KEEPING UP: A Select Guide to Entertainment in Dallas

Go Forth on the Fourth

For 199 years now, people have been celebrating the Fourth of July. And for almost as many years, they’ve been spending the fifth of July nursing sunburns, scratching bug-bites, and smearing Unguentine on powder burns left by stray firecrackers. This year, we thought you might like a handy guide to some safe, sane and supervised Independence Day activities.

A Dallas Bi-Centennial Celebration, co-sponsored by the Park Central Company and the North Dallas Chamber of Commerce, takes place from 10 a.m. until dark on July 4 and 5 in the 12 acres surrounding the Olla Podrida, 12215 Coit Rd. A parade opens the festival on the Fourth, and groups and individuals-riding clubs, bicycle clubs, Girl and Boy Scout troops, twirlers, bands, veterans’ groups, and so on – are urged to enter. (Entrance forms available from Steve Simmons, 745-2191.) At the end of the parade there will be a flag-raising ceremony and addresses by Congressman Jim Collins and Mayor Wes Wise. Throughout both days, there will be entertainment, such as square dancing, fiddling, barbershop quartets, band concerts, and balloon races. Booths will be provided for artists and craftsmen to display their wares. (Groups interested in performing should contact Steve Simmons, 745-2191, while artists interested in display booths should call Carol Kimberly, 239-8541.) Special activities for children include a petting zoo, midway-type games, sports competitions, pony rides, and horseshoes, kite flying, and relay races. Food concession stands will be available. Admission is $1 for adults; children free if accompanied by an adult, 50¢ if unaccompanied.

Bicycle races-the Second Annual Tour of University Park-will be held at Williams Park, 3800 McFarlin Blvd, from noon to 2 p.m. on the Fourth. Nationally-known junior and senior riders will participate. The event is sponsored by the Dallas Bicycle Racing Club and is held under the sanction of the Amateur Bicycle League of America. Admission is free. For more information, call Paul Brauchle, 638-5921. The event is part of the annual Park Cities festivities, which include an informal parade in the morning featuring an antique (1921-vintage) fire engine.

Stagecoach rides will be among the features of the Oak Cliff Jaycees’ 4th of July celebration at Kiest Park, from noon to midnight. Carnival rides and concessions, American history expositions, arts and crafts displays, and even a free blood-typing unit will be available. The festivities will conclude with a show of $2500 worth of fireworks.

Open House at the Dallas Woman’s Forum, 4607 Ross, will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on July 3, 4, 5, and 6. The building dates from 1906; once the scene of glittering social events, it has been furnished in the style of its original grandeur. Tours will be followed by a short dramatic performance, and tea and coffee will be served by members of the Dallas Woman’s Forum dressed in turn-of-the-century costume. Admission free.

Dallas Bicentennial Airshow, sponsored by the Richardson Jaycees, will be held at Lancaster Airport, Belt Line and Ferris Rd, on July 4, 5, and 6 from 1 to 4 p.m. The event will feature the U. S. Navy Blue Angels, the U. S. Army Silver Eagle Helicopter Team, the U. S. Army Golden Knight Parachute Team, the world champion Red Devils aerobatic team, the Bede 5 Civilian Jet Demonstration Team, and the Walt and Sandi Pierce Wing-Walking Act. Tickets Available from Sears, Preston Ticket Agency, and Sun Rexall Drugstore in Richardson. Adults $3, children 6-12 $2. Mail order accompanied by check should be addressed to Dallas Bicentennial Airshow/Lancaster Airport/Box 551, Lancaster, TX 75146. Block tickets available by calling Phil Matthews, 234-4672, or the Dallas Bicentennial Airshow office, 227-5200.



The rockets’ red glare will be seen over Fair Park on the nights of both the 3rd and the 4th. It’s the largest fireworks display in Texas, and it’s held in the Cotton Bowl. Entertainment starts at 8 p.m. On the 3rd, kids from the recreation programs of the Parks and Recreation Department put on their parade, with decorated bikes, tricycles, little floats, costumes, and so on. Prizes will be awarded just before the parade starts. On both nights, there will be performances by the Harmony and Understanding group from Tyler Junior College, the Gyros Gymnastic Drill Team, and the 4th Marine Air Wing Drum and Bugle Corps from New Orleans. The fireworks go on when it gets really dark.



If you’re making a weekend of it, and happen to be down Austin way, you might drop in on Willie Nelson’s third annual Fourth of July Picnic at Liberty Hill. Entertainment will be provided by Nelson, the Pointer Sisters, Kris Kristof-ferson and Rita Coolidge, the Charlie Daniels Band, Rusty Wier, and lots of others. To get there, take Interstate 35 to Highway 29 near Georgetown, then go west on 29 to Highway 183. Then follow the signs. Tickets are $5.50 at Preston Ticket Agency, 363-9311, or $7.50 at the gate on the day of the picnic.



All listings are subject to late changes after press time. Call ahead to be sure.

Bicentennial Ideas

Our national birthday -the start of our two hundredth year-occurs in only a few weeks. Believing that Dallasites are more energetic than other, and lesser, breeds of Americans, we herein present thirteen unique suggestions for the celebration of the Event in spectacular style. Put away those firecrackers, friends – it’s time to show a little originality!

1. The Bicentennial Personalized CarBally. Fill up your car with 50-cent per gallon gasoline (a penny for every state) anddrive exactly 200 miles. This will put you -depending on which way you choose to exitDallas – exactly 41 miles from Houston,96 miles from Port Arthur or 436 miles fromEl Paso, just to mention a few places youwon’t be when you complete your celebratoryjourney.

2. The SO States Scavenger Party. Inviteyour guests with specific instructions: eachmust bring along an object representing aparticular state. Assign states, so everyone won’t show up with Idaho potatoes.

3. A People From the Original 13 Colonies Party. Invite your friends and tell them to bring someone who was born in, or has lived in, or went to school in one of the original colonies. If a real colonial can’t be found, just about any ole damned Yankee will do.

4. The Great Bicentennial Film Festival

Organize a 50-film festival, one for each of the states, showing Hollywood’s view of the USA. You could show North to Alaska (John Wayne, 1960); Arizona (Jean Arthur, 1940); California (Barbara Stanwyck, 1946); Colorado Territory (Joel McCrea, 1949): A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court (Bing Crosby, 1949); Florida Special (Jack Oakie, 1936); Hawaii, (Julie Andrews, 1966); Abe Lincoln in Illinois (Raymond Massey, 1940); The Kansan (Richard Dix, 1943); Kentucky (Loretta Young, 1933); Louisiana Purchase (Bob Hope, 1941); Maryland (Walter Bren-nan, 1940); The Michigan Kid (Jon Hall, 1947); Mississippi (W. C. Fields, 1935); The Missouri Traveler (Lee Marvin, 1958); Montana (Errol Flynn, 1950); The Nebraskan (Phil Carey, 1953); Nevada (Robert Mit-chum, 1944); New Mexico (Lew Ayres, 1951); New York Confidential (Broderick Crawford, 1955); Carolina Cannonball (Judy Canova, 1955); Dakota (John Wayne, 1945); Oklahoma! (Gordon MacRae, 1955); The Oregon Trail (Fred MacMurray, 1959); Tennessee Johnson (Van Heflin, 1942); Texas (William Holden, 1941); Utah Blaine (Rory Calhoun, 1957); Virginia (Madeleine Carroll, 1941); and Wyoming (Wallace Beery, 1940); With that much help you can do Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin on your own.

5. Bicentennial Dinner Party. You canhave your Revolution and eat it, too. Servea 13-course dinner with each course representing – what else? – one of the colonies orone of their famous cities. For example, youmight begin with Rhode Island Red chicken(Rhode Island was the last colony to ratifythe Constitution) or Virginia ham, followedwith Maryland soft shell crab. For dessert,consider Georgia peaches and Philadelphiacream cheese. Naturally, you would serveNew York State wine and offer cigars madefrom Carolina tobacco. Top it off with Boston cream pie and Texas-size doses of Alka-Seltzer.

6. Namesake’s Street Party. If you live ona street named for one of the 50 states, organize a neighborhood bash and/or garage salearound a theme related to that state. (Residents of Texas Avenue in Oak Cliff are disqualified.)

7. Ail-American Physical Fitness TestCan you walk a block for every state in theunion? How about 200 blocks, one for everyyear of the Republic? No? Well, can you doit on a bike? No? Maybe you’d like to try …

8. Most Frustrating Bicentennial PartyGame. Set a timer for thirty minutes. Handout paper and pencils to your guests. At thesound of the bell, they are to list the fiftystates in the Union. No consultation, hinting,geography books, etc., allowed. Our guess is that by the end of the time limit, nobody will have succeeded and everybody will be ready for a drink. (If, by blind luck, somebody does succeed, let him occupy the remaining time by listing the capitals alongside their respective states.)

9. Least Frustrating Bicentennial PartyGame. Divide your guests into two teams forRevolutionary War charades. Topics mustdeal exclusively with events related to theWar for Independence. Sure, some will beeasy (Betsy Ross sewing the flag, Washington crossing the Delaware, Benedict Arnoldturning his coat). But some might prove atrifle difficult. Try, for example, to enactthe takeover of Fort Ticonderoga, Tom Painewriting Common Sense, or Molly Pitcherleading the troops at the Battle of Mon-mouth.

10. Bicentennial Costume Ball. This isso obvious that we’re a little surprised wehaven’t already received twenty or so invitations from different charities. If you’rethinking it might be fun to try, we suggestone restriction: not everyone can come asGeorge and Martha Washington. Again, werecommend assignments, only we pity thepoor folks who are told to come as WilliamHenry Harrison, Millard Fillmore, Mrs.Ulysees S. Grant, or Barbara Fritchie.

11. Bicentennial Spiritual Exercise. Memorize the entire text of Patrick Henry’sSpeech in Virginia Convention, St. John’sEpiscopal Church, Richmond, 1775. Practiceevery morning beginning on July 4, 1975.Deliver with great fervor at your neighborhood celebration on July 4, 1976. You oughtto be pretty good.

12. Bicentennial Poetry Exercise. Compose an Ode to the Bicentennial in 50 quatrains (for the states), which equals 200 lines(for the yeare), in hypermetrical iambic hexameter, which is 13 syllables (for the colonies).Because the editors firmly believe this to bean admirable, albeit impossible, venture, a$25 cash prize will be awarded to the besteffort received in our offices.

13. One if by land, two if by sea, and threefor the pure rebel hell of it. A BicentennialBeer-Drinking Contest.

Music



Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Free park concerts conclude with performances at Fireside Park on June 15, and on June 18 at a location to be announced. Concerts at 8 p.m. Summer-top, a series of concerts in a tent at Northior riders will participate. The event is sponsored by the Dallas Bicycle Racing Club and is held under the sanction of the Amateur Bicycle League of America. Admission is free. For more information, call Paul Brauchle, 638-5921. The event is part of the annual Park Cities festivities, which include an informal parade in the morning featuring an antique (1921-vintage) fire engine.



Stagecoach rides will be among the features of the Oak Cliff Jaycees’ 4th of July celebration at Kiest Park, from noon to midnight. Carnival rides and concessions, American history expositions, arts and crafts displays, and even a free blood-typing unit will be available. The festivities will conclude with a show of $2500 worth of fireworks.



Open House at the Dallas Woman’s Forum, 4607 Ross, will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on July 3, 4, 5, and 6. The building dates from 1906; once the scene of glittering social events, it has been furnished in the style of its original grandeur. Tours will be followed by a short dramatic performance, and tea and coffee will be served by members of the Dallas Woman’s Forum dressed in turn-of-the-century costume. Admission free.



Dallas Bicentennial Airshow, sponsored by the Richardson Jaycees, will be held at Lancaster Airport, Belt Line and Ferris Rd, on July 4, 5, and 6 from 1 to 4 p.m. The event will feature the U. S. Navy Blue Angels, the U. S. Army Silver Eagle Helicopter Team, the U. S. Army Golden Knight Parachute Team, the world champion Red Devils aerobatic team, the Bede 5 Civilian Jet Demonstration Team, and the Walt and Sandi Pierce Wing-Walking Act. Tickets Available from Sears, Preston Ticket Agency, and Sun Rexall Drugstore in Richardson. Adults $3, children 6-12 $2. Mail order accompanied by check should be addressed to Dallas Bicentennial Airshow/Lancaster Airport/Box 551, Lancaster, TX 75146. Block tickets available by calling Phil Matthews, 234-4672, or the Dallas Bicentennial Airshow office, 227-5200.



The rockets’ red glare will be seen over Fair Park on the nights of both the 3rd and the 4th. It’s the largest fireworks display in Texas, and it’s held in the Cotton Bowl. Entertainment starts at 8 p.m. On the 3rd, kids from the recreation programs of the Parks and Recreation Department put on their parade, with decorated bikes, tricycles, little floats, costumes, and so on. Prizes will be awarded just before the parade starts. On both nights, there will be performances by the Harmony and Understanding group from Tyler Junior College, the Gyros Gymnastic Drill Team, and the 4th Marine Air Wing Drum and Bugle Corps from New Orleans. The fireworks go on when it gets really dark.



If you’re making a weekend of it, and happen to be down Austin way, you might drop in on Willie Nelson’s third annual Fourth of July Picnic at Liberty Hill. Entertainment will be provided by Nelson, the Pointer Sisters, Kris Kristof-ferson and Rita Coolidge, the Charlie Daniels Band, Rusty Wier, and lots of others. To get there, take Interstate 35 to Highway 29 near Georgetown, then go west on 29 to Highway 183. Then follow the signs. Tickets are $5.50 at Preston Ticket Agency, 363-9311, or $7.50 at the gate on the day of the picnic.



All listings are subject to late changes after press time. Call ahead to be sure.



Park, will feature major guest artists in a series of 12 performances, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday nights June 18 through July 19, 9 p.m. The Wednesday night series will be conducted by Louis Lane and will feature an all-Tchaikovsky program on June 25, an “American Salute” on July 2, an “Old Fashioned Pops” on July 9, and a salute to Bachrach and Jim Webb on July 16. The Friday night series will feature Tony Bennett on June 20, Willie Nelson on June 27, Dave and Darius Brubeck on July 18. The Saturday night series will also present Tony Bennett on June 21, and Victor Borge on July 12 and Roger Williams on July 19. Ticket prices range from $1 to $7, with a 25% discount for series subscribers. Tickets on sale at NorthPark and at the Symphony Office/826-7000.

SMU Division of Music summer workshops conclude with a music education workshop, June 23-27. For information on tuition and enrollment call 692-3342.

North Texas State University summer concerts include performances by the NTSU Campus Band at 8:15 p.m. on June 26 and July 31, the NTSU Summer Choir at 6:30 p.m. on July 1, and a composition recital at 8:15 p.m. on July 9. All concerts in the Music Rtcital Hall on the NTSU campus, Denton.



Summer Concert Series at the Fort Worth Art Museum features jazz, rock, and progressive country concerts: June 22, Little Whisper and the Rumors; June 29, Master Cylinder; July 2, Ham, Young and Norris, and Carroll-Smith; July 13, Camp & Co., and Silverlode. All concerts at 8 p.m. in the Scott Theater. Tickets $1.50/$l members and students. 1309 Montgomery/(817) 738-9215.



Dallas Summer Musicals present Edie Adams in Cole Porter’s Anything Goes June 17-29; Sandy Duncan in Peter Pan, July 1-13;

Debbie Reynolds in The Debbie Reynolds Show, July 15-27; and Tony Randall and Jack Klugman in Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple, July 29-August 2. Music Hall, Fair Park, Tues-Sun 8:15; matinees Sat & Sun 2:30. Tickets $2-$9, available at all Titche’s stores/748-9841.



Casa Manana, Fort Worth, presents Van Johnson in The Music Man, June 16-28; Martha Raye in Hello, Dolly!, June 30 – July 12; Gary Collins and Mary Ann Mobley in On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, July 14-July 26; and Ruta Lee in Irene, July 28-August 9. Mon through Sat at 8:15 p.m., matinee Sat at 2:30. Ticket information (817) 332-6221. 3101 West Lancaster, Fort Worth.



Music Mill Theater at Six Flags features a variety of performers. June 15: Barbi Benton. June 20: Ronnie Milsap. July 4: Don Wilhams. July 5: Chuck Berry. July 25: Anne Murray. Times vary; admission not included in Six Flags admission price. Call (817) 461-1200 for further information.



Bachman-Turner Overdrive in concert at Dallas Memorial Auditorium, June 18, 8 p.m. Tickets from Rainbow Ticket Service/ 341-8641.



The Rolling Stones, backed up by Eagles and Trapeze, perform at the Cotton Bowl, 2 p.m., on July 6. (Sold out.)



Steve Stills performs at the Tan-ant County Convention Center, July 15.



Fourth Annual Astrodome Kool Jazz Festival, in Houston, July 18 and 19, presents such performers as Gladys Knight and the Pips, The Temptations, Ramsey Lev/is, and the Isley Brothers. Tickets $5.50 to $10, from Preston Ticket Agency, 363-9311, and all H & W Record Stores.

Dance



Dallas Civic Ballet summer courses begin June 16 and run through July 11. Classes for all ages, pre-school to professional, and a special class for adult women, will be held at the studio at 3601 Rawlins. For information on schedule and fees call Mrs. Shellie Martin/526-1370.



Theater



Dallas Theater Center. The Amorous Flea, a musical version of Moliere’s School for Wives, will run through July 5. Promenade, All!, a comedy spanning four generations in the lives of an American family, will open July 15 and run through August 16. Kalita Humphreys Theater. Tickets $3.75-$5. 3636 Turtle Creek/526-8857.

Theatre Three. A production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is tentatively scheduled for a late June opening. Wed-Sat 8:30, Sun 7 p.m. and 2:30 matinee on alternate Sundays. Tickets $345.50 with student and group discounts. Quadrangle/ 748-5191.

Shakespeare Festival of Dallas presents free performances of Hamlet on July 10, 11, 12, 16 and 18, and of The Merry Wives of Windsor July 14, 15, 17, 19 and 20 at 8:15 in the Fair Park Band Shell. 526-6021.

Dallas Repertory Theater. Sandy Wilson’s The Boy Friend, a musical about the Twenties, opens June 19 and runs through July 19. Friday and Saturday, 8:15, $3.75. Sunday, 3 p.m., $3.25. Student, senior citizen, and group discounts. Community Hall, NorthPark/369-8966.

Oak Lawn Community Theatre. Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? concludes its run on June 19, 20, ana 21i. Performances at 8 p.m. Tickets $2.50 and $1.75. Old Trinity Methodist Church/Pearl and McKinney/745-9783.

NTSU Summer Repertory Theater, Denton. The Spiral Staircase will be presented June 19-21 in the Studio Theater. The House of Blue Leaves follows on June 26-28, in the University Theater. A Thurber Carnival will be staged in the Studio Theater on July 24-26. Call (817) 788-2428 for times and ticket information.



DINNER THEATERS

Country Dinner Playhouse. The Sunshine Boys, starring Gale Gordon, runs through July 6. Caesar Romero stars in My Three Angels, opening July 8. Tues-Sun, dinner 6:45, show 8:00. $6.95-$9.75, and group rates for 24 or more. Reservations. 11829 Abrams at LBJ/231-9457.

Crystal Palace Dinner Theater. Jim Backus presents a one-man show, through July 6. Tues-Sat, $6.95-$10.95, dinner 6:30, show 8:30. Reservations. 6532 Northwest Hwy (off Abrams) / 369-5153.

Granny’s Dinner Playhouse. Jo Anne Worley appears in Lovers and Other Strangers through June 28. Shelley Berman performs in Don’t Drink the Water, July 1-27. Dennis Cole opens in All the Girls Came out to Play on July 29. Tues-Sat $6.85-$10.25. Dinner 7 p.m., show 8:15. Reservations. 12205 Coit Rd/239-0153.

Windmill Dinner Theatre. The Star Spangled Girl, with Meredith MacRae, runs through June 22. Tues-Sun, dinner 6:30, show 8:30. Sunday matinee lunch 12:30, show 2 p.m. $6.50-$975. Matinee $5.50 for under age 21. Reservations. 4811 Keller Springs Rd/ 239-9104.

Film

UT-Dallas Film Program, Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. in Founders North Auditorium, UTD, Campbell Rd. in Richardson. Adults $l/children 50¢. Call 690-2281 for information. June 18: Murder, She Said (Britain, 1962). The incomparable Margaret Rutherford may not be the ideal actress to play Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple, but who cares? She’s wonderful. June 25: The Balcony (USA, 1963). Questionable casting – Shelley Winters, Peter Falk, (as a Parisian police chief!), Lee Grant, Ruby Dee, and Leonard Nimoy – for Jean Genet’s play about life in – and Life as – a brothel. Also Rhinoceros, a Czechoslovakian animated version of the Ionesco play.

July 2: Sabotage (Britain, 1936). Early Hitchcock, based on Conrad’s The Secret Agent, with Oskar Homolka and Sylvia Sidney.

July 9: Nights of Cabiria (Italy, 1957). Giuli-etta Masina’s affecting performance is one of the highlights of Fellini’s tragicomedy.

July 16: Comedy of Terrors (USA, 1963). An extraordinary collection of movie beasties – Vincent Price, Basil Rathbone, Peter Lorre, and Boris Karloff – get together in this horror-movie send-up directed by Jacques Tourneur.

July 23: Miss Julie (Sweden, 1950). Strindberg’s play directed by Bergman’s mentor, Alf Sjoberg, with Bergman’s star, Max von Sydow.

July 30: Mars Attacks the World (USA, 1936). Strictly for camp-followers and Art Deco freaks, this Flash Gordon opus with Buster Crabbe may take you back – or just take you aback.

Classic Films series of the Dallas Public Library. Free.

June 24: The Thief of Bagdad (1924). Magic carpets, Anna May Wong, and other oriental phenomena surround the ever-dashing Douglas Fairbanks. Raoul Walsh directed. (6:30 p.m., Polk-Wisdom branch.)

July 12: King Kong (1933). If the Empire State Building sequence doesn’t stir your acrophobia, nothing will. A few paltry humans like Fay Wray and Bruce Cabot mill around, but you know who the real star is. (2 p.m., Jefferson branch.)

July 19: The Mark of Zorro (1920). Dashing Douglas Fairbanks again, zipping around old Southern California. (3:30 p.m., Polk-Wisdom branch.)



Summer Film Series at the Dallas Public Library shows family films (G and PG rated) at all branches. Check with your nearest branch for dates and times. This summer’s features are: Bedknobs and Broomsticks: Not vintage Disney – in fact, a rather pallid attempt to recapture the delights of Mary Poppins – but still enlivened by Angela Lansbury and some cartoon characters.

Rascal: A Disney feature-length live-action film about a raccoon.

The Learning Tree: Not for the very young – hence the PG caution – but a beautifully photographed film about a young black growing up in Kansas. Directed by Gordon Parks, who wrote the autobiographical novel on which the film is based.

New American Cinema screens a variety of experimental, underground, and off-beat feature films and shorts. Every Saturday night at 11:30 p.m., Festival Theater, 3104 Maple. $2.25. 742-4201.

Dallas/SMU Cinema Society, a membership organization, meets once a month (except August and December) in the Bob Hope Theater for film and discussion. One-year membership $20/$35 couple. For information call 692-2979.

Summer Film Series at the Fort Worth Art Museum, 1309 Montgomery. All shows at 1:30 p.m. in the Scott Theater. $1.50/$l for members. Call (817) 738-9215 for information. June 20: The Philadelphia Story (1940). They don’t make them like this anymore, probably because we don’t have a young Katharine Hep-bum, Cary Grant, or Jimmy Stewart, and even if we did, we don’t have George Cukor in his prime to direct them. If you’ve never seen it, head for the Turnpike.

June 28: Grand Hotel (1932). If the plot palls, you can always sit there and wonder what’s holding up Greta Garbo’s dress, why the vibrant Joan Crawford of the Thirties turned into the suffering matron of the Forties, why people thought John and Lionel Barrymore were great actors instead of juicy hams, and a hundred other diverting speculations. Strictly for escape. July 12: All About Eve (1950). Yummy! Never were Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, George Sanders, Celeste Holm, or Thelma Ritter better than this. It’s the Great American Melodrama.

Art

Dallas Museum of Fine Arts. Masterworks of Primitive Art, featuring 150 pieces of African, Oceanian, and Pre-Columbian art from the Rockefeller Collection of the Museum of Primitive Art, New York, opens June 15. The first of the Museum’s special Bicentennial shows, The Era of Exploration: The Rise of Landscape Photography in the American West, 1860-1885, opens on July 23 and will run through August. The Norbert Schimmel Collection of Antiquities is on display until June 29. Tues-Sat 10-5. Fair Park/421-4187.

Owen Arts Center, SMU. A show by Jon Cars-man in the University Gallery will run through June. The Meadows Museum displays a permanent collection of Spanish painting from the 15th through the 20th centuries, with works by Goya, Picasso, Velazquez, and others. Both galleries are open 10-5 weekdays, 1-5 Sunday. The Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture Garden displays a permanent collection of sculpture by Henry Moore, David Smith, Maillol, and others. 692-2516.

Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, Fort Worth. Photographs by Frank Gohlke will be featured June 20 through August 3. The permanent collection of art of the American West includes paintings by Remington and Russell and 19th and 20th century paintings, prints, and photographs. Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5:30. 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd/(817) 738-1933.

Fort Worth Art Museum. Photographs by Michael Kostiuk, Dallas photographer, will be on display through June 20, along with selections from the museum’s permanent collection. A student architecture show, Four from Arlington/Four from Austin, opens June 22, and will run through July 13. A cooperative exhibition of works in the performing and visual arts, Fort Worth- Dallas /San Francisco, opens July 27 and will run through Sept. 7. Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5. 1309 Montgomery/(817) 738-9215.

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth. The Sum-mer Film Series, Sundays at 2 p.m., will screen Kenneth Clark’s series, Romantic vs. Classic Art, through September 7. The permanent collection includes works spanning 4500 years of art. The Museum building is one of the finest works of the late Louis I. Kahn. Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5. 1101 Will Rogers Rd/ (817) 332-8451.

GALLERIES

Afterimage. Eliot Porter, Santa Fe photographer who specializes in dye-transfer color prints, will have a show through July 5. Opening July 8 is a show of photographs from Russia by Chris Regas and Paul Greenberg. Mon-Sat 10-5:30, Thurs till 8:30. Quadrangle/748-2521.

Atelier Chapman Kelley. The show by Leon Berkowitz continues. Mon-Sat 10:30-5, Sun 1-5. 2526 Fairmount/747-9971.

Contemporary Gallery. A show of works on paper – drawings, watercolors, etchings, and lithographs – by 20th century artists, including Picasso, Miro. Chagall, Vasarely, and others, will open July 15. A show by Fort Worth artist Elvis Ballew precedes it in June. Mon-Sat 10:30-5,Thurstill8:30. Quadrangle/747-0141. Cushing Gallery. An exhibition of oils and water colors by Charles McGough, Albert Christ-Janer, Gerald Roy, Andres Escartin, and Gabor Peterdi opens June 21 for two weeks. Mon-Sat 10:30-4:30. 2723 Fairmount/ 747-0497.

Dupree Gallery. New England landscapes by Marjorie Portnow, Emily Elman, John Button, and Rackstraw Downes, will be on display through June 21. World War I posters will be featured from June 23 through the end of July. Mon-Sat 10-5:30. 420 Northgate Plaza Village, Irving/ 252-8481.

Michele Herling. The gallery specializes in Pre-Columbian, New Guinean, and African art. 12-5:30 Tues-Sat. Quadrangle/ 748-2924.

Fairmount Gallery. Photographs by DiAnne Malouf will be on display from June 20 through the end of July. Tues-Sat 11-5. 6040 Sherry Lane/ 369-5636.

The Front Room. Knitted wall hangings by Mary Walker Phillips will be displayed in June. Pottery by Dale and Mary Peterson will also be featured through July 7. Mon-Sat 10-5. In the Craft Compound/6617 Snider Plaza/ 369-8338.

Olla Pod Gallery. Enameling by Helen Green will be displayed for three weeks starting June 28. The artist will be on hand to demonstrate techniques on opening day. 10-5:30 Mon-Sat, Thurs till 9. Olla Podrida/12215 Coit Rd/ 239-0551.

Poster Place. New prints by Dali, Trova, and Vasarely will be featured. Mon-Sat 10-5:30, Thurs till 9. Olla Podrida/12215 Coit/661-3383.

Stewart Gallery. A one-woman show by Geor-gie Houston, featuring oils, acrylics, and collages, opens June 18. Tues-Sun 12-7, and by appointment. 12610 Coit Rd/661-0213.

2719 Gallery. A two-man show featuring work by Michael Pilié and Bart Forbes will run through June 22. Tues-Sat 11-5, Sun 2-5, and by appointment. 2719 Routh/ 748-2094.

Woolcraft and Clay Gallery. Wall hangings by June McKinley will be featured from July 1. Works by gallery regulars Corki Stucken-bruck and Andrew Wood will also be on display. Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun & Mon by appointment.. 2722 Routh/827-3345.



Kids



Creative Dramatic Workshop for kids 4 through 18 begins July 14. The 10-session course meets twice a week. Children are separated into small classes according to age, and given a chance to watch themselves in videotape playbacks. Fee for the course is $75. Sponsored by the Actors’ Workshop, 3506 Cedar Springs Rd. Call 528-2700 for information.

Be a clown at the Audelia Road branch of the Dallas Public Library on July 15 at 2:30 p.m. Jocko, the photographer clown, will demonstrate techniques of clown makeup, and turn a kid into a clown before your very eyes. Other July activities at library branches include puppet shows, films, style shows, talent shows, and much more. It’s free. Call your nearest branch for a schedule of activities.

Summer Soccer Camps, conducted by Dallas Tornado players, feature a week of instruction in all phases of the game for boys and girls 6 to 16. Participants watch videotapes of their play, and receive critiques from Tornado players. June 23: age 11 and under, Greenhill School. July 14: 12 and under, Texas Stadium. July 28: 14 and under, Texas Stadium. August 4: 16 and under, Texas Stadium. All sessions 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Fees range from $40 to $45. Call the Tornado office, 691-8111, for more information.

Scream for Ice Cream at The Rootabaga Book-ery, July 23, 3 p.m. Kids receive instruction in making ice cream, and in crafts like whittling, spinning, and weaving. Every second Monday is Trade and Swap Day at the Bookery from 2 to 3 p.m. Kids bring books, games, and records for exchange. 6715 Snider Plaza/ 361-8581.

The Giant Firefly and the Pickle Planet is an experiential program in the creative arts conducted by St. James Montessori School, July 7 through August 1. Kids 2? through 7 will be introduced to a variety of creative media, and will experience such novelties as a 35-foot inflatable pickle. 9 to 10:30 or 10:30 to 12. Fees $39 for three days a week, $26 for two days. 9845 McCree Rd/348-1345.

Kathy Burks Marionettes presents Hansel and Gretel during June, and Winnie the Pooh throughout July. Shows on Wed, Thurs and Sat at 11:30 a.m., 1, 3, and 4 p.m., and Thurs at 7:30 p.m. Tickets 75¢. Olla Podrida/12215 Coit Rd/387-0807.

Museum Eye summer children’s program at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, July 8 through 18 and Aug 5 through 15, introduces kids to the permanent collections of the Museum through art history, dramatics, theater, music and other projects. 10 a.m. to noon. Tuition $25. Enrollment limited to 25 students, scholarships available. Entry deadline June 20. For information call Lana Davis/421-4187, ext. 42.

Children’s Film Program on Primitive Art and Culture at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, June 17-20, will screen films on primitive societies for kids from third grade up in conjunction with the Masterpieces of Primitive Art show. 10:30 to noon, Auditorium Fair Park/ 421-4187.

Rug Rat Special on KERA-FM 90, 7-10 a.m. Sundays, presents famous performers reading famous stories. Tales for the very young are featured in the early hours, while stories for children over 10 are featured at later times.



Sports



BASEBALL

Texas Rangers, Arlington Stadium. Games at 8 p.m. except where noted otherwise. Box seats, $4.50 & $5. Reserved seats, S4. Bleacher seats (General admission), $2 for adults/$1.50 for children under 13. 265-3331.

June 17,18,19 vs. Chicago White Sox

June 27 vs. Minnesota Twins at 6 p.m.

(doubleheader)

June 28, 29 vs. Minnesota

July 1, 2,3 vs. Kansas City Royals

July 17,18 vs. New York Yankees

July 19,20, 21 vs Boston Red Sox

July 22, 23, 24 vs. Cleveland Indians

CRICKET

Dallas County Cricket Club holds matches every Sunday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. at Glencoe Park, Martel Ave at North Central Expwy (Exits 7 or 8). Spectators welcome, free. For further information, call Patrick McCarthy, 252-3549.

POLO

Willow Bend Polo and Hunt Club, FM Rd. 544, l’/2 miles west of Preston Rd. 248-6235. Matches every Sunday beginning about 3 p.m. Occasional Saturday matches. Spectators welcome. $1.50 for non-members.

QUARTER HORSE RACING

Ross Downs, Hwy 121, 4 miles southwest of Grapevine, 481-1071. From 9-19 races every Sunday, year ’round, beginning at 1 p.m. Adults $2/children $1.

RODEO

Juneteenth Black Rodeo. The first black rodeo ever held west of the Mississippi River and one of the largest events of its kind ever staged. All participants in this full-scale rodeo production will be black cowboys and cowgirls and events will include all popular rodeo contests. One of the contestants will be Dallas resident Cleo Hearn, one of the nation’s top rodeo stars. Fair Park Coliseum. Thursday, June 19. 1:30 p.m.: this performance will be designated a children’s performance, though general admission will be available to everyone. June 19, 7:30 p.m.: Grand Opening performance. June 20, 7:30 p.m.: final performance. Tickets available at all Sears stores, $2, $3, $4 & $5. Benefitting the Dallas Black Chamber of Commerce.

Mesquite Championship Rodeo. Professional rodeo stars compete every Fri & Sat night Apr thru Sept beginning at 8 p.m. The arena is located off LBJ Frwy at Military Pkwy exit. Box seats $3.50, Grandstands $2.50/$l for children under 12. For tickets and further information call 285-8777.



SOCCER

Dallas Tornado of the North American SoccerLeague, Texas Stadium. Tickets: Adults $5/ $2.50 children under 18. All games begin at 8 p.m. Call 691-8111 or 691-8197.

June 20 vs. Tampa Rowdies

June 27 vs. Vancouver Whitecaps

July 5 vs. St. Louis Stars

July 12 vs. Chicago Sting



Enlightenment



Swimming and diving classes for citizens of all ages and ability levels are offered at seven Dallas Independent School District pools this summer. Three-week sessions run June 30-July 18 and July 21-August 9. In addition to basic instruction, there will be courses in water ballet, scuba diving, and infant swimming. For information contact one of the following pools: Alamo pool, 1940 Oakland, 426-6971; Edison pool, 3002 Singleton, 638-2263; Loos pool, Spring Valley Rd, 241-7683; Lisbon pool, 4700 Horizon Dr, 376-0361; Pleasant Grove pool, 8204 Alto Gardens, 391-4736; Sprague pool, 3720 Boulder Dr, 331-3354; and White Rock pool, 11208 Hermosa Dr, 328-2551.

Summer Institute on Aging at North Texas State University in Denton will conduct a series of two-week courses for practitioners and professionals in the field of aging. The courses, which run through August 1, include the psychology of aging, social gerontology, and problems in public policy on aging. Applicants should contact the Center for Studies in Aging/NTSU/Denton, TX 76203.

Blockbuster Week celebrates the first anniversary of KERA-FM 90 with round-the-clock programming of the station’s most popular feature, the 11-hour indulgence in music and other features by a single performer or in a single genre.

July 11, 7 p.m.-6 a.m. (July 12): The Good Times and Happy Days Blockbuster, with selections and commentary by local pundits and bon vi-vants like Alex Burton, Dick Hitt, and John Anders.

July 12, 6 a.m.-6 p.m.: The Classic Jazz Blockbuster, with great performances by great performers, selected by Thorn Mason, founder and leader of the Dallas Jazz Orchestra.July 12, 6 p.m.-4 a.m.Muly 13): The California Dreamin’ Blockbuster, featuring California groups like the Mamas and the Papas, the Beach Boys, The Grateful Dead, and the Jefferson Airplane.

July l3, 4 a.m.-4 p.m.: The Bach Family Block~ buster, with the cream of J. S., J. C, K. P. E., W. F., J. C. F., and the rest of the Family. A Bachbuster, perhaps?

July 13, 4 p.m.-4 a.m. (July 14): The Warhorse Blockbuster, with John Ardoin’s selections of the classic performances of the classics.

July 14, 4 a.m.-4 p.m.: The Tin Pan Alley to Broadway Blockbuster, with arguably the greatest music ever written in this country, the songs of George Gershwin, Rodgers and Hart, and Cole Porter.

July 14, 4 p.m.-4 a.m. (July 15): The Flite Time Blockbuster, hosted by Jean Fugett, featuring Miles Davis and progressive jazz in general.

July 15, 4 a.m.-4 p.m.: The Golden Throat Blockbuster. Who else but Jo Stafford, Mario Lanza, Ethel Merman, Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra, Vaughan Monroe, Dean Martin, and Bing Crosby?

July 15, 4 p.m.-4 a.m. (July 16): The Mystery and Imagination Blockbuster, with the best of Inner Sanctum, Suspense, and Orson Welles. July 16, 4 a.m.-4 p.m.: The Classic Country Blockbuster, featuring Bob Wills, Kitty Wells, Patsy Cline, and Hank Williams.

July 16, 4 p.m.-4 a.m. (July 17): The Texas Musicians Blockbuster, everyone from Ernest Tubb to Lightnin’ Hopkins to Buddy Holly to Janis Joplin.

July 17, 4 a.m.-4 p.m.: The American Composers Blockbuster, with works by composers William Billings in the eighteenth century to Elliot Carter in the twentieth.

July 17, 4 p.m.-4 a.m. (July 18): The Dixieland Blockbuster, featuring Louis Armstrong.

July 18, 4 a.m.-4 p.m.: The Close Harmony Blockbuster, with everything from Gregorian chant to barbership quartets, by way of the Ink Spots and the Ames Brothers.

July 18, 4 p.m.-4 a.m. (July 19): The Folk Revival Blockbuster, with Peter Lesser’s collection of what passed for folk music in the crewcut and coffee-house era: The Kingston Trio, Peter, Paul, and Mary, Bob Dylan, et al.

July 19, 4 a.m.-6 p.m.: The Hugh Lampman Jazz Blockbuster, featuring Lampman’s collection of the jazz of the Fifties and Sixties.

Creative Stitchers of Texas display their work at the 011a Podrida, July 20-26. Also featured are a display of needlepoint and original needlepoint canvas art, through June 18, and portraits by Dimitri Vail, June 19-July 3.12215 Coit Rd/ 239-8541.

What’s Your Sagittarius?, the summer show at the Richland College Planetarium, explores the facts and fables of astrology through the effect of a newspaper horoscope on the lives of a Typical Ail-American Married Couple. Shows at 2, 3, and 4 p.m. Sundays, 8 p.m. Wednesdays. Adults 75¢ / children 6-11 25¢ (Children under six not admitted). 12800 Abrams at LBJ / 746-4582, 746-4444.

Channel 13 Summer Festival, June 21-29, presents a series of special programs, including highlights from the original Jack Benny TV show, June 21-26; In the Beginning, a documentary with Lord Kenneth Clark, June 23; This is Noel Coward, a tribute to the late writer-actor featuring appearances by Richard Burton, Maurice Chevalier, Dame Edith Evans, and clips from films based on Coward plays, June 24; The Gang’s All Here, the Busby Berkeley 1943 extravaganza with Alice Faye and Carmen Miranda, June 26; and Great Performances: Three by Balanchine, a dance concert celebrating the work of the great choreographer, June 29. Check local newspaper listings for times and other events.

Community Service Programs at Eastfield College include special courses. Classes in microwave cooking start June 28 and July 12, a Defensive Driving course on July 9, instruction in palmistry and tarot card reading on June 19 and 23, and a variety of sports courses (golf, tennis, sailing, swimming, football and baseball) for all ages, including a “Water Babies” swimming course for children nine months or older, at a variety of times. Write Ms. Kathleen M. Kurtz/Eastfield College/3737 Motley Dr/ Mesquite, TX 75149 for information, or call 746-3113 or 746-3114.

second Annual Pigs vs. Freaks Softball Game, a benefit for the East Dallas Boys’ Club, will be held June 30 at 7:30 p.m. in the State Fair Coliseum. Tickets $2. Texas Rangers players will be there to sign autographs.

Women and Work rap sessions are held July 3 and 17, and the first and third Thursday of every month. Topics are scheduled by the 15th of every month for this series of meetings with prominent Dallas women in a variety of professions. Fee $2.50 per session. Reserve space by calling 522-3560. All meetings at the Women for Change Center/3220 Lemmon.



Out and About



(Credit card notations: MC-Master Charge, BA-BankAmericard, AE-American Express, DC-Diner’s Club, CB-Carte Blanche. “All credit cards” indicates that all of the above are accepted.)

Adobe Flats. Two bands every night playing rock and country rock, seven nights a week. Good game room, often crowded. Cover charge: $1 weekdays, $2 men/ $1 women on weekends. Sandwiches, pizza, and snacks. (4422 Lemmon/ 526-2080/ 11 a.m.-2 a.m.)

Aunt Emma’s. Formerly the Levee, it’s been remodeled in both decor and music, now featuring good-time bluegrass bands. Still a hand-clappin’ place. Burgers, chili, etc. available all hours. (5676 Mockingbird/ 827-7777/ 11 a.m.-2 a.m. seven days a week).

Bobby McGee’s Conglomeration. Quite a scene: Four completely different and lavishly decorated dining rooms (one features upholstered toilets as chairs), a disc-jockey discotheque dance floor, a 70-foot-long bar, and costumed waiters and waitresses. The food (prime rib, steak, shrimp) is a secondary feature. Great capuccino. (512 Hillside Village/ 826-9020/ 5:30 p.m.-2 a.m.-seven days a week/ MC, BA, AE, DC)

Bowley & Wilson’s Alley. A new name for an old favorite (Up Your Alley). A popular college and twenties spot featuring Bowley & Wilson playing progressive country laced with stand-up comedy. Most weekends are standing room only. Cover varies, Thurs-Sat (Yale & Greenville/ 368-9598/ Tues-Sat 7 p.m.-2 a.m.)

Bully’s. A juke box pub with a good stand-up-and-mingle bar and an easygoing, blue jean style. Features half-price drinks all day Sunday. Good imported beer selection and sandwiches. (4814 Greenville/ 361-5979/ 11 a.m.-2 a.m. seven days a week/ BA.AE)

Chelsea Corner. Quiet and comfortable. A refreshingly diverse clientele sparks lots of good conversation. Atmosphere of an English pub on the wharf. Live entertainment, usually a solo singer/guitarist. Good sandwiches and a cheese and sausage snack tray. Great service. (4830 McKinneyl 526-9327/ weekdays 11:30 a.m.-2 a.m., weekends 2 p.m.-2 a.m. IMC)

The Den. A distinctive spot in the old Stoneleigh Hotel with a New York hotel bar flavor. Attracts a semi-chic, semi-business crowd. Growing popularity, especially during the after-work hours. (2927 Maple/ 742-7111/ Weekdays 11 a.m.-2 am., weekends 4 p.m.-2 a.m./ MC, DC, AE, CB)

Downstairs at the Registry. A prominent addition to the hotel/club scene, classy and luxurious. Live entertainment with special emphasis on rising young talent from around the country, with an occasional big name star. Shows at 9 & 11 p.m. By membership, $5 (includes two drinks on night of purchase). (Registry Hotel, Mockingbird at Stemmons/ 630-7000/ Mon-Fri 5 p.m.-2 a.m., Sat 7 p.m.-2 a.m., closed Sun/ BA.AE, CB)

Ethyl’s. Bluegrass bands Wed-Sat nights. $1 cover charge. Jam session Sunday, varied entertainment Mon & Tues. More and more older bluegrass fans are joining in with the good-time, down-home atmosphere. Live radio broadcast on Wednesday nights. (3605 McKinney/ 522-8900/ 4 p.m.-2 a.m. seven days a week)

Faces. Spacious and comfortable, with live bands every night, mostly progressive country. Good-sized dance floor and an excellent sound system. Half-priced mixed drinks every Wednesday. Cover $1 all nights except with big name band. Ladies free, Sun & Mon. (4001 Cedar Springs/ 526-9004/ 6 p.m.-2 a.m., seven days a week/ MC)

Fannie Ann’s. Progressive country is the musical fare, live bands every night. The popular house band, Summer-field, plays 2 weeks out of each month. Pore, Cooke & Neal play every Sun & Mon night. A mixed but mainly mid-twenties crowd. Flashing dance floor and silent movies. Crowded on weekends. June 25-28, Ray Wylie Hubbard. July 17 – 19, Angie Meyers and the Western Head Band. 50¢ cover charge weekdays, $l-$1.50 weekends. (4714 Greenville/ 368-9003/ Mon-Sat 4 p.m.-2 a.m., Sun 8 p.m.-2 a.m.)

Gatsby’s Bicycle Bar. A downtown piano bar in ’20’s decor. Silent movies and slides on three screens. Good spot for afternoon, after business drink. The Coco Loco is the house specialty. (Statler Hilton/ 747-2011/ Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-2 a.m., Sun 12 noon-2 a.m./ All major credit cards)

Gertie’s. Dance till 5 a.m. to live and loud rock V roll. 2 bands each weekend night. One of the few after-hours bars and one of the few clubs that still go mostly with hard rock (and a touch of glitter). $1 cover weekdays/$2 on weekends. (3911 Lemmon/ 522-4130 or 526-9543/ Sun-Wed 8 p.m.-2 a.m., Thurs-Sat 8 p.m.-5 a.m.)

General Store. Live entertainment nightly playing folk and country rock. Good bands and fantastic sandwiches. 50¢ cover weekdays, $1 on weekends. (4820 Greenville/ 368-9686/ 11 a.m.-2 am. seven days a week)

The Great Indoors. The Jerry Hitt Trio entertains in an atmosphere of sophistication. Dancing to a musical range from pop to classic from Hitt’s concert grand piano. Second Sunday of every month is a concert style presentation – shows at 8, 10 and 12. (5728 E. Lovers Ln.1 6920557/ Mon-Sat 7 p.m.-2 a.m.)

Greek Key. Greek belly dancers in an atmosphere that can get downright festive at patron participation time. Join in with the staff in traditional Greek dances. Live music, Greek & American. Full menu of Greek cuisine, steak, lobster. Family Feast every Sun, noon – 3 p.m. Banquet facilities available. (2920 Northwest Hwy/ 358-5177/ Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-2 a.m., Sun 4 p.m.-2 a.m. / All major credit cards)

Harper’s Corner. Drinking, dining and dancing with a panoramic view. An atmosphere of relaxed elegance. The Rio Pardo group performs a variety of musical selections nightly. (Hilton Inn, 5600 N. Cen. Expwyl 827-4100/’ Mon-Sat 8 p.m.-l a.m./ All major credit cards)

It’s Magic. A new club with a new twist – live entertainment nightly by magicians. Top magic acts, national and international, rotate weekly and also include hypnotists, ESP experts, etc. The club itself is full of tricks, such as a levitating phone booth and a small back room accessible only by “secret panel,” where a sleight-of-hand artist performs nightly. When the magicians are not on stage, it’s a discotheque. No cover; 21 or over only. (5417 Greenville/ 369-6202/ Daily 4:30 p.m.-2 a.m., magic acts begin at 9/ MC,AE)

J. Alfred’s. A boisterous beer bar. Ever popular and always crowded. Juke box music with some nostalgic highlights, from Sinatra to the Beach Boys. Some of the best bar sandwiches in town and a limited selection of mixed drinks. (4417 Oak Lawn/ 526-9222/ Sun-Thur 11 a.m.-l a.m., Fri & Sat till 2 a.m.)

J. Mulkey’s. A delightful beer garden and restaurant serving sandwiches and home-style hot plate lunches and dinners, $1.95-$2.25. The blackboard menu changes daily. Live enter-tainmentevery eveningexcept Monday, usually a solo musician or small group. (3136 Routh St. at Woodrow (Chelsea Square)/ 748-3500/ Tue-Sun 8 a.m.-10 p.m., except Sat till 1 a.m.; Mon 8 a.m.-5 p.m..)

King’s Club. Downtown supper club with a warm and regal atmosphere. Private club, but temporary memberships easily available (fee). Live entertainers include vocalists, comedians, and musical groups. June 16-28, Tetter and McDonald, comedians. Steaks & seafood. $1.50 cover Mon-Thur. $2 Fri & Sat. (Adolphus Hotel, 6th floor/ 742-2884/ Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-12:15 a.m.)

Knox St. Pub. Nostalgic without really trying. Stew, chili, salads and sandwiches are generous. Growing popularity with the noon crowd. Good place for quiet sipping and talking. (3230 Knox/ 526-9476/ Mon-Sat 10-2 a.m.)

# 3 Lift. True to its name, this discotheque is thoroughly decked out in ski chalet motif, complete with a disc jockey perched in a ski lift chair. Big circular dance floor and 70-ft. bar. Located on one corner of the expansive new European Crossroads development, the club has quickly established a big and friendly following, mainly singles. Never a cover. (2829 N W Hwy/ 350-5509/ seven days a week, noon-2 a.m. / MC.AE)

Longhom Ballroom. One of the last of the grand old country and western dance halls has begun a progressive country series featuring some of the best of the Texas performers. June 17, Willie Nelson. June 24 & 25, New Riders of the Purple Sage. July 1, Asleep at the Wheel. July 8, David Alan Coe (tentative). July 18, Joe Stampley. On other nights, Wed thru Sun, the Ballroom’s regular nine-piece band, Dewey Groom and the Longhorns, plays. Cover varies with the performers. (216 Corinth at Industrial/ 428-3128/Wed & Thur 8:30-12, Fri & Sat 9-2, Sun 4-12)

Mariano’s. A lively mariachi band, fantastic frozen margaritas, and lavish Mexican courtyard decor contribute to the fiesta feeling that has made this a popular place. Recent expansion has taken the dancing out of the aisles and on to a real dance floor. A full menu of Mexican food – good, but not great, and a little expensive. (Old Town, 5500 Greenville/ 691-3888/ Sun-Thur 11-11:30, bar till 1; Fri & Sat 11-11, bar till 21 No reservations/ MC.BA.AE)

Maxine Kent’s. Small groups, usually duos and trios, playing easy listening music from pop to country for a thirtyish clientele. Dancing. Jazz jam session every Sunday. (5405 Lemmonl 526-2200/ Mon-Fri 2 p.m.-2 a.m., Sat Noon-2 a.m., Sun 5 p.m.-2 a.m.IAE, DC, CB)

Mazo’s Pub. A comfortable neighborhood bar with light rock and folk music. A three-piece band, Empty Pockets, plays Thur-Sun and has established a loyal following. Recently remodeled – there are more places to sit now. 50¢ cover Thur-Sat. (4912 Cole/ 526-9251/ Mon-Sat 3 p.m.-2 a.m.)

Mickey Bicker’s Suite 113. A dine, drink and dance club, popular with the thirties age group. Lunches and dinners from sandwiches to prime rib. Live entertainment is usually a versatile two-piece pianist/guitarist band. A sister club, Mickey Bicker’s Suite 101, is very similar. (Suite 113, 5224 Greenville, 691-1311/ Suite 101, 3039 W. Northwest Hwy, 358-3461/ Both clubs: 11 a.m.-2 a.m. seven days a week/ AE, MC)

Mother Blues. A long-standing name in Dallas, Mother Blues is now in a more slick and elaborate setting with a stronger emphasis on national name bands. June 16-18, Chuck Man-gione. June 19-22, Fancy Space. July 10-13, Balcones Fault. July 14-16, Jonathan Edwards. Cover varies for name performers. $2-$4. No cover on week-nights with local bands. Weekend cover good at Gertie’s after hours. Sunday special: hamburger plate and all-you-can-drink beer, $2. (4015 Lemmon/528-3842/6p.m.-2 a.m. seven days a week)

N.F.L. Headquarters for the local darts circuit. If you want to join, this is where the big boys play. A really offbeat pub with an Irish ethnic flair. The loyal patronage is always lively, always ready to celebrate, (3520 Oak Lawn at Bowser/ 526-9444/ 4p.m.-2 a.m. Seven days a week)

Ojeda’s Cantina y Botanas. A new club from the Ojeda family (of Mexican cafe renown). Entertainment features the best of the area’s Spanish guitarists. Nachos, dips, and Carta Blanca on tap. (5804 Cedar Springs at Inwood / 351-9254/ Mon-Sat 4 p.m.-2 a.m.)

The Old Church. A beautiful 1909 church building turned into a great looking bar. Music by jukebox, a loud one. A limited lunch menu with great burgers and clam chowder. Half-price drinks all night Mondays. Service, or lack of it, can be exasperating at times. (4501 Cole/ 526-9332/ Mon-Thur 11 a.m.-1 a.m., Fri & Sat till 2. Sun 5 o.m.-1 a.m. / MC. BA. AE)

The Old Theater. They call themselves a “disco-flick.” A rejuvenated movie theater with two dance floors, two bars, and 14 levels. Old movies, slides, and cartoons on the full-size screen. A new feature is occasional live entertainment by local and big name bands on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, or Thursdays with varying cover, $l-$4. Weekends are always discotheque with no cover and big crowds. (2711 Storey Ln / 358-1771 / Sun-Sat 7 p.m.-2 a.m. / MC, AE)

Oz. Elaborate “European-style” discotheque trimmed in ultra-modern decor with neon and mirrors. Eleven different levels offer music, dancing, film and conversation spots. Music now is usually by disc jockey, though occasional live acts are brought in. Memberships are $25 per year or $5 for a temporary (3 day). (5429 LBJ Freeway / 233-5755 / Tue-Fri 4 p.m.-2 a.m., Sat & Sun 7 p.m.-2 a.m. / MC, BA.AE)

The Pawn Shop. A beautifully designed and decorated bar/restaurant with balcony drinking parlors, a network of overhead fans, and a scattering of antiques and plants. The menu was recently expanded to include shrimp, steaks & chicken in addition to spaghetti and lasagne. Very popular happy hour from 4-7 every day. (5601 Greenville across from Old Town / 691-2411 / Daily 11:30 a.m.-l:30 a.m. / AC, BA)

The Point. One of the leaders on the swingles scene. Two live bands (Top 40 stuff). Dancing on two levels. A very personalized club with a clientele of many regulars. Cover: $1.50 weekends, $1 weekdays. (5915-A E. Northwest Hwy/ 363-7924/ 7 p.m.-2 a.m. seven days a week/ MC, AE)

The Quiet Man. Chic it’s not, but widely diverse devotees call it comfortable for beer, darts and animated conversation. Patrons are apt to entertain with a guitar or a bagpipe. Outdoor tables. Ownership and clientele make this an ever-interesting spot. (3120 Knox/ 526-6180/ Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-2 a.m., Sun noon-2 a.m.)

Recovery Room. A comfortable retreat for jazz fans, the Recovery Room offers some of the most consistently good live jazz in town on an every night basis. The other attraction here is the clientele itself, one of Dallas’ few real mixed bag crowds-friendly and unassuming. No cover, two drink minimum. (4306 Cedar Springs/ 526-1601/ Mon-Sat 6 p.m.-2 a.m.)

Rooster Tail. A promising new hangout for fans of jazz and blues-the specialty of the house here. Live music nightly; jazz jams every Sunday afternoon. Beer only; set-ups, BYOB. Mich-elob on tap, 25? on Thursday. (5122 W. Lovers Lane / 358-0587/ Daily 2 p.m.-2 a.m.)

Silver Eagle Mining Co. Progressive country and light rock bands nightly. A popular games bar with a very young (under 20) crowd. Midnight happy hour with half-price drinks and 25¢ beer. 50¢ cover, $1 on weekends. (3122 In-wood/ 257-1911/ Mon-Fri, Noon-2 a.m., Sat 7 p.m.-2 a.m.)

Sneaky Pete’s. An increasingly popular club for live rock and dancing. Bands every night beginning at 9 p.m. June 16-21, Baked Bears. June 23-28, Lightning. July 6-12, Quest. July 13-19, Daniel. Lunch and dinner, featuring half-pound burgers, foot-long hot dogs, chili. Cover: $1 weekdays, $2 weekends, unescorted ladies always free. (714 Medallion Ctr./368-9107/ 11 a.m.-2 a.m., seven days a week, Lunch 11-2, Dinner 5-111MC)

Stables. A relaxed atmosphere and rustic decor set the mood in this college-clientele type pub. No live music anymore, but music by jukebox, a lot of games, and 954 pitchers Mon. through Fri. are solid attractions. (5645 Yale/ 368-9081/ Mon.-Sat. 7p.m.-2 a.m.)

Stoneleigh P. A pharmacy from 1926-1973, furniture and fixtures have been restored to recreate an old time pharmacy setting, with relaxed and congenial atmosphere. As much a restaurant as it is a bar, the unusual menu includes provolone cheeseburgers on pumpernickel buns and grilled, marinated chicken breasts, plus soup, salad, and sandwiches-all very good. A comprehensive magazine rack with browsing encouraged and a fabulous juke box ranging from Bach to Stones. (2926 Maple/ 741-0824/ 11 a.m.-2 a.m. seven days a week)

Strictly Ta-Bu. This long-standing Dallas bar (formerly the Ta-Bu Room) has been graciously revived by new ownership. The original 1948 decor has been essentially retained, complemented by a jukebox packed with Fifties oldies and jazz. A baby grand piano hosts occasional performers. A very mixed clientele-young and old, straight and gay. Good burgers, pizza, steaks, and seafood, served till 11, till midnight on weekends. (4111 Lomo Alto/526-9325/ Sun-Thur 11:30-1 a.m., Fri & Sat till 2/ MC, BA)

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