Conceptual renderings of the proposed Dallas stop for a high-speed bullet train connecting to Houston.

Transportation

Texas Bullet Train Developers Share Plans for Dallas Station

Gaze upon these renderings of the Cedars passenger rail station for the proposed Dallas-to-Houston bullet train.

Despite remaining impediments and ongoing public meetings about its still mostly theoretical existence, developers of the long-discussed Dallas-to-Houston high-speed bullet train are rolling along. Monday morning, Texas Central publicized new renderings and details of the train’s Dallas passenger station, which would occupy about 60 acres in the Cedars, just south of the convention center downtown.

Behold, maps.

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

That land is mostly vacant, and conveniently located near DART rail stops at the convention center and in the Cedars. These designs do, of course, cut out space for parking lots. Proponents of the bullet train envision the station as a spur for further development in the already up-and-coming neighborhood. Federal regulators, in an environmental impact statement studying all of the 240-mile Houston-to-Dallas route, compared the potential uptick in development around the station to the transformation of Uptown. This goes along with all the other touted benefits of constructing the infrastructure for a 90-minute trip between Dallas and Houston.

The feds also recently settled on their preferred alignment for the bullet train’s route, if you’d like to envision the rail beyond Dallas. Construction costs of the project have been ballparked around $15 billion, expected to be financed by private investment and potentially federal loans.

Comments

  • Good to see it progressing nicely.

  • tested123

    It is a waste of time to discuss this topic. It will never be built. They don’t have the money. Almost every politician between Dallas and Houston is opposed because almost all landowners between Dallas and Houston are opposed. The business plan is vague ate best. Please ignore these people. This. Will. Not. Happen.

  • david lewis

    wow this is a part of the dallas 2030 plan

  • DubiousBrother

    “Construction costs of the project have been ballparked around $15 billion, expected to be financed by private investment and potentially federal loans.”
    I think that is the first time I have seen government funding mentioned with this project – up until now it has always been “private investment.”