Rawlins Gilliland, Fundraiser Extraordinaire

KERA is in full membership-drive mode, and all that begging for cash can get a little tedious. But yesterday evening from 4 to 7, it was a “wheels off dance party” with Jeff Whittington and frequent FB commenter Rawlins Gilliland. Gilliland had a story for every person who called in: a cousin from Fort Worth, a girl who was a cheerleader in his high school class (She looked good at the reunion, y’all. But that was after Rawlins had a few margaritas). I’m not sure if enough people called to get the $1,000 matching grant, but Rawlins, you’re a gem. Let’s be friends.

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Comments

5 responses to “Rawlins Gilliland, Fundraiser Extraordinaire”

  1. DGirl says:

    I love RW. Only know him a la distance, but I love what I see. If he didn’t reach the $1000 mark and needs a few bucks, I’m in.

  2. Obama's Seat says:

    When they pass the Fairness Doctrine, those fundraising segments are gonna go.

  3. Holly says:

    I really want Jeff and Rawlins to have their own show.
    Or! Rawlins should regularly join Jeff on Anything You Ever Wanted to Know. Those two make radio magic.

  4. Christy Robinson says:

    Love me some Rawlins. Dallas treasure.

  5. Bill Marvel says:

    Here’s the secret of his success. Once upon a time newspapers and radio stations established close bonds with their communities by fostering and supporting columnists, on-air personalities, etc., whom the community came to know. These folks had huge local followings. This idea faded with the formula radio of the 1960s and with increasing chain ownership of the media.
    Rawlins has such a following. Folks hear his voice on KERA, and when pledge drive rolls around they respond.
    There are a few such community voices still left, but with the kind of corporate ownership that now controls the media, most of them are endangered species.
    (Those on this forum who whine about Steve Blow don’t get it; he doesn’t have to be sophisticated. All he has to do is connect with his audience.)
    Who are the few strong local voices remaining? You can probably think of a one or two. Who are the ones whose places are secure in this age of dispensability? Bet you can’t think of any.