STREET TALK

December 15 marks the last chance for some lucky-and impressively résume’d-Dallas mover and shaker to go to the White House for a year. That’s the deadline for applicants to the While House Fellowship program. For one year, the eleven to twenty people chosen work for the president either in the Executive Office or an Executive Branch agency. The fellowship program has not yet cranked out a Jefferson for the Eighties, but it has left its mark on Hunt Oil’s Walt Humann, former Times Herald exec Tom Johnson, and San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros.

Humann, now with Hunt Consolidated Inc., recalls his year (1966-67) as an amazing education. “i felt like I didn’t deserve it, and I felt a real commitment to pay back some people. I wouldn’t trade for the experience.”

If you think you have the White (House) Stuff, request an application from: The President’s Commission on White House Fellowships, 712 Jackson Place N.W.. Washington, D.C. 20503.



Gentlemen, start your engines.

Now turn them off.

Okay, just kidding, turn them on. Oops. Sorry. Off.

What’s that. Buddy Boren?

You say you’ve got an announcement of major large super-huge importance in the next ten days? Give or take a week or two, at the very most a month? You”re maybe almost positively sure that we might have a Spirit of Grand Prix race right here in Dallas in 1987? Depending on the sensitive negotiations you are currently involved in, still, as always? With NASCAR? Or CART? Or IMSA?

“Well,” Buddy says, “It’s looking good. I don’t want to keep you in the dark, but we’re telling everyone in the press that we’re involved in some sensitive negotiations right now.”

All of them looking good right now? Just like they did all spring? And then all summer? Gosh, here it is fall, almost winter, and they still look good.

“I may hear something today or tomorrow. Or Monday. 1 think they all look good right now. It’s hard to say.”

Three days pass.

Monday cometh.

Prithee. Buddy: what news of Grand Prix? “’We’re still waiting for confirmation of a date in Dallas for 1987. We are in the process of putting a deal together. I don’t think you’ll be off to say that we’re running a race, we just don’t know which one yet. I feel positive we’ll have a race in 1987.”

So, gentlemen, cross your fingers. Put some more quarters in the meter. And stay tuned.



Yes, the law firm of Hutchison Price Boyle & Brooks did in fact have a March merger with Jen-kens & Gilchrist. And yes, they did finally unmerge. or dis-merge, or emerge, or whatever it is you do when you call a merger off. But there wasn’t any fist-fight, as per ugly rumors you may have heard. Ray Hutchison says he didn’t poke J&G’s Christie Flanagan in the eye or anywhere else, and he says that Christie didn’t poke him. “There were no heated moments and no fistfights.”

To hear Hutchison tell it. the unmerger of the merger-which would have created one of the biggest firms in town-wasn’t a divorce, really. It was more of a trial marriage that resulted in a friendly separation.

HPB&B first allowed itself to be seduced by J&G’s worldly knowledge of securities law and bank regulatory matters. Hutchison felt his group could learn from a larger, older company. Then he found out the hard way that he wasn’t quite ready to settle down.

As far as custody, Hutchison and family will keep his thirty or so lawyers, and Jenkens & Gil-christ will continue to feed and clothe their brood of 150 or so junior jurists.

It could have been a beautiful thing, those two. But ’tis better to have merged and lost…. Sometimes partners just grow apart, you know?

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