Healthcare Education

How UTA is Addressing Texas’ Nursing Shortage

The school has produced more than 19,000 students through their online RN-to-BSN program.

The burden of the extreme nursing shortage has led Texas hospitals to hike pay and attach fringe benefits for recruitment, despite the toll it inflicts on their bottom line. UT Arlington is working to reduce the shortage by educating an entire generation of nurses, having produced more than 19,000 students through their online RN-to-BSN program.

UTA’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation (CoNHI) enrolls an average class of 700 students each year, as they attempt to tackle the predicted deficit of 60,000 Texan nurses by 2030. The hefty impact produced by UTA alumni is hard to dismiss – especially when it ties down to local hospitals. UTA partners with 38 district hospitals including UT Southwestern Medical Center, Children’s Health, Texas Health Resources, and Medical City Arlington- fulfilling patient care needs within the community and beyond.

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that in less than two decades, older adults will outnumber children for the first time in U.S. history. This rapidly aging population contributes to the increasing need for health care professionals, especially nurses. Nationwide, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says that the demand for nurses is expected to grow by 15 percent between 2016 and 2026, compared to 7 percent growth across all other occupations.

“Nursing is a profession that is in high demand and generally enjoys job security, a respectable salary and work hours,” says Beth Mancini, professor emeritus. The Texas nursing shortage, in particular, creates many opportunities for prospective nursing students looking to enter UTA’s accelerated RN program, where they can earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and take advantage of the growing number of nursing jobs across the state.

Newsletter

Keep me up to date on the latest happenings and all that D Magazine has to offer.

Comments