “I tell people that living in North Oak Cliff is no more dangerous than living in a diverse urban area like New York or Los Angeles.” As with anything, she advises using common sense. Still, she says that she feels very safe because neighbors look out for one another—moreso than the suburbs even. “I walk and ride my bike alone a lot, and I am more concerned about angry guard dog Chihuahuas than an actual crime being committed against me,” she says.

Words from a local: “It’s one of the few walkable neighborhoods in Dallas where delicious restaurants and quaint shops are all at your doorstep. What’s not to love?” -Oak Cliffer, Tom Caraway

Addresses for sale:
207 S. Willomet Ave.
615 Woodlawn Ave.
617 N. Windomere Ave.