Food and Spirits DINING OUT

Themes and Variations



Once upon a time, I suspect, a man, probably a California man, was sitting in a train station, probably a California train station, waiting for a train. He was, I suspect, bored, and he was also hungry. As he sat there, staring out at the railroad yard and the side tracks lined with empty boxcars in disuse, his empty stomach prompted his mind to wander wistfully back to memorable meals in the dining car, everyman’s luxury during the heyday of the railroads. And then it happened. Something snapped. A mental moment almost as momentous as the light bulb that clicked on in Edison’s head. “Wow,” I suspect this man said to himself as his vision took shape in his head. “A restaurant made out of old boxcars. The world will love it. I’ll be rich. Wow.”

The world loved it. And, somewhere, that man is rich. And he probably doesn’t even realize that he has had more impact on life in Dallas, Texas than Mr. Neiman and Mr. Marcus put together. Dallas, as Themes and Variations



Once upon a time, I suspect, a man, probably a California man, was sitting in a train station, probably a California train station, waiting for a train. He was, I suspect, bored, and he was also hungry. As he sat there, staring out at the railroad yard and the side tracks lined with empty boxcars in disuse, his empty stomach prompted his mind to wander wistfully back to memorable meals in the dining car, everyman’s luxury during the heyday of the railroads. And then it happened. Something snapped. A mental moment almost as momentous as the light bulb that clicked on in Edison’s head. “Wow,” I suspect this man said to himself as his vision took shape in his head. “A restaurant made out of old boxcars. The world will love it. I’ll be rich. Wow.”

The world loved it. And, somewhere, that man is rich. And he probably doesn’t even realize that he has had more impact on life in Dallas, Texas than Mr. Neiman and Mr. Marcus put together. Dallas, as you may have suspected, is the Restaurant Gimmickry Capital of the World. This is not an arbitrary assessment – it’s an official one. When the Texas Restaurant Association held its convention in Dallas recently, Market Hall was teeming with out-of-staters; you could ask any conventioneer why he was here and he’d give you the same answer as all the others: “We come to Dallas to steal ideas. We’ll look around, find the latest restaurant gimmicks that are working, and pack them off to Memphis or Phoenix or Denver or Birmingham and reproduce them. Bingo. Easy money.”

You may have noticed that TGI Friday’s, maybe the biggest and best of kind, is moving their national headquarters to Dallas. That’s not just happenstance.

All of which really puts the heat on the local entrepreneurial spirit. With the eyes of an industry upon them, the nouveau-restaurateurs of Dallas can’t get by with average, run-of-the-mill gimmicks. Boxcars just aren’t enough anymore. A man you may have suspected, is the Restaurant Gimmickry Capital of the World. This is not an arbitrary assessment – it’s an official one. When the Texas Restaurant Association held its convention in Dallas recently, Market Hall was teeming with out-of-staters; you could ask any conventioneer why he was here and he’d give you the same answer as all the others: “We come to Dallas to steal ideas. We’ll look around, find the latest restaurant gimmicks that are working, and pack them off to Memphis or Phoenix or Denver or Birmingham and reproduce them. Bingo. Easy money.”

You may have noticed that TGI Friday’s, maybe the biggest and best of kind, is moving their national headquarters to Dallas. That’s not just happenstance.

All of which really puts the heat on the local entrepreneurial spirit. With the eyes of an industry upon them, the nouveau-restaurateurs of Dallas can’t get by with average, run-of-the-mill gimmicks. Boxcars just aren’t enough anymore. A man with a notion called the magazine office recently with his new restaurant scheme. He was in the planning stages and wanted some feedback on his idea, which is to build a hamburger emporium called The Chocolate Factory, modeled after the fantastical movie set in “Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.” I mentioned to him that I had a little trouble in my own mind relating chocolate to hamburger. ’ Yeah,” he replied, “we tried that.” “What?” “Chocolate hamburgers – we with a notion called the magazine office recently with his new restaurant scheme. He was in the planning stages and wanted some feedback on his idea, which is to build a hamburger emporium called The Chocolate Factory, modeled after the fantastical movie set in “Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.” I mentioned to him that I had a little trouble in my own mind relating chocolate to hamburger. ’ Yeah,” he replied, “we tried that.” “What?” “Chocolate hamburgers – we tested that. Didn’t work too well.”

But you just can’t be timid. As proved by two of the latest efforts on the local scene. We knew that the 94th Aero Squadron restaurant was on a runway at Love Field but we weren’t sure exactly where. It was night and it was dark and we were having trouble finding the place and then we realized why. The Lemmon Avenue sign for the restaurant is camouflaged – it’s done with those olive and tan blotches that the U. S. Army wears in the jungle, which makes the sign hard to see and harder to read. Clever, eh? As we approached the parking lot a uniformed soldier in a World War I helmet with a rifle stopped our car and told us to enjoy our meal.

I think we were expecting a remodeled airplane hangar, so it came as something tested that. Didn’t work too well.”

But you just can’t be timid. As proved by two of the latest efforts on the local scene. We knew that the 94th Aero Squadron restaurant was on a runway at Love Field but we weren’t sure exactly where. It was night and it was dark and we were having trouble finding the place and then we realized why. The Lemmon Avenue sign for the restaurant is camouflaged – it’s done with those olive and tan blotches that the U. S. Army wears in the jungle, which makes the sign hard to see and harder to read. Clever, eh? As we approached the parking lot a uniformed soldier in a World War I helmet with a rifle stopped our car and told us to enjoy our meal.

I think we were expecting a remodeled airplane hangar, so it came as something of a surprise to find instead an elaborate replica of a French-farmhouse-turned-fort, just like in the movies. The building does sit beside a still-active Love Field runway with a glass front allowing a view of the action almost anywhere in the restaurant. And here’s the gimmick: each table is equipped with a set of headphones with which you can listen to radio exchanges between the control tower and the pilots. If you’re lucky, you get “Two-one-seven-four Juliet requests approach line squawk four one degrees vector west northwest…” (Alas, we didn’t happen to catch any aerial dogfights between Braniff and Southwest.) If you’re not of a surprise to find instead an elaborate replica of a French-farmhouse-turned-fort, just like in the movies. The building does sit beside a still-active Love Field runway with a glass front allowing a view of the action almost anywhere in the restaurant. And here’s the gimmick: each table is equipped with a set of headphones with which you can listen to radio exchanges between the control tower and the pilots. If you’re lucky, you get “Two-one-seven-four Juliet requests approach line squawk four one degrees vector west northwest…” (Alas, we didn’t happen to catch any aerial dogfights between Braniff and Southwest.) If you’re not lucky, you get silence (though you might respond to that if you’re not a big fan of “It’s A Long Way To Tipperary” or “Keep The Home Fires Burning” or “Over There” or the other war hits that are piped in to the dining room.

The food really isn’t the point here, so suffice it to say that the Steak Ricken-backer was better than K-rations and the fried zucchini was great though its authenticity is doubtful as it seems unlikely that our boys ever enjoyed zucchini as a trench treat. There was one special touch, though. When the cocktail waitress arrived, I asked for a “Dewar’s with a splash of water.” When she returned and set a beer in front of me, I reminded her that I’d ordered scotch. “Oh,” she said, “I thought you ordered a Coors with a splash of water.” We figured that was legitimate since beer was probably watered down in wartime economy. It’s those extra touches that win you over.



The Chicken Ranch of La Grange is surely the second most famous building in Texas. By all rights, it should have been made a historical shrine. Unfortunately, the Historical Designation Committee doesn’t move nearly so fast as the Dallas restaurant business. Thus, The Chicken Ranch is now on Greenville Avenue. Still, the idea of a. whorehouse as restaurant is rife with possibility, so our imaginations were spinning as we drove in. Waitresses in lingerie, maybe? lucky, you get silence (though you might respond to that if you’re not a big fan of “It’s A Long Way To Tipperary” or “Keep The Home Fires Burning” or “Over There” or the other war hits that are piped in to the dining room.

The food really isn’t the point here, so suffice it to say that the Steak Ricken-backer was better than K-rations and the fried zucchini was great though its authenticity is doubtful as it seems unlikely that our boys ever enjoyed zucchini as a trench treat. There was one special touch, though. When the cocktail waitress arrived, I asked for a “Dewar’s with a splash of water.” When she returned and set a beer in front of me, I reminded her that I’d ordered scotch. “Oh,” she said, “I thought you ordered a Coors with a splash of water.” We figured that was legitimate since beer was probably watered down in wartime economy. It’s those extra touches that win you over.



The Chicken Ranch of La Grange is surely the second most famous building in Texas. By all rights, it should have been made a historical shrine. Unfortunately, the Historical Designation Committee doesn’t move nearly so fast as the Dallas restaurant business. Thus, The Chicken Ranch is now on Greenville Avenue. Still, the idea of a. whorehouse as restaurant is rife with possibility, so our imaginations were spinning as we drove in. Waitresses in lingerie, maybe? Bedsheets for tablecloths, maybe? And the menu: “Madam’s Treat: Two luscious breasts” or maybe even “Breakfast-In-Bed?”

The first sign of trouble was the “Valet Parking Only.” If memory serves, valet parking wasn’t one of the options in La Grange. On the inside, the only costume was Chicken Ranch T-shirts. And then the clincher: backgammon tables. Backgammon? In a whorehouse? Even the menu scorned the rich heritage. Just straight old “Italian Chicken, Spanish Chicken, Mexican Chicken, Swiss Chicken, Chinese Chicken, Chicken Nachos, Chicken Livers …” Until, from out of nowhere, “A Dose of Crabs.” And that’s all. A traveler from Nebraska could wander in here, eat a plateful of “Chicken Pops” (which are, by the way, fantastic), and unless he wandered into the restroom and took in Miss Edna’s House Rules and Regulations which are reprinted on the walls (and which are, by the way, fantastic), the traveler could wander out and never realize that he’d dined in hallowed halls.

But understatement isn’t the byword Bedsheets for tablecloths, maybe? And the menu: “Madam’s Treat: Two luscious breasts” or maybe even “Breakfast-In-Bed?”

The first sign of trouble was the “Valet Parking Only.” If memory serves, valet parking wasn’t one of the options in La Grange. On the inside, the only costume was Chicken Ranch T-shirts. And then the clincher: backgammon tables. Backgammon? In a whorehouse? Even the menu scorned the rich heritage. Just straight old “Italian Chicken, Spanish Chicken, Mexican Chicken, Swiss Chicken, Chinese Chicken, Chicken Nachos, Chicken Livers …” Until, from out of nowhere, “A Dose of Crabs.” And that’s all. A traveler from Nebraska could wander in here, eat a plateful of “Chicken Pops” (which are, by the way, fantastic), and unless he wandered into the restroom and took in Miss Edna’s House Rules and Regulations which are reprinted on the walls (and which are, by the way, fantastic), the traveler could wander out and never realize that he’d dined in hallowed halls.

But understatement isn’t the byword in the restaurant-with-a-catch game. Now that a fort on a runway and an old whorehouse have been tried, you have to wonder what’s next. Since there seem to be no holds barred, it’s easy to speculate.

How about taking a U.S. Navy submarine and setting it in the Trinity River bottoms? They could serve long sandwiches and call the place, of course. The Sub Shop. And with a periscope at each table so you could spy on Oak Cliff.

Or how about a steak restaurant called The Slaughterhouse? Gimmick: Conveyor meat hook racks that swing the sides of beef right past your table. “Pick your own cow – Pick your own cut. ” Waiters could dress as butchers and do tableside custom carving.

Or how about dinner at A Day At The Races Restaurant? Horsetrack motif with betting windows where you place your in the restaurant-with-a-catch game. Now that a fort on a runway and an old whorehouse have been tried, you have to wonder what’s next. Since there seem to be no holds barred, it’s easy to speculate.

How about taking a U.S. Navy submarine and setting it in the Trinity River bottoms? They could serve long sandwiches and call the place, of course. The Sub Shop. And with a periscope at each table so you could spy on Oak Cliff.

Or how about a steak restaurant called The Slaughterhouse? Gimmick: Conveyor meat hook racks that swing the sides of beef right past your table. “Pick your own cow – Pick your own cut. ” Waiters could dress as butchers and do tableside custom carving.

Or how about dinner at A Day At The Races Restaurant? Horsetrack motif with betting windows where you place your order. At each window is the day’s menu with each entree listed with betting odds. For example, a cheeseburger might be listed at 2 to I at 500. Meaning that your chances were one in two of actually getting a cheeseburger. But if you did. 50¢ would be a pretty nifty price for a cheeseburger. Beef Wellington might be listed at 12 to 1 for $1.25. One chance in twelve that you’d actually get Beef Wellington, but if you hit, $1.25 would be a steal. After placing your order you would wait at your table until the waiter (who would of course be a midget dressed up as a jockey) brought your food – or your empty plate. And, in keeping with the spirit of the thing, one customer each night would be served The Daily Ringer, which would be a plate of horsemeat. Fun. huh?

Just kidding. Please, don’t anyone build one of these.

– David Bauer



Newcomers

Boque’s. Vincent Boque used to be Capitan order. At each window is the day’s menu with each entree listed with betting odds. For example, a cheeseburger might be listed at 2 to I at 500. Meaning that your chances were one in two of actually getting a cheeseburger. But if you did. 50¢ would be a pretty nifty price for a cheeseburger. Beef Wellington might be listed at 12 to 1 for $1.25. One chance in twelve that you’d actually get Beef Wellington, but if you hit, $1.25 would be a steal. After placing your order you would wait at your table until the waiter (who would of course be a midget dressed up as a jockey) brought your food – or your empty plate. And, in keeping with the spirit of the thing, one customer each night would be served The Daily Ringer, which would be a plate of horsemeat. Fun. huh?

Just kidding. Please, don’t anyone build one of these.

– David Bauer



Newcomers

Boque’s. Vincent Boque used to be Capitan of the Pyramid Room, and it shows. Fresh flowers, starched linen tablecloths, and brisk, attentive, yet pleasantly unobtrusive service. Any restaurant where waiters don’t insist that you keep your fork between courses gets a gold star. Boque’s deserves a few more. They serve an excellent pork and liver pate, made by Vincent’s wife Chely, and an equally fine gaz-pacho that isn’t ruined by too much seasoning. The onion soup is tasty but not especially memorable. The majority of the entrees are Spanish. Try the Fricandeau of Veal, thin scallops topped with dried chanterelles instead of those bland Safeway mushrooms. The paella is also excellent and more than enough to feed a troop of boy scouts. As for the fish dishes, well, it seems even a good restaurant can’t defeat geography. The filet of sole with baof the Pyramid Room, and it shows. Fresh flowers, starched linen tablecloths, and brisk, attentive, yet pleasantly unobtrusive service. Any restaurant where waiters don’t insist that you keep your fork between courses gets a gold star. Boque’s deserves a few more. They serve an excellent pork and liver pate, made by Vincent’s wife Chely, and an equally fine gaz-pacho that isn’t ruined by too much seasoning. The onion soup is tasty but not especially memorable. The majority of the entrees are Spanish. Try the Fricandeau of Veal, thin scallops topped with dried chanterelles instead of those bland Safeway mushrooms. The paella is also excellent and more than enough to feed a troop of boy scouts. As for the fish dishes, well, it seems even a good restaurant can’t defeat geography. The filet of sole with bananas was well-prepared but still rather tasteless. Best not to tempt fate here. For dessert there’s a luscious orange torte that will leave you several inches closer to the floor, and a fine selection of imported sherries, over which Vincent presides with ingratiating aplomb. In fact, he seems to preside over just about everything, so that when he isn’t clearing tables or decanting wine one suspects that he’s out front parking cars. Overall, a pleasant addition to Dallas’ growing list of continental restaurants. (210 Inwood Village/358-448I/Lunch: Man-Sal 11-2; Dinner: 5:30-11/CIosed Sun/Reservations/AE, MC. V/$$$)



Baron de Rothschild. It’s hard to believe anyone would name a restaurant Baron de Rothschild. But they did. And it’s hard to believe that anyone would revive the ill-fated location of the Oz restaurant with another restaurant. But they did. And it’s hard to believe, with these image problems, that they would decorate the facade with gaily painted nanas was well-prepared but still rather tasteless. Best not to tempt fate here. For dessert there’s a luscious orange torte that will leave you several inches closer to the floor, and a fine selection of imported sherries, over which Vincent presides with ingratiating aplomb. In fact, he seems to preside over just about everything, so that when he isn’t clearing tables or decanting wine one suspects that he’s out front parking cars. Overall, a pleasant addition to Dallas’ growing list of continental restaurants. (210 Inwood Village/358-448I/Lunch: Man-Sal 11-2; Dinner: 5:30-11/CIosed Sun/Reservations/AE, MC. V/$$$)



Baron de Rothschild. It’s hard to believe anyone would name a restaurant Baron de Rothschild. But they did. And it’s hard to believe that anyone would revive the ill-fated location of the Oz restaurant with another restaurant. But they did. And it’s hard to believe, with these image problems, that they would decorate the facade with gaily painted shields and crests and emblems that make the place look like a French used-car lot. But they did. With admittedly minimal expectations, then, we were relieved to find that this is not a horrible restaurant. In fact, it’s a quite competent restaurant that deserves a better name, a better location, and a better facade. The old Oz chrome-and-neon show has been replaced with wood paneling, smoked mirrors and chandeliers – not particularly imaginative, but pleasant enough. (The bar-disco half of the operation generally retains the Oz decor.) The menu is far-flung continental, very straightforward, with no innovative flourishes. Our samplings showed varied results. Fair: The veal picatta was dry and uninspired; the beef stroganoff was ordinary. Good: The fillet of sole was fresh and creative, but overdressed; the pepper steak was a gorgeous piece of meat, perfectly cooked, but with an overload of pepper. Excellent: The sweetbreads were unusually good, with an unusually heavy mushroom sauce that worked beautifully. The soups (onion, avocado, vichyssoise) were all very disappointing, but the salads were delightful. Dessert discovered a gaudy but great peach Melba. The best surprise was that even with a name like Baron de Rothschild, the service wasn’t stuffy; instead friendly. If they keep smiling maybe they’ll survive the rest of the image. (5429 LBJ Frwy near Montfortl 387-5700/ Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30; Dinner: Daily 6-11, Fri & Sal till midnight; bar till 2/Reservations/All credit cards /$$$)

shields and crests and emblems that make the place look like a French used-car lot. But they did. With admittedly minimal expectations, then, we were relieved to find that this is not a horrible restaurant. In fact, it’s a quite competent restaurant that deserves a better name, a better location, and a better facade. The old Oz chrome-and-neon show has been replaced with wood paneling, smoked mirrors and chandeliers – not particularly imaginative, but pleasant enough. (The bar-disco half of the operation generally retains the Oz decor.) The menu is far-flung continental, very straightforward, with no innovative flourishes. Our samplings showed varied results. Fair: The veal picatta was dry and uninspired; the beef stroganoff was ordinary. Good: The fillet of sole was fresh and creative, but overdressed; the pepper steak was a gorgeous piece of meat, perfectly cooked, but with an overload of pepper. Excellent: The sweetbreads were unusually good, with an unusually heavy mushroom sauce that worked beautifully. The soups (onion, avocado, vichyssoise) were all very disappointing, but the salads were delightful. Dessert discovered a gaudy but great peach Melba. The best surprise was that even with a name like Baron de Rothschild, the service wasn’t stuffy; instead friendly. If they keep smiling maybe they’ll survive the rest of the image. (5429 LBJ Frwy near Montfortl 387-5700/ Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30; Dinner: Daily 6-11, Fri & Sal till midnight; bar till 2/Reservations/All credit cards /$$$)

Greenville Avenue Bar & Grill. You’ll notice that the “Bar” comes before the “Grill.” That’s important to note before you visit, just so you won’t have any wrong expectations. This is first and foremost a bar; they claim, in fact, that it’s the oldest bar in Dallas – and whether it is or not, it’s an intriguing old place with a terrific high-stooled wooden bar and a wonderful high-ceilinged spaciousness. When the spaciousness is filled with people, as on weekend nights, the place has a distinctive conviviality, mainly because it Greenville Avenue Bar & Grill. You’ll notice that the “Bar” comes before the “Grill.” That’s important to note before you visit, just so you won’t have any wrong expectations. This is first and foremost a bar; they claim, in fact, that it’s the oldest bar in Dallas – and whether it is or not, it’s an intriguing old place with a terrific high-stooled wooden bar and a wonderful high-ceilinged spaciousness. When the spaciousness is filled with people, as on weekend nights, the place has a distinctive conviviality, mainly because it fills a lower Greenville-East Dallas void as upbeat neighborhood bar, much as its sister bar, the Stoneleigh P., does on the other side of town. Unfortunately, lower Greenville Avenue is still a wasteland of chopped concrete, dust and rubble as street construction here dribbles along at its ridiculously slow pace – a detriment to old and new establishments alike along this strip. As for the “Grill,” this is serve-your-self bar food – pretty good, but still just bar food. An order of crab claws, for example, makes a nifty snack, but fills a lower Greenville-East Dallas void as upbeat neighborhood bar, much as its sister bar, the Stoneleigh P., does on the other side of town. Unfortunately, lower Greenville Avenue is still a wasteland of chopped concrete, dust and rubble as street construction here dribbles along at its ridiculously slow pace – a detriment to old and new establishments alike along this strip. As for the “Grill,” this is serve-your-self bar food – pretty good, but still just bar food. An order of crab claws, for example, makes a nifty snack, but isn’t (and isn’t intended to be) an elegant seafood dinner. Good burgers, very nice broiled chicken breast (bad rice), and undistinguished gumbo. But the “Bar” is the point, and this can become a great gathering spot for a neighborhood that needs it – if the construction people will just get that maddening street fixed. (2821 Greenville at Vickery/823-0834/Mon-Thur 11 a.m.-1 a.m., Fri & Sat til 2 a.m.. Sun noon-1 a.m./No reservations/No credit cards/$)

isn’t (and isn’t intended to be) an elegant seafood dinner. Good burgers, very nice broiled chicken breast (bad rice), and undistinguished gumbo. But the “Bar” is the point, and this can become a great gathering spot for a neighborhood that needs it – if the construction people will just get that maddening street fixed. (2821 Greenville at Vickery/823-0834/Mon-Thur 11 a.m.-1 a.m., Fri & Sat til 2 a.m.. Sun noon-1 a.m./No reservations/No credit cards/$)

The Spirits of Christmas Present

The Spirits of Christmas Present

Ties with other lands, other times, continue to be strong in the lives of many local citizens, especially at Christmas. In the holiday spirit several of the area’s residents have shared their cherished festive drink recipes with us. We’ve also added a few choice concoctions from some offbeat but fabulous recipe books.



Bahamian

Mollye Hubbard of the Bahamas Tourist Office offers these Christmas delights, which are served during the winter festival of Junkanoo:



Junkanoo Rum Punch

1 ounce fresh lime concentrate

1 ounce sugar syrup

1 ounces light rum

A dash of Angostura bitters

Add grenadine for color and serve with fresh fruit garnish.



Junkanoo Smash

1 1/2 ounces light rum

Ties with other lands, other times, continue to be strong in the lives of many local citizens, especially at Christmas. In the holiday spirit several of the area’s residents have shared their cherished festive drink recipes with us. We’ve also added a few choice concoctions from some offbeat but fabulous recipe books.



Bahamian

Mollye Hubbard of the Bahamas Tourist Office offers these Christmas delights, which are served during the winter festival of Junkanoo:



Junkanoo Rum Punch

1 ounce fresh lime concentrate

1 ounce sugar syrup

1 ounces light rum

A dash of Angostura bitters

Add grenadine for color and serve with fresh fruit garnish.



Junkanoo Smash

1 1/2 ounces light rum

3/4 ounce coconut rum

1/2 teaspoon sugar

3 ounces pineapple juice

1/4 ounce lemon juice



Shake or stir well; serve in a tall glass over crushed ice. Garnish with a cherry and/or orange slice.



English

Wassail Cup, furnished by Louise Blackburn, British Tourist Authority. Recipe by Denis Curtis.

3 quarts beer

1 pound brown sugar Good pinch of nutmeg and powdered ginger

1 stick of cinnamon

2 thinly sliced lemons

1 bottle medium dry sherry

Heat 1 quart of beer till frothy. Add sugar and cinnamon and heat till sugar dissolves (it should not get hot). Add the other spices, lemons, sherry, and the remaining beer, in that order. Serve warm. 3/4 ounce coconut rum

1/2 teaspoon sugar

3 ounces pineapple juice

1/4 ounce lemon juice



Shake or stir well; serve in a tall glass over crushed ice. Garnish with a cherry and/or orange slice.



English

Wassail Cup, furnished by Louise Blackburn, British Tourist Authority. Recipe by Denis Curtis.

3 quarts beer

1 pound brown sugar Good pinch of nutmeg and powdered ginger

1 stick of cinnamon

2 thinly sliced lemons

1 bottle medium dry sherry

Heat 1 quart of beer till frothy. Add sugar and cinnamon and heat till sugar dissolves (it should not get hot). Add the other spices, lemons, sherry, and the remaining beer, in that order. Serve warm. with small roasted apples floating on the surface.



French



Christmas Burgundy, contributed by Charles Bonnie, waiter, Patry’s Restaurant.

1 bottle Burgundy

1 sliced apple

1 bar cinnamon

Sugar to taste and a twist of orange

Boil all ingredients thoroughly and serve in tea cups. This is a favorite in France after Midnight Mass. In a pinch, Bordeaux can be used instead of Burgundy.



Parakeet, offered by Marcel Chaber-naud, proprietor, Marcel’s Restaurant Francais.

4 ounces Pastis Ricard (a French liqueur,

available at Marty’s Liquor Store)

1 ounce crème de menthe

3 ounces water

Stir and serve over ice. For variety, Mr. Chabemaud says that grenadine can be substituted for the crème de menthe. This alternative concoction is called a Tomato.

with small roasted apples floating on the surface.



French



Christmas Burgundy, contributed by Charles Bonnie, waiter, Patry’s Restaurant.

1 bottle Burgundy

1 sliced apple

1 bar cinnamon

Sugar to taste and a twist of orange

Boil all ingredients thoroughly and serve in tea cups. This is a favorite in France after Midnight Mass. In a pinch, Bordeaux can be used instead of Burgundy.



Parakeet, offered by Marcel Chaber-naud, proprietor, Marcel’s Restaurant Francais.

4 ounces Pastis Ricard (a French liqueur,

available at Marty’s Liquor Store)

1 ounce crème de menthe

3 ounces water

Stir and serve over ice. For variety, Mr. Chabemaud says that grenadine can be substituted for the crème de menthe. This alternative concoction is called a Tomato.

German

Krambambuli, suggested by Ewald Sholz, proprietor, Ewald’s Restaurant.

2 bottles light red wine

Juice of 2 lemons

Juice of 2 oranges

3 cups rum

1 sugar loaf, or 2 1/2 cups of sugar lumps

This recipe will bomb 6 to 10 people. Pour the wine in a copper bowl. Heat, but do not boil. Add juices. Warm rum separately. Place sugar loaf on tongs over copper bowl. Soak sugar with rum and light. (Makes a nice show in a dark room.) Special krambambuli bowls, tongs and sugar loaves are available at Kuby’s, or if you prefer, use any heat resistant bowl, metal grill, and sugar lumps.



German Egg Nog, furnished by Lena Schliepake Ryan, part-owner. Blue Front Restaurant.

1 dozen eggs

1 cup of sugar

1 pint of whipping cream

German

Krambambuli, suggested by Ewald Sholz, proprietor, Ewald’s Restaurant.

2 bottles light red wine

Juice of 2 lemons

Juice of 2 oranges

3 cups rum

1 sugar loaf, or 2 1/2 cups of sugar lumps

This recipe will bomb 6 to 10 people. Pour the wine in a copper bowl. Heat, but do not boil. Add juices. Warm rum separately. Place sugar loaf on tongs over copper bowl. Soak sugar with rum and light. (Makes a nice show in a dark room.) Special krambambuli bowls, tongs and sugar loaves are available at Kuby’s, or if you prefer, use any heat resistant bowl, metal grill, and sugar lumps.



German Egg Nog, furnished by Lena Schliepake Ryan, part-owner. Blue Front Restaurant.

1 dozen eggs

1 cup of sugar

1 pint of whipping cream

2 teaspoons vanilla

nutmeg/milk/whiskey

Separate eggs; beat yolks till creamy. Add sugar and vanilla: beat till dissolved. Add beaten egg white, mix well, then add cream that has been whipped. Serve in punch cups. Add whiskey to taste, a small amount of milk and top with nutmeg. Mrs. Ryan says that the whiskey is added later, rather than mixed in the bowl, because Mother Schliepake allowed her children only a drop in each cup.



Irish



Hot Toddy, furnished by Nick Farrelly, NFL Bar.

1 half cup Irish Whiskey

1 half cup water

A few cloves

Heat thoroughly and serve. Nothing fancy here.

Mr. Farrelly says that contrary to popular opinion, Irish Coffee is not big in Ireland among the serious drinkers. Maybe in the afternoon, but by evening it’s down to business.

2 teaspoons vanilla

nutmeg/milk/whiskey

Separate eggs; beat yolks till creamy. Add sugar and vanilla: beat till dissolved. Add beaten egg white, mix well, then add cream that has been whipped. Serve in punch cups. Add whiskey to taste, a small amount of milk and top with nutmeg. Mrs. Ryan says that the whiskey is added later, rather than mixed in the bowl, because Mother Schliepake allowed her children only a drop in each cup.



Irish



Hot Toddy, furnished by Nick Farrelly, NFL Bar.

1 half cup Irish Whiskey

1 half cup water

A few cloves

Heat thoroughly and serve. Nothing fancy here.

Mr. Farrelly says that contrary to popular opinion, Irish Coffee is not big in Ireland among the serious drinkers. Maybe in the afternoon, but by evening it’s down to business.

Italian



Cafe Medallion, contributed by Mario Messina, proprietor, II Sorrento Restaurant.

1 or 2 scoops chocolate ice cream

2 ounces Cafe Espresso (or other coffee-based liqueur)

1 ounce Cointreau

2 ounces cream

Mix and pour into tall glass. Top with whipped cream. Decorate with nutmeg, chocolate curls or grated orange peel.



Principe di Piemonte, contributed by Alberto Lombardi, proprietor, Lom-bardi’s Restaurant.

2 ounces vodka

Juice of 1/2 orange

1/2 ounce Grand Marnier

1/2 ounce Campari

Shake and serve over ice. Garnish with a cherry.



Jamaican



Jamaican Dream, suggested by Leo Italian



Cafe Medallion, contributed by Mario Messina, proprietor, II Sorrento Restaurant.

1 or 2 scoops chocolate ice cream

2 ounces Cafe Espresso (or other coffee-based liqueur)

1 ounce Cointreau

2 ounces cream

Mix and pour into tall glass. Top with whipped cream. Decorate with nutmeg, chocolate curls or grated orange peel.



Principe di Piemonte, contributed by Alberto Lombardi, proprietor, Lom-bardi’s Restaurant.

2 ounces vodka

Juice of 1/2 orange

1/2 ounce Grand Marnier

1/2 ounce Campari

Shake and serve over ice. Garnish with a cherry.



Jamaican



Jamaican Dream, suggested by Leo Villa, bartender. Cattleman’s Restaurant. 2 ounces 151 proof rum 8 ounces milk, sufficiently warmed Blend for 10 seconds and pour into warm glass. Place I or 2 cubes of sugar on a spoon. Douse with rum and light. The instant the fire goes out, let the sugar slide off of the spoon into the drink.



Mexican

Rompope, contributed by Juan Suarez, Mariano’s Restaurant.

4 egg yolks

8 ounces light rum (or less, depending on your capacity)

6 ounces condensed milk

6 ounces evaporated milk

Shake well, but do not use blender. Pour a slight amount of Rose’s Grenadine in the bottom of a glass (1/4 ounce at the most), then pour in egg-rum-milk mixture. Can also be served hot.



Polynesian

Hot Buttered Rum, recommended by Warren Chow, manager. Trader Vic’s Restaurant.

Okay, so this one may not have origVilla, bartender. Cattleman’s Restaurant. 2 ounces 151 proof rum 8 ounces milk, sufficiently warmed Blend for 10 seconds and pour into warm glass. Place I or 2 cubes of sugar on a spoon. Douse with rum and light. The instant the fire goes out, let the sugar slide off of the spoon into the drink.



Mexican

Rompope, contributed by Juan Suarez, Mariano’s Restaurant.

4 egg yolks

8 ounces light rum (or less, depending on your capacity)

6 ounces condensed milk

6 ounces evaporated milk

Shake well, but do not use blender. Pour a slight amount of Rose’s Grenadine in the bottom of a glass (1/4 ounce at the most), then pour in egg-rum-milk mixture. Can also be served hot.



Polynesian

Hot Buttered Rum, recommended by Warren Chow, manager. Trader Vic’s Restaurant.

Okay, so this one may not have originated in the exact geographical center of Polynesia, but Trader Vic’s still serves the best. Here’s how to make your own, straight from Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide.

1 heaping teaspoon hot buttered rum batter (see below)

1 1/2 ounces light rum

Boiling water

Put batter into preheated mug. add mm. then fill with water. Stir well.

To make the batter, combine a pound of brown sugar. 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon each of ground nutmeg, cloves, and cinnamon. Add a pinch of salt. Beat sugar and 1/4 pound butter together until thoroughly creamed and fluffy, then beat in other-ingredients.

– Tom Peeler

inated in the exact geographical center of Polynesia, but Trader Vic’s still serves the best. Here’s how to make your own, straight from Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide.

1 heaping teaspoon hot buttered rum batter (see below)

1 1/2 ounces light rum

Boiling water

Put batter into preheated mug. add mm. then fill with water. Stir well.

To make the batter, combine a pound of brown sugar. 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon each of ground nutmeg, cloves, and cinnamon. Add a pinch of salt. Beat sugar and 1/4 pound butter together until thoroughly creamed and fluffy, then beat in other-ingredients.

– Tom Peeler

Recommended Restaurants



These restaurants represent the best in Dallas dining. It is implicit then that we recommend all of them highly.

These listings are revised and supplemented periodically Visits by our critics are made anonymously to avoid preferential treatment. Inclusion in this directory has nothing whatever to do with paid advertising.

The pricing symbols used are categorical, not precise They are intended only to indicate a general price range.

$ – Generally inexpensive. Usually indicates a good value.

$$ – Middle ground and very general. Usually indicates a menu with a wide price range.

$$$ – Expensive. You can expect to spend more than $10 for a complete meal excluding wine and cocktails.

$$$$ – Very expensive

Unless otherwise noted, all restaurants have full bar facilities.

Credit card notations: MC – Master Charge / BA – BankAmericard / AE – American Express / DC – Diner’s Club / CB – Carte Blanche/ “All Credit Cards” indicates that all the above are accepted.



Continental

Arthur’s. Once a rustic steakhogse. now a shimmerina beef Recommended Restaurants



These restaurants represent the best in Dallas dining. It is implicit then that we recommend all of them highly.

These listings are revised and supplemented periodically Visits by our critics are made anonymously to avoid preferential treatment. Inclusion in this directory has nothing whatever to do with paid advertising.

The pricing symbols used are categorical, not precise They are intended only to indicate a general price range.

$ – Generally inexpensive. Usually indicates a good value.

$$ – Middle ground and very general. Usually indicates a menu with a wide price range.

$$$ – Expensive. You can expect to spend more than $10 for a complete meal excluding wine and cocktails.

$$$$ – Very expensive

Unless otherwise noted, all restaurants have full bar facilities.

Credit card notations: MC – Master Charge / BA – BankAmericard / AE – American Express / DC – Diner’s Club / CB – Carte Blanche/ “All Credit Cards” indicates that all the above are accepted.



Continental

Arthur’s. Once a rustic steakhogse. now a shimmerina beef palace Steak remains the pillar of the operation, but other options abound lamb chops, veal chops, and calf’s liver to name a lew favorites American wines only – an intriguing and imaginative touch Warm and classy with one of Dallas best bars. Live entertainment. (1000 Campbell Centrel361-8833ILunch Mon-Fri 11:30-2. Dinner: Daily 6-11, Sat till midnightl Reservations/All credit cards/$$$)

Bagatelle. This stylish restaurant has always delighted us with its atmosphere, but never overwhelmed us with its food. The kitchen is competent but not dazzling. One standout is the tournedos cafe royale.” The new menu also features a rich and intriguing pheasant under glass, but you’ll have to decide whether you want to pay that much for any entree. Service is sometimes well-paced, sometimes not. The companion Plaza Cafe has a rather windy outdoor dining area, and a pleasant indoor one. The food there is nothing exceptional, but it’s a nice place for a snack and a drink if you re on Greenville and don’t want to fend off singles. (One Energy Square. Greenville at Universityl692-8224l8agatelle Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30-2 30. Dinner Sun-Thur 6-10. Fri & Sat till 11. bar till 2. Plaza: Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30. Dinner Mon-Sat 6-mid-mghtlReservationslMC.V,AE,DCI$$$-$$)

Brasserie. The most elegant “coffee shop” in town In the wee hours of the morning (they’re open 24 hours), stop by to treat yourself to Dallas’ best Eggs Benedict – sprinkled with truffles (at 3 a.m. they bother?), or a sandwich of sirloin on crisp, buttery French bread During the other hours, especially lunch, the fare is mostly overpriced and undistinguished (Fairmont Hotel. Ross & Akard 748-5454/24 hours, seven days a weekl No reservationslMC, V, AE, DCI$$)

Calluaud. One of Dallas’ most civilized restaurants. Set in a small frame house.with a casual yet intimate atmosphere complemented by consistently fine French foods. Superb soups and excellent omelettes, and desserts not to be missed simple and wonderful fruit tarts (try the apple) and exquisite profiteroles The imaginative dinner menu changes frequently but recently featured a fabulous roast duck and Guy Calluaud’s superb Veau Normande. For lunch, the filet of sole is an excellent alternative if for some reason you want to pass up the omelettes. Prices are a bargain for the quality. It’s easy to get hooked on this place. (2917 Fairmount off Cedar Springs/742-8525/ Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Dinner: Mon-Fri palace Steak remains the pillar of the operation, but other options abound lamb chops, veal chops, and calf’s liver to name a lew favorites American wines only – an intriguing and imaginative touch Warm and classy with one of Dallas best bars. Live entertainment. (1000 Campbell Centrel361-8833ILunch Mon-Fri 11:30-2. Dinner: Daily 6-11, Sat till midnightl Reservations/All credit cards/$$$)

Bagatelle. This stylish restaurant has always delighted us with its atmosphere, but never overwhelmed us with its food. The kitchen is competent but not dazzling. One standout is the tournedos cafe royale.” The new menu also features a rich and intriguing pheasant under glass, but you’ll have to decide whether you want to pay that much for any entree. Service is sometimes well-paced, sometimes not. The companion Plaza Cafe has a rather windy outdoor dining area, and a pleasant indoor one. The food there is nothing exceptional, but it’s a nice place for a snack and a drink if you re on Greenville and don’t want to fend off singles. (One Energy Square. Greenville at Universityl692-8224l8agatelle Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30-2 30. Dinner Sun-Thur 6-10. Fri & Sat till 11. bar till 2. Plaza: Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30. Dinner Mon-Sat 6-mid-mghtlReservationslMC.V,AE,DCI$$$-$$)

Brasserie. The most elegant “coffee shop” in town In the wee hours of the morning (they’re open 24 hours), stop by to treat yourself to Dallas’ best Eggs Benedict – sprinkled with truffles (at 3 a.m. they bother?), or a sandwich of sirloin on crisp, buttery French bread During the other hours, especially lunch, the fare is mostly overpriced and undistinguished (Fairmont Hotel. Ross & Akard 748-5454/24 hours, seven days a weekl No reservationslMC, V, AE, DCI$$)

Calluaud. One of Dallas’ most civilized restaurants. Set in a small frame house.with a casual yet intimate atmosphere complemented by consistently fine French foods. Superb soups and excellent omelettes, and desserts not to be missed simple and wonderful fruit tarts (try the apple) and exquisite profiteroles The imaginative dinner menu changes frequently but recently featured a fabulous roast duck and Guy Calluaud’s superb Veau Normande. For lunch, the filet of sole is an excellent alternative if for some reason you want to pass up the omelettes. Prices are a bargain for the quality. It’s easy to get hooked on this place. (2917 Fairmount off Cedar Springs/742-8525/ Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Dinner: Mon-Fri 6:30-10:30; Sat till 11, closed SunlReservationslMC. V. AEI$$$)

Chablls. An odd little French restaurant, difficult to put your finger on – the style is neither elegant nor quaint But the food, while in some instances overpriced, is decidedly good A tasty complimentary rillettes, a fine pepper steak, and a subtly glazed roast duckling are highlights. Light flaky bread (with a very “French” flavor) and the sweetest, richest chocolate mousse in town (120 Quadrangle, 2800 Routhl522-0910IMon-Thur 6-11. Fri & Sat till midnight: closed SunlReservations on weedendslMC. V. AE, DCI$$$)

Chateaubriand. A wide-ranging menu, with everything from sweetbreads to frog legs to lobster to veal parmigiana. and a high percentage of it is quite well-executed The standouts, interestingly, are the Greek specialties try/the pastitsa and dolma appetizer and the “Greek veal” in a6:30-10:30; Sat till 11, closed SunlReservationslMC. V. AEI$$$)

Chablls. An odd little French restaurant, difficult to put your finger on – the style is neither elegant nor quaint But the food, while in some instances overpriced, is decidedly good A tasty complimentary rillettes, a fine pepper steak, and a subtly glazed roast duckling are highlights. Light flaky bread (with a very “French” flavor) and the sweetest, richest chocolate mousse in town (120 Quadrangle, 2800 Routhl522-0910IMon-Thur 6-11. Fri & Sat till midnight: closed SunlReservations on weedendslMC. V. AE, DCI$$$)

Chateaubriand. A wide-ranging menu, with everything from sweetbreads to frog legs to lobster to veal parmigiana. and a high percentage of it is quite well-executed The standouts, interestingly, are the Greek specialties try/the pastitsa and dolma appetizer and the “Greek veal” in apleasant lemon-butter-oregano sauce Chateaubriand’s old-fashioned overdressed style is not to all tastes, but service is attentive and the place is comfortable Lunch is nothing special (2515 McKinney/741-l223/Mon-Sat 11:30 a.m. -midnight/Reservations/AII credit cards/$$$)

pleasant lemon-butter-oregano sauce Chateaubriand’s old-fashioned overdressed style is not to all tastes, but service is attentive and the place is comfortable Lunch is nothing special (2515 McKinney/741-l223/Mon-Sat 11:30 a.m. -midnight/Reservations/AII credit cards/$$$)

D REVISITS



Le Bistro. A change of management and a change of menu gave us hope that Le Bistro might finally become the restaurant we want it to be. There’s no more inviting place in town than this simple but sophisticated renovation of an old Oak Lawn house. But there’s still something lacking in the kitchen. The appetizers on recent visits were nice – well prepared escargots. and the intriguing “Poivrons farcis à la Paul Bocuse.” green pepper rings with a cream cheese and herb stuffing (though it doesn’t quite live up to the promise it makes by invoking the sacred name Bocuse). And the “Salade Le Bistro, “with its embarrassing richness of avocado and fresh mushrooms, is excellent even though the dressing errs by being slightly bland. But then came the disappointments: a creamy but too salty vichyssoise, a pepper steak with a too heavy, too peppery sauce and a dryish piece of beef, and an over-cooked filet of sole topped with under-cooked mushrooms. Another visit presented us with a greasy, unappetizing roast duck. Sigh. Service was nearly perfect, responding to our desire to keep things coming slowly while dealing efficiently with the impatient patrons at the next table – a prince of a waiter. We’ll keep going back to Le Bistro because it’s impossible not to like the place and to wish them well in their attempts. And maybe some day they’ll click. Other people obviously feel well-disposed to it, too; reservations are a must (3716 Bowser, just off Oak Lawn/528-4181 /Tue-Thur 6-/0, Fri & Sat 6-11, Sun 6-10/Reservations/MC, V.AE/$S$)

D REVISITS



Le Bistro. A change of management and a change of menu gave us hope that Le Bistro might finally become the restaurant we want it to be. There’s no more inviting place in town than this simple but sophisticated renovation of an old Oak Lawn house. But there’s still something lacking in the kitchen. The appetizers on recent visits were nice – well prepared escargots. and the intriguing “Poivrons farcis à la Paul Bocuse.” green pepper rings with a cream cheese and herb stuffing (though it doesn’t quite live up to the promise it makes by invoking the sacred name Bocuse). And the “Salade Le Bistro, “with its embarrassing richness of avocado and fresh mushrooms, is excellent even though the dressing errs by being slightly bland. But then came the disappointments: a creamy but too salty vichyssoise, a pepper steak with a too heavy, too peppery sauce and a dryish piece of beef, and an over-cooked filet of sole topped with under-cooked mushrooms. Another visit presented us with a greasy, unappetizing roast duck. Sigh. Service was nearly perfect, responding to our desire to keep things coming slowly while dealing efficiently with the impatient patrons at the next table – a prince of a waiter. We’ll keep going back to Le Bistro because it’s impossible not to like the place and to wish them well in their attempts. And maybe some day they’ll click. Other people obviously feel well-disposed to it, too; reservations are a must (3716 Bowser, just off Oak Lawn/528-4181 /Tue-Thur 6-/0, Fri & Sat 6-11, Sun 6-10/Reservations/MC, V.AE/$S$)

The Chimney. An unpretentious Swiss-Austrian restaurant that specializes in excellent veal, ranging from a simple lemon veal to more extravagant preparations. Also one of the few places where you can have venison And for dessert, have the excellent home-made cheesecake At lunch, the fare is strictly ladies’ tearoom, though it’s one of the best of its kind. Attentive service, and a nice atmosphere (though the piano is placed too close to some of the tables to make conversation comfortable). (Willow Creek, 9739 N Cen Expwy at Walnut Hill/369-6466/Lunch: Tue-Sat 11:30-2; Dinner: Tue-Sun 6-10:30, Sun brunch 11-2/Reservations/MC, AE, DC/$$$)

Ewald’s. Loyal regulars flock to this old standard, whose decor and menu have changed very little over the years. The style is sort of continental home-cooking: more hearty than delicate, more homey than classy. The veal is excellent, though some preparations are over-embellished. Try the veal Papagallo with Canadian bacon and Swiss cheese or the veal Picatta-Milanese Excellent pepper steak and “Tenderloin Tips a la Ewald.” And a rarity – well-prepared fresh vegetables. Have a side order of spaetzli if your entree doesn’t come with it, and conclude with the Black Forest cake. No friIIs, but few disappointThe Chimney. An unpretentious Swiss-Austrian restaurant that specializes in excellent veal, ranging from a simple lemon veal to more extravagant preparations. Also one of the few places where you can have venison And for dessert, have the excellent home-made cheesecake At lunch, the fare is strictly ladies’ tearoom, though it’s one of the best of its kind. Attentive service, and a nice atmosphere (though the piano is placed too close to some of the tables to make conversation comfortable). (Willow Creek, 9739 N Cen Expwy at Walnut Hill/369-6466/Lunch: Tue-Sat 11:30-2; Dinner: Tue-Sun 6-10:30, Sun brunch 11-2/Reservations/MC, AE, DC/$$$)

Ewald’s. Loyal regulars flock to this old standard, whose decor and menu have changed very little over the years. The style is sort of continental home-cooking: more hearty than delicate, more homey than classy. The veal is excellent, though some preparations are over-embellished. Try the veal Papagallo with Canadian bacon and Swiss cheese or the veal Picatta-Milanese Excellent pepper steak and “Tenderloin Tips a la Ewald.” And a rarity – well-prepared fresh vegetables. Have a side order of spaetzli if your entree doesn’t come with it, and conclude with the Black Forest cake. No friIIs, but few disappointments, either (5415 W Lovers Ln/357-1622/Mon-Fri 6-10:30, Sat 6-11/Reservations/MC, V/$$$)The Grape. An old favorite with some new delights, especially at lunch, which has become more adventurous. The beef dishes, particularly the tournedos béarnaise and the boeuf à la mode, are outstanding. Other delights are the escargots aux champignons and the omelette aux crevettes chinoise (with shrimp, mushrooms, and bean sprouts). The mushroom soup is famous, but the potage au Tripoli, a chickpea soup with herbs and spices, is a new winner. Still hard to beat tor the money. (2808 Greenville Avenue/823-0133/Lunch: Non-Fri 11:30-2; Dinner: Tue-Sun, 6-10:30. open later on Fri & Sat tor wine and cheese only/No reservations/MC, V/$$)



D REVISITS

La Cave. A snug L-shaped room on Henderson that is becoming a favorite spot with Dallas oeno-philes. Nothing particularly elaborate here except the cellar, which contains everything from reliable imported jug wines to racks of Lafites and Latours The Meursault Rouge is a special treat, as is the Verdillac. The latter just happens to come from the family vineyard, so you can understand why Francois pushes it a bit. The attraction of a wine bar is the chance to buy different wines by the glass. If you like what you’re tasting you can buy a bottle to drink or take home; if you don’t, you can always switch to something else. The only problem with this is that after a few glasses you need food to stay upright. Although La Cave has good salads and sandwiches, an outstanding paté, and a nice selection of imments, either (5415 W Lovers Ln/357-1622/Mon-Fri 6-10:30, Sat 6-11/Reservations/MC, V/$$$)The Grape. An old favorite with some new delights, especially at lunch, which has become more adventurous. The beef dishes, particularly the tournedos béarnaise and the boeuf à la mode, are outstanding. Other delights are the escargots aux champignons and the omelette aux crevettes chinoise (with shrimp, mushrooms, and bean sprouts). The mushroom soup is famous, but the potage au Tripoli, a chickpea soup with herbs and spices, is a new winner. Still hard to beat tor the money. (2808 Greenville Avenue/823-0133/Lunch: Non-Fri 11:30-2; Dinner: Tue-Sun, 6-10:30. open later on Fri & Sat tor wine and cheese only/No reservations/MC, V/$$)



D REVISITS

La Cave. A snug L-shaped room on Henderson that is becoming a favorite spot with Dallas oeno-philes. Nothing particularly elaborate here except the cellar, which contains everything from reliable imported jug wines to racks of Lafites and Latours The Meursault Rouge is a special treat, as is the Verdillac. The latter just happens to come from the family vineyard, so you can understand why Francois pushes it a bit. The attraction of a wine bar is the chance to buy different wines by the glass. If you like what you’re tasting you can buy a bottle to drink or take home; if you don’t, you can always switch to something else. The only problem with this is that after a few glasses you need food to stay upright. Although La Cave has good salads and sandwiches, an outstanding paté, and a nice selection of imported cheeses (try the Brie and the Mimolette), everything tends to be on the light side. By the time you’ve eased your hunger pangs you’ve also run a hefty tab. The menu could use at least one hearty main dish for ballast. An altogether congenial and civilized place. (2926 N. Hen-derson/826-2190IMon-Fri 11 a.m. to midnight. Sat until 1 a.m.I No reservations/ MC, VI$).



Marcel’s. Marcel is a charming host in the classic French tradition, it’s that French feeling that has made this a long-popular restaurant That and a complete table d’ note dinner for only $6.50 – not the finest French cuisine in the city but certainly the best priced. Beef Wellington is the house specialty, but the real star may be the coq au vin. Relaxed, quiet dining (5721 W Lovers Lnl358-2103 ISun-Thur 6-10:30, Fri & Sat till midnight. Closed Monl ReservationslMC, V, AE, DCI$$)

Mr. Peppe. Old-timers swear by it, and it was once one of the best restaurants in Dallas. But the years have not been kind, and you may find it drab rather than cozy The key word in recent years has been “inconsistency” When this restaurant is good, it’s very, very good. And fortunately it’s never terribly bad Try the pepper steak, which is stunningly seasoned, and the excellent desserts, otherwise, take your chances – and good luck (5617 W Lovers Ln/352 5976/Mon-Sal6- 10IReservations/MC, V, AE, DC/ $$$)

Old Warsaw. The “new Old Warsaw” – after some tasteful remodeling of the interior and some successful revampported cheeses (try the Brie and the Mimolette), everything tends to be on the light side. By the time you’ve eased your hunger pangs you’ve also run a hefty tab. The menu could use at least one hearty main dish for ballast. An altogether congenial and civilized place. (2926 N. Hen-derson/826-2190IMon-Fri 11 a.m. to midnight. Sat until 1 a.m.I No reservations/ MC, VI$).



Marcel’s. Marcel is a charming host in the classic French tradition, it’s that French feeling that has made this a long-popular restaurant That and a complete table d’ note dinner for only $6.50 – not the finest French cuisine in the city but certainly the best priced. Beef Wellington is the house specialty, but the real star may be the coq au vin. Relaxed, quiet dining (5721 W Lovers Lnl358-2103 ISun-Thur 6-10:30, Fri & Sat till midnight. Closed Monl ReservationslMC, V, AE, DCI$$)

Mr. Peppe. Old-timers swear by it, and it was once one of the best restaurants in Dallas. But the years have not been kind, and you may find it drab rather than cozy The key word in recent years has been “inconsistency” When this restaurant is good, it’s very, very good. And fortunately it’s never terribly bad Try the pepper steak, which is stunningly seasoned, and the excellent desserts, otherwise, take your chances – and good luck (5617 W Lovers Ln/352 5976/Mon-Sal6- 10IReservations/MC, V, AE, DC/ $$$)

Old Warsaw. The “new Old Warsaw” – after some tasteful remodeling of the interior and some successful revamping of the menu – is on the upswing. The place is less gilded, more engaging. The new menu is less erratic, more interesting. New treats: a pate of duck, crème de Cresson (puree of watercress), and a splendid Cote de Veau. Also a nightly selection of “Nouvelle Cuisine,” the reduced-calorie style popularized by Paul Bocuse. The prices were not remodeled – still very expensive – but now the paying is less painful. (2510 Maple/528-0032/Daily 6-11, Sat till midnight/Reservations/MC, V, AE,DC/$$$$)

Patry’s. When the Patry family is at work, you can’t go wrong. Start with the poireaux farcis (stuffed leeks) or the delicate, light, near-perfect vichyssoise, then have any of the superb entrees a wonderful coq au vin, a filet in a flawless béarnaise, or their splendid escalope of veal. The place itself is a bit sterile except for their terrific – and very French – little bar. (2504 McKinney/748-3754/ Tue-Fri, 6-11, Sat till 11:30/Reservations/MC,BA,AE,DC/ $$$).

Pyramid Room. The classiest dining room in Dallas – an aura of affluence and impeccable taste. A paragon of service – absolutely professional but without pomposity, including a theatrical sommelier. A dizzying dinner menu of French specialties of the highest order (lunch is less ing of the menu – is on the upswing. The place is less gilded, more engaging. The new menu is less erratic, more interesting. New treats: a pate of duck, crème de Cresson (puree of watercress), and a splendid Cote de Veau. Also a nightly selection of “Nouvelle Cuisine,” the reduced-calorie style popularized by Paul Bocuse. The prices were not remodeled – still very expensive – but now the paying is less painful. (2510 Maple/528-0032/Daily 6-11, Sat till midnight/Reservations/MC, V, AE,DC/$$$$)

Patry’s. When the Patry family is at work, you can’t go wrong. Start with the poireaux farcis (stuffed leeks) or the delicate, light, near-perfect vichyssoise, then have any of the superb entrees a wonderful coq au vin, a filet in a flawless béarnaise, or their splendid escalope of veal. The place itself is a bit sterile except for their terrific – and very French – little bar. (2504 McKinney/748-3754/ Tue-Fri, 6-11, Sat till 11:30/Reservations/MC,BA,AE,DC/ $$$).

Pyramid Room. The classiest dining room in Dallas – an aura of affluence and impeccable taste. A paragon of service – absolutely professional but without pomposity, including a theatrical sommelier. A dizzying dinner menu of French specialties of the highest order (lunch is less glamorous) The Grand Mamier dessert souffle is a triumph In sum. Dallas’ finest restaurant But even at that, capable of disappointment because it is so expensive Too expensive. But always a pleasure if you can pay the price. (Fairmont Hotel, Ross & Akard/748-5454/Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30. Dinner: Daily 6-midnight/Reservations/AII credit cards/$$$$)



Italian



Campisi’s. The sign says “Egyptian Restaurant.” but the place is strictly Italian, carried on in the proud family tradition of papa Carlo Campisi. whose portrait still watches over the proceedings Dallas’ original pizza specialists – and still the best. Or try the platefull of sausage and peppers Warm (in fact steamy) and wonderful – and always a waiting line to prove it. (5610 E Mockingbird/ 827-0355IMon-Fri 11a.m. -midnight. Sat till 1 a.m., Sun noon-midnight/No credit cards. Checks accepted/Reservations tor 6 or more/$)

lanni’s. An undistinguished shopping center facade, an entry lobby tacked with Dallas sports photos and celebrity glossies, and a dining room that’s a vineyard of plastic grapes doesn’t bode well But lanni’s can surprise you It’s relaxed and unpretentious – a throwback to simpler dining The waitresses are pros and the kitchen is sound if not stunning And the homemade Italian sausage is as good as any in town. (2230 Greenville/826-6161/Daily 5 30-11 p.m. /Reservations/MC,AE/$$)



D REVISITS

II Sorrento. There had been rumors that II Sorrento was slipping, even an unfavorable review in one of the papers, so we felt duty-bound to check glamorous) The Grand Mamier dessert souffle is a triumph In sum. Dallas’ finest restaurant But even at that, capable of disappointment because it is so expensive Too expensive. But always a pleasure if you can pay the price. (Fairmont Hotel, Ross & Akard/748-5454/Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30. Dinner: Daily 6-midnight/Reservations/AII credit cards/$$$$)



Italian



Campisi’s. The sign says “Egyptian Restaurant.” but the place is strictly Italian, carried on in the proud family tradition of papa Carlo Campisi. whose portrait still watches over the proceedings Dallas’ original pizza specialists – and still the best. Or try the platefull of sausage and peppers Warm (in fact steamy) and wonderful – and always a waiting line to prove it. (5610 E Mockingbird/ 827-0355IMon-Fri 11a.m. -midnight. Sat till 1 a.m., Sun noon-midnight/No credit cards. Checks accepted/Reservations tor 6 or more/$)

lanni’s. An undistinguished shopping center facade, an entry lobby tacked with Dallas sports photos and celebrity glossies, and a dining room that’s a vineyard of plastic grapes doesn’t bode well But lanni’s can surprise you It’s relaxed and unpretentious – a throwback to simpler dining The waitresses are pros and the kitchen is sound if not stunning And the homemade Italian sausage is as good as any in town. (2230 Greenville/826-6161/Daily 5 30-11 p.m. /Reservations/MC,AE/$$)



D REVISITS

II Sorrento. There had been rumors that II Sorrento was slipping, even an unfavorable review in one of the papers, so we felt duty-bound to check it out. More such duties we welcome. It’s a pleasure to report that on our revisits, everything was in order at II Sorrento. The crab fingers in “sauce verde” were sweet, the hot antipasto a nice array of things to nibble on, the veal dishes perfectly prepared, the medallions of beef frascati deliciously seasoned and fork-tender, and the side dish of spaghetti as delightfully al dente as ever. We goofed by ordering the profiterole al cioccolato, simply because this whopper of an ice cream sundae (that’s what it amounts to) was too much, too late in the meal. II Sorrento still manages that elusive blend of friendliness and privacy that gives it a unique personality among Dallas restaurants. And the decor is. as we’ve said before, a kick. The only slight annoyance in our recent evenings was the world’s fastest waiter – not that he rushed the meal, but he appeared and disappeared with a speed that suggested he had bigger tippers to tend. Otherwise. II Sorrento is competently staffed, from strolling musician to head chef. (8676 Turtle Creek, North of NW Hwyl352-8759IDaily 5:30-11, Sat till midnight/ Reservations except on Fri & SatlAII credit cardsl $$$)



Italian Pavilion. An out-of-the-way location and rather garish it out. More such duties we welcome. It’s a pleasure to report that on our revisits, everything was in order at II Sorrento. The crab fingers in “sauce verde” were sweet, the hot antipasto a nice array of things to nibble on, the veal dishes perfectly prepared, the medallions of beef frascati deliciously seasoned and fork-tender, and the side dish of spaghetti as delightfully al dente as ever. We goofed by ordering the profiterole al cioccolato, simply because this whopper of an ice cream sundae (that’s what it amounts to) was too much, too late in the meal. II Sorrento still manages that elusive blend of friendliness and privacy that gives it a unique personality among Dallas restaurants. And the decor is. as we’ve said before, a kick. The only slight annoyance in our recent evenings was the world’s fastest waiter – not that he rushed the meal, but he appeared and disappeared with a speed that suggested he had bigger tippers to tend. Otherwise. II Sorrento is competently staffed, from strolling musician to head chef. (8676 Turtle Creek, North of NW Hwyl352-8759IDaily 5:30-11, Sat till midnight/ Reservations except on Fri & SatlAII credit cardsl $$$)



Italian Pavilion. An out-of-the-way location and rather garish decor are the negatives here. Otherwise, the food is excellent, including the delicious hot antipasto and fine veal dishes, particularly the veal Fiorentina, with crab meat, and the veal Gaetano, with madeira sauce and mushrooms. Soups and salads are less distinguished, and the service, while pleasant, can be slow A good, moderately priced wine list and excellent cappuccino help round out the generally positive picture for Italian Pavilion. (Le Baron Hotel, 1055 Regal Row at Carpenter Fwyl634-8550/Lunch; Mon-Fri 11 30-2, Dinner Mon-Thur 6-11, Fri-Sat 6-11:30, closed Sun/ReservationslAII credit cards/$$$)

Lombardi’s. No gimmicks, just a delightfully remodeled old house where they serve excellent Italian food at reasonable prices The lasagna (the lightest version imaginable) and the saltimbocca are standouts – maybe the best in town. The mamcotti is made with a crepe-like pasta, the pork parmigiana is an unusual delight and the rich green-noodle fettucine is outstanding. A warning on the minestrone. it is thick and flavorful but stew-like – an appetite killer Lunch is usually less impressive than dinner But everyone is eager to please at Lombardi’s; the service is sophisticated and responsive (2815 Mc-Kinney Ave/823-6040/Lunch: Mon-Sat 11-2:30. Dinner Mon-Thur 6-10 30 Fri & Sat till 11/ReservationslMC, V, AEI$$$)

decor are the negatives here. Otherwise, the food is excellent, including the delicious hot antipasto and fine veal dishes, particularly the veal Fiorentina, with crab meat, and the veal Gaetano, with madeira sauce and mushrooms. Soups and salads are less distinguished, and the service, while pleasant, can be slow A good, moderately priced wine list and excellent cappuccino help round out the generally positive picture for Italian Pavilion. (Le Baron Hotel, 1055 Regal Row at Carpenter Fwyl634-8550/Lunch; Mon-Fri 11 30-2, Dinner Mon-Thur 6-11, Fri-Sat 6-11:30, closed Sun/ReservationslAII credit cards/$$$)

Lombardi’s. No gimmicks, just a delightfully remodeled old house where they serve excellent Italian food at reasonable prices The lasagna (the lightest version imaginable) and the saltimbocca are standouts – maybe the best in town. The mamcotti is made with a crepe-like pasta, the pork parmigiana is an unusual delight and the rich green-noodle fettucine is outstanding. A warning on the minestrone. it is thick and flavorful but stew-like – an appetite killer Lunch is usually less impressive than dinner But everyone is eager to please at Lombardi’s; the service is sophisticated and responsive (2815 Mc-Kinney Ave/823-6040/Lunch: Mon-Sat 11-2:30. Dinner Mon-Thur 6-10 30 Fri & Sat till 11/ReservationslMC, V, AEI$$$)

Mario’s. One of few Dallas restaurants to take the sophisticated approach and do so with dignity, with natural elegance. A longstanding tamily success, so there is an air of confidence and pride Delicious roquefort-based cheese spread (complimentary), dense and delicious French bread loaves. marvelous fried zucchini. Try the “Frittura Delizie Romana,” a batter fried spinach appetizer. Entrees (northern Italian specialties) are stylish but not exceptional Splendid wine list (135 Turtle Creek Village/521-1135/Daily 6-11, Sat till midnight/Reservations/AII credit cards/$$$)

Pietro’s.ln a city without neighborhood restaurants. Pietro’s comes closest to what you’d find in, say, the North End of Boston – homestyle Sicilian cooking with scads of loyal patrons The pasta dishes are the besti bets, though Pietro’s veal scallopini a la Siciliano is excellent Have the crème caramel for dessert Friendly, brisk service, though the No reservations” policy means you’ll have to wait It’s usually worth it (5722 Richmond off Greenville/824-9403/ Tue- Thur 5:30-10 p.m., Fri & Sat till 11 p.m./No reservations/ No credit cards/$$)



Oriental



China Inn A competent, dependable Chinese restaurant, crowded even on weekdays. Definitely better at dinner than at lunch. Good appetizers, well-prepared sweet and sour dishes. The standouts are ginger beef, crackling with mildly hot slices of ginger, and war sue har, delicately fried shrimp with a delicious red sauce. Amiable and quick service. (6521 E NW Hwy/361-7733/Lunch: Mon-Fri 11-2 p.m.; Dinner Mon-Thur 5-10:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 5-midnight; Sun 11 a.m. -10:30 p.m./Reservations for 5 or more/MC, V, AE/$$)

Chinese Pavilion. The menu here is identical to that of Hunan, restaurant that spawned this one. Be adventurous and put yourself in the waiters hands. For $8 per person you’ll be treated to a multicourse dinner featuring the chef’s Hunan and Szechuan-style specialties. And Mario’s. One of few Dallas restaurants to take the sophisticated approach and do so with dignity, with natural elegance. A longstanding tamily success, so there is an air of confidence and pride Delicious roquefort-based cheese spread (complimentary), dense and delicious French bread loaves. marvelous fried zucchini. Try the “Frittura Delizie Romana,” a batter fried spinach appetizer. Entrees (northern Italian specialties) are stylish but not exceptional Splendid wine list (135 Turtle Creek Village/521-1135/Daily 6-11, Sat till midnight/Reservations/AII credit cards/$$$)

Pietro’s.ln a city without neighborhood restaurants. Pietro’s comes closest to what you’d find in, say, the North End of Boston – homestyle Sicilian cooking with scads of loyal patrons The pasta dishes are the besti bets, though Pietro’s veal scallopini a la Siciliano is excellent Have the crème caramel for dessert Friendly, brisk service, though the No reservations” policy means you’ll have to wait It’s usually worth it (5722 Richmond off Greenville/824-9403/ Tue- Thur 5:30-10 p.m., Fri & Sat till 11 p.m./No reservations/ No credit cards/$$)



Oriental



China Inn A competent, dependable Chinese restaurant, crowded even on weekdays. Definitely better at dinner than at lunch. Good appetizers, well-prepared sweet and sour dishes. The standouts are ginger beef, crackling with mildly hot slices of ginger, and war sue har, delicately fried shrimp with a delicious red sauce. Amiable and quick service. (6521 E NW Hwy/361-7733/Lunch: Mon-Fri 11-2 p.m.; Dinner Mon-Thur 5-10:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 5-midnight; Sun 11 a.m. -10:30 p.m./Reservations for 5 or more/MC, V, AE/$$)

Chinese Pavilion. The menu here is identical to that of Hunan, restaurant that spawned this one. Be adventurous and put yourself in the waiters hands. For $8 per person you’ll be treated to a multicourse dinner featuring the chef’s Hunan and Szechuan-style specialties. And the crabmeat and corn soup is a must. (European Crossroads. 2829 W Northwest Hwyl357-5777ISun-Thur 11:30 a.m. -11 p.m. Fri & Sat till midnightlReservationslMC, V. AEI$$)

Hunan. Currently Dallas’ best Chinese restaurant. The Hunan cuisine that is its specialty is milder than you’ll find in New York, but still potent Have the ’pu pu tray” of appetizers, and then you’re on your own – i’ts all good (though we recommend Hunan Lamb. Champagne Chicken, and Shrimp with Garlic Sauce) Small and comfortable, but service is sometimes haughty and cold. (5214 Green-ville Ave at Lovers Lnl369-4578IMon- Thur 15:30 a.m.-11 p.m., Fri, Sat & Sun 11-midnightlReservationslMC. V. AEI$$)

Peking Palace. Once Dallas’ Oriental best, but it hasn’t quite kept up with the booming competition Too many items taste warmed-over, but the Szechuan-style selections are, for the most part, excellent (try the shredded pork with garlic sauce). And the Won Ton soup is the best in town And still the most pleasant dining room of any Dallas Oriental restaurant (4119 Lomo AltolS22-1830l Lunch. Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30. Dinner: Mon- Thur 5-11.Fri & Sat till midnight. Sun noon-10 p.m. /Reservations on week-endslMC.BA.AEI$$)

Ports O’Call. The menu now docks in many new ports (wiener schnitzel from Germany, steak au poivre from France, etc ). though the featured fare is still mostly Polynesian. And nothing special at that – but then that’s never been the appeal here anyway. The attractions are the lavish (almost ludicrous) dining rooms, the 37th floor view with the “bia-city ” feeling, and the exotic rum concoctions in the tiki-god-and-blowfish bar – try the Test Pilot, limit 2 per customer (Southland Center, 2117 Live Oakl742-2334ILunch Mon-Sat 11:30-2:30; Dinner. Daily 5:30-10:30/ Reservations/All credit cardsl$$S)

Royal Tokyo. As tar as service and consistency of cuisine the crabmeat and corn soup is a must. (European Crossroads. 2829 W Northwest Hwyl357-5777ISun-Thur 11:30 a.m. -11 p.m. Fri & Sat till midnightlReservationslMC, V. AEI$$)

Hunan. Currently Dallas’ best Chinese restaurant. The Hunan cuisine that is its specialty is milder than you’ll find in New York, but still potent Have the ’pu pu tray” of appetizers, and then you’re on your own – i’ts all good (though we recommend Hunan Lamb. Champagne Chicken, and Shrimp with Garlic Sauce) Small and comfortable, but service is sometimes haughty and cold. (5214 Green-ville Ave at Lovers Lnl369-4578IMon- Thur 15:30 a.m.-11 p.m., Fri, Sat & Sun 11-midnightlReservationslMC. V. AEI$$)

Peking Palace. Once Dallas’ Oriental best, but it hasn’t quite kept up with the booming competition Too many items taste warmed-over, but the Szechuan-style selections are, for the most part, excellent (try the shredded pork with garlic sauce). And the Won Ton soup is the best in town And still the most pleasant dining room of any Dallas Oriental restaurant (4119 Lomo AltolS22-1830l Lunch. Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30. Dinner: Mon- Thur 5-11.Fri & Sat till midnight. Sun noon-10 p.m. /Reservations on week-endslMC.BA.AEI$$)

Ports O’Call. The menu now docks in many new ports (wiener schnitzel from Germany, steak au poivre from France, etc ). though the featured fare is still mostly Polynesian. And nothing special at that – but then that’s never been the appeal here anyway. The attractions are the lavish (almost ludicrous) dining rooms, the 37th floor view with the “bia-city ” feeling, and the exotic rum concoctions in the tiki-god-and-blowfish bar – try the Test Pilot, limit 2 per customer (Southland Center, 2117 Live Oakl742-2334ILunch Mon-Sat 11:30-2:30; Dinner. Daily 5:30-10:30/ Reservations/All credit cardsl$$S)

Royal Tokyo. As tar as service and consistency of cuisine are concerned. Royal Tokyo seems to have risen from its period of decline But it’s not quite the star it once was Perhaps the competition has forced it to Americanize its menu, because the sauces and seasonings are anything but delicate. A pity, because real Japanese cuisine is among the most subtle in the world Still a pleasantly-appointed place. Try the shabu-shabu. a variation on sukiyaki (7525 Greenville Avel368-3304ILunch: Daily 11:30-2. except Sat; Dinner Mon- Thur 5:30-11.Fri & Sat till 1130. Sun 5-10IReservationslMC,BA.AE,DC/$$$)

South China. Quiet and consistent. South China continues to distinguish itself from the ever-increasing hordes of competitors. The combination appetizer plate is perhaps the best in Dallas and the Mandarin specialties that follow usually keep up the pace fine sizzling rice soup, moo shi pork, beet with green onion and ginger, and tantalizing sweet and sour shrimp Black bean sauce is a favorite here – try it over the braised chicken and you’ll see why Their new spinoff restaurant, Chu’s in Addison. shows promise of being even better (5424 E Mocking-birdl826-5420ILunch: Daily 11:30-2:30 Sal & Sun noon-230. Dinner Mon-Thu 5-11. Fri & Sat 5-12, Sun 5-10,/ ReservationslMC,BA,AE/$$)

are concerned. Royal Tokyo seems to have risen from its period of decline But it’s not quite the star it once was Perhaps the competition has forced it to Americanize its menu, because the sauces and seasonings are anything but delicate. A pity, because real Japanese cuisine is among the most subtle in the world Still a pleasantly-appointed place. Try the shabu-shabu. a variation on sukiyaki (7525 Greenville Avel368-3304ILunch: Daily 11:30-2. except Sat; Dinner Mon- Thur 5:30-11.Fri & Sat till 1130. Sun 5-10IReservationslMC,BA.AE,DC/$$$)

South China. Quiet and consistent. South China continues to distinguish itself from the ever-increasing hordes of competitors. The combination appetizer plate is perhaps the best in Dallas and the Mandarin specialties that follow usually keep up the pace fine sizzling rice soup, moo shi pork, beet with green onion and ginger, and tantalizing sweet and sour shrimp Black bean sauce is a favorite here – try it over the braised chicken and you’ll see why Their new spinoff restaurant, Chu’s in Addison. shows promise of being even better (5424 E Mocking-birdl826-5420ILunch: Daily 11:30-2:30 Sal & Sun noon-230. Dinner Mon-Thu 5-11. Fri & Sat 5-12, Sun 5-10,/ ReservationslMC,BA,AE/$$)

D REVISITS

Szechuan. The Lemmon Avenue counterpart to Greenville Avenue’s Hunan restaurant, Szechuan unfortunately has to do battle with the fast-food infestation of its neighbors on the Lemmon strip. Fortunately, it has the weapons to put up a solid fight. If you eat often with the local purveyors of the spicier Chinese cuisines, you’ll recognize the menu – it’s made the rounds. And this kitchen generally does it justice. The menu goes on and on with temptations, but you really needn’t go past the first page of “Chef Specialties ” The Hunan Beef is a classic and always irresistible; after that it’s choose to your own taste because you can hardly miss. Lately we’ve been taken by the River Shang Pork (with a good black bean sauce), the House Lamb (better than the Hunan Lamb), and the House Chicken (as good an Oriental chicken dish as we’ve found anywhere). They’re not perfect, though. On our last visit, the usually fabulous ribs were dry and the usually fine egg rolls were drab: the “Golden Prawn” were described as batter fried but weren’t for some reason (we couldn’t get a clear explanation why). If your appetite is more traditional, try the wonderful hot and sour soup, the bountiful moo shi pork, or their great lo mein. The dining room is on the stark and sterile side, but then you rarely eat Chinese food for the surroundings. If you can find your way past the Arby’s. the McDonald’s, the Kentucky Fried, and the Pizza D REVISITS

Szechuan. The Lemmon Avenue counterpart to Greenville Avenue’s Hunan restaurant, Szechuan unfortunately has to do battle with the fast-food infestation of its neighbors on the Lemmon strip. Fortunately, it has the weapons to put up a solid fight. If you eat often with the local purveyors of the spicier Chinese cuisines, you’ll recognize the menu – it’s made the rounds. And this kitchen generally does it justice. The menu goes on and on with temptations, but you really needn’t go past the first page of “Chef Specialties ” The Hunan Beef is a classic and always irresistible; after that it’s choose to your own taste because you can hardly miss. Lately we’ve been taken by the River Shang Pork (with a good black bean sauce), the House Lamb (better than the Hunan Lamb), and the House Chicken (as good an Oriental chicken dish as we’ve found anywhere). They’re not perfect, though. On our last visit, the usually fabulous ribs were dry and the usually fine egg rolls were drab: the “Golden Prawn” were described as batter fried but weren’t for some reason (we couldn’t get a clear explanation why). If your appetite is more traditional, try the wonderful hot and sour soup, the bountiful moo shi pork, or their great lo mein. The dining room is on the stark and sterile side, but then you rarely eat Chinese food for the surroundings. If you can find your way past the Arby’s. the McDonald’s, the Kentucky Fried, and the Pizza Hut, you’ll be rewarded with this friendly Lem-mon Avenue oasis. Our only major disappointment was that two of our fortune cookies were the same. (4117 Lemmon near Douglas/521-6981 /Daily 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.,Fn&Sat till mid-night/Reservations on weekends/MC, V, AE, DC/



Trader Vic’s. Have fun. but don’t expect anything sublime here – they cover too much ground to have any specialties except the wacky drinks (gardenias floating in rum punch, and so on) The creamed curry dishes are nice, the Indonesian lamb interesting, and the Chinese dishes varied but over-sweet. But while the mood may be fun. the prices are serious. Just have another Samoan Fog Cutter and you may not even notice (Hilton Inn. 5600 N Cen Expwy/827-3620IDaily 5-11:30 p.m., weekends till midnight/Reservations/All credit cardsl$$$)

Mexican



Adelante. An odd little spot in an almost secretive behind-the-shopping-center location But once you find it. you’ll surely find your way back Fantastic and unique Mexican food graced with flair and freshness Thin, greaseHut, you’ll be rewarded with this friendly Lem-mon Avenue oasis. Our only major disappointment was that two of our fortune cookies were the same. (4117 Lemmon near Douglas/521-6981 /Daily 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.,Fn&Sat till mid-night/Reservations on weekends/MC, V, AE, DC/



Trader Vic’s. Have fun. but don’t expect anything sublime here – they cover too much ground to have any specialties except the wacky drinks (gardenias floating in rum punch, and so on) The creamed curry dishes are nice, the Indonesian lamb interesting, and the Chinese dishes varied but over-sweet. But while the mood may be fun. the prices are serious. Just have another Samoan Fog Cutter and you may not even notice (Hilton Inn. 5600 N Cen Expwy/827-3620IDaily 5-11:30 p.m., weekends till midnight/Reservations/All credit cardsl$$$)

Mexican



Adelante. An odd little spot in an almost secretive behind-the-shopping-center location But once you find it. you’ll surely find your way back Fantastic and unique Mexican food graced with flair and freshness Thin, greasetinged tostados made on the spot, nachos buried in fresh relishes, flautas with fabulous guacamole delicate green chile quiche, and an egg and tortilla dish called “Chilaquiles” – both subtle and exotic And don’t pass up the unbelievable praline cheesecake Bar ’by membership.” (5934 Royal Lanel691-8301 IMon-Thur 11 am -9 p.m .,Fri & Sat till 10 p.m., closed Sun/No reservations/ MC, V, AEI$)

Chiquita. One of the most cheerful restaurants in town, and – at least where Mexican food is concerned – one of the best Tex-Mex has never been Chiquita’s forte. but they serve some sensational specialties. like an excel lent tortilla soup and fabulous chicken sour cream enchiladas. In their new location they’ve stopped serving complimentary cups of bean soup, so order some – it may be the best this side of the border Always crowded, but always delightful. (3810 Congress, off Oak Lawn/521-0721IMon-Sat 11:30-11INo reservations/MC, V, AE/$$)

El Taxco. Maybe the best dining value in Dallas Dependable Tex-Mex right down to the retried beans just the way they ought to be – and at very low prices A subtle style with less hot seasonings make it an especially good spot tor newcomers to Mexican food A casual, friendly cafe (2126 N St. Paul/742-0747IWed-Mon 10:30 a.m. -9 p.m, closed TueINo reservationslMCI$)

Hernia Cafe. Home-cooked Tex-Mex from two odd locatians The ludicrous-looking newer version on Lemmon Avenue serves the same great food as the original adobe hole-in-the-wall on Maple But at the Lemmon location, quality is not a certainty Visit Maple tor good old fat flour tortillas hot off the grill, wonderful burritos, great guacamole And the menudo is a community tradition, (3902 Maple/ tinged tostados made on the spot, nachos buried in fresh relishes, flautas with fabulous guacamole delicate green chile quiche, and an egg and tortilla dish called “Chilaquiles” – both subtle and exotic And don’t pass up the unbelievable praline cheesecake Bar ’by membership.” (5934 Royal Lanel691-8301 IMon-Thur 11 am -9 p.m .,Fri & Sat till 10 p.m., closed Sun/No reservations/ MC, V, AEI$)

Chiquita. One of the most cheerful restaurants in town, and – at least where Mexican food is concerned – one of the best Tex-Mex has never been Chiquita’s forte. but they serve some sensational specialties. like an excel lent tortilla soup and fabulous chicken sour cream enchiladas. In their new location they’ve stopped serving complimentary cups of bean soup, so order some – it may be the best this side of the border Always crowded, but always delightful. (3810 Congress, off Oak Lawn/521-0721IMon-Sat 11:30-11INo reservations/MC, V, AE/$$)

El Taxco. Maybe the best dining value in Dallas Dependable Tex-Mex right down to the retried beans just the way they ought to be – and at very low prices A subtle style with less hot seasonings make it an especially good spot tor newcomers to Mexican food A casual, friendly cafe (2126 N St. Paul/742-0747IWed-Mon 10:30 a.m. -9 p.m, closed TueINo reservationslMCI$)

Hernia Cafe. Home-cooked Tex-Mex from two odd locatians The ludicrous-looking newer version on Lemmon Avenue serves the same great food as the original adobe hole-in-the-wall on Maple But at the Lemmon location, quality is not a certainty Visit Maple tor good old fat flour tortillas hot off the grill, wonderful burritos, great guacamole And the menudo is a community tradition, (3902 Maple/ 526-942?’Weekdays 9 a.m.-8 p.m. closed MonINo reser-vationsINo credit cardsI$)

Raphael’s. The ever-present waiting line tells you how good it is But popularity does have its problems – the hustle-bustle can be nerve-wracking and weekends are hopeless. But if you can hit a lull in the action, the warm ranch-house atmosphere is lovely. And the food will likely be at its best. If you must have Tex-Mex. the Raphael’s Plate” is a superb sampling of good stuff. But even better are the specialties. chicken mole, shrimp enchiladas, and chiles rellenos – a dependable favorite. And maybe best of all. the came Tampiqueno or the polio Tampiqueno – they can make the waiting worth it. (3701 McKinney/521-9640/Mon-Fn1130 a.m. -10:30 p.m. Sat noon-10:30, closed Sun/Reservations Mon-Thur only/MC, V, AE/$$)



Greek

Greek Key. A lively and longstanding favorite marked by belly dancing, customer participation, and other revelry. But the kitchen is serious, doing a creditable job of filling the Dallas Greek food void. Dolmas, pastitso, spanakopita, moussaka (or try the combination plate). Forgo the “Grecian shrimp,” but don’t pass up the baklava delicately seasoned with walnuts and honey, finished off by a demi-tasse of heavy Greek coffee. (2903 W Northwest Hwy/358-5177/ Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m., closed SunlAII credit cardslRe-servations/$$)

Goldfinger. More successful as a lively, raucous nightclub than as a restaurant, but Goldfinger does provide some of the city’s best Greek food – a woefully limited aspect of Dallas’ cuisine. So, while you’re clapping and singing with the Greek musicians, try the flaming saganaki, the avgolemeno soup, the shrimp and meat kostas. and the veal venetikia. And the dolmas are a must (2905 Cridelle at W Northwest Hwyl350-6983IMon-Fn 11 am -2 a.m.. 526-942?’Weekdays 9 a.m.-8 p.m. closed MonINo reser-vationsINo credit cardsI$)

Raphael’s. The ever-present waiting line tells you how good it is But popularity does have its problems – the hustle-bustle can be nerve-wracking and weekends are hopeless. But if you can hit a lull in the action, the warm ranch-house atmosphere is lovely. And the food will likely be at its best. If you must have Tex-Mex. the Raphael’s Plate” is a superb sampling of good stuff. But even better are the specialties. chicken mole, shrimp enchiladas, and chiles rellenos – a dependable favorite. And maybe best of all. the came Tampiqueno or the polio Tampiqueno – they can make the waiting worth it. (3701 McKinney/521-9640/Mon-Fn1130 a.m. -10:30 p.m. Sat noon-10:30, closed Sun/Reservations Mon-Thur only/MC, V, AE/$$)



Greek

Greek Key. A lively and longstanding favorite marked by belly dancing, customer participation, and other revelry. But the kitchen is serious, doing a creditable job of filling the Dallas Greek food void. Dolmas, pastitso, spanakopita, moussaka (or try the combination plate). Forgo the “Grecian shrimp,” but don’t pass up the baklava delicately seasoned with walnuts and honey, finished off by a demi-tasse of heavy Greek coffee. (2903 W Northwest Hwy/358-5177/ Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m., closed SunlAII credit cardslRe-servations/$$)

Goldfinger. More successful as a lively, raucous nightclub than as a restaurant, but Goldfinger does provide some of the city’s best Greek food – a woefully limited aspect of Dallas’ cuisine. So, while you’re clapping and singing with the Greek musicians, try the flaming saganaki, the avgolemeno soup, the shrimp and meat kostas. and the veal venetikia. And the dolmas are a must (2905 Cridelle at W Northwest Hwyl350-6983IMon-Fn 11 am -2 a.m.. Sat-Sun 6 p.m.-2 a.m./Reservations/All credit cards/$$$)



Indian



India House. An authentic representation of Indian cuisine The uninitiated may find it all a bit exotic – but a culture shock made pleasant by the helpful guidance of the staff (or try the Shahi House Dinner for a broad sampling) Aficionados of the Indian tradition may find the preparation lacking perfection, but with so much to choose from, danger of disappointment is slight Something is sure to please – or at least to surprise. (5422 E Mockingbird/823-1000/Lunch: Daily 11:30-2:30; Dinner: Sun-Thur 5-10, Fri & sat till 11/Reservations/All Credit cards/$$)



Southern Specialties



D REVISITS

Dixie House. Home cooking Gene Street style. We’ve taken our time about introducing Dixie House to our listings, because some of Street’s other restaurants have impressed us when they were new but didn’t really hold up in the long run, But Dixie House has become something of a regular hang-out for us. particularly for lunch. Like almost all of Street’s restaurants the food is good, the service amiable, and the drinks great. Unlike others, it seems to be fairly consistent, mainly because what it tries to do is serve good Sat-Sun 6 p.m.-2 a.m./Reservations/All credit cards/$$$)



Indian



India House. An authentic representation of Indian cuisine The uninitiated may find it all a bit exotic – but a culture shock made pleasant by the helpful guidance of the staff (or try the Shahi House Dinner for a broad sampling) Aficionados of the Indian tradition may find the preparation lacking perfection, but with so much to choose from, danger of disappointment is slight Something is sure to please – or at least to surprise. (5422 E Mockingbird/823-1000/Lunch: Daily 11:30-2:30; Dinner: Sun-Thur 5-10, Fri & sat till 11/Reservations/All Credit cards/$$)



Southern Specialties



D REVISITS

Dixie House. Home cooking Gene Street style. We’ve taken our time about introducing Dixie House to our listings, because some of Street’s other restaurants have impressed us when they were new but didn’t really hold up in the long run, But Dixie House has become something of a regular hang-out for us. particularly for lunch. Like almost all of Street’s restaurants the food is good, the service amiable, and the drinks great. Unlike others, it seems to be fairly consistent, mainly because what it tries to do is serve good ol’ Southern juicy over-cooked food – lots of calories but lots of pleasant after-dinner warm feelings, too. To our tastes, the meat loaf. the pot roast, and the pork chops are the standouts. The fried chicken is good, but there’s better to be had in town. The catfish is variable, and unfortunately the french fries sometimes taste a mite fishy. Vegetables include very good squash and excellent mashed potatoes, great greasy beer-batter-fried onion rings, but also rather watery green beans But mainly it’s the atmosphere – the built-in style of an old McKinney Avenue building simply reinforced by Street’s collection of church pews, old quilts, bits and pieces from bars and drugstores. The effect isn’t ersatz nostalgia or chi-chi clutter – just comfortable and low-key. (2822 McKinney/823-0071/ Mon- Thur 11-11, Fri & Sat till midnight, Sun noon-11I No ReservationslMC, BA, AEI$$)

ol’ Southern juicy over-cooked food – lots of calories but lots of pleasant after-dinner warm feelings, too. To our tastes, the meat loaf. the pot roast, and the pork chops are the standouts. The fried chicken is good, but there’s better to be had in town. The catfish is variable, and unfortunately the french fries sometimes taste a mite fishy. Vegetables include very good squash and excellent mashed potatoes, great greasy beer-batter-fried onion rings, but also rather watery green beans But mainly it’s the atmosphere – the built-in style of an old McKinney Avenue building simply reinforced by Street’s collection of church pews, old quilts, bits and pieces from bars and drugstores. The effect isn’t ersatz nostalgia or chi-chi clutter – just comfortable and low-key. (2822 McKinney/823-0071/ Mon- Thur 11-11, Fri & Sat till midnight, Sun noon-11I No ReservationslMC, BA, AEI$$)

Celebration. Some of the homestyle pride seems occasionally to be missing from the homestyle cooking since the expansion of this friendly place But still a good spot for wholesome meal at a reasonable price. Pot roast is the best of the five entrees Plus big bowls of good family-style-help-yourself vegetables Beer and wine are available now. but try the apple juice at least once – it’s great (4503 W Lovers Ln/351-5681 /Mon-Sat 5.30-11, Sun till 10:30/No reservations/MC,BA/$)

Red Moon Cafe. Cozy, charming, almost romantic – a purely pleasant little place The menu has Creole overtones gumbo (the real thing), crawfish chicken “Jambalaya.” pork chops Creole ’ But perhaps their most winning dish has nothing to do with New Orleans – fettucine that ranks with the best in town Nice fresh seafood specials – they’ve done some wonderful things with trout Open for breakfast, but nothing special unless coffee is your passion Their chicory version has no peer (4537 Cole/, 526-5391 /Mon-Sat 7-2:30.6-10/No reservations/No credit cards/$)

Sonny Bryan’s. Best barbecue in town? You’ll never get a consensus, but this one gets a lot of votes Juicy, juicy stuff in a funky, funky little smokehouse No tables – you eat on individual school desk tops Beer, no bar (2202 lnwood/357-7120/Mon-Sat 6a.m. -6 30 p.m . Sun 11-2/No reservations/No credit cards/$)



Natural Foods



Health Nut. Dallas’ original full-scale natural foods restaurant – and still a unique institution – is comfortably settled now in its airy and attractive Lovers Lane location, crowned by a lovely sun-terrace room upstairs Good sandwiches, light and imaginative soups, and wonderful salads – a fresh vegetable salad with tahini dressing or. even better, a fresh fruit salad in a delicious lemon-honey dressing A special steamed meal daily (Tuesday is Mexican and Wednesday is Oriental) And. of course, smoothies (4356 W Lovers Lane/692-1411/Mon-Sat 11 a.m. -9 p.m. /No reservations/MC/$)

Celebration. Some of the homestyle pride seems occasionally to be missing from the homestyle cooking since the expansion of this friendly place But still a good spot for wholesome meal at a reasonable price. Pot roast is the best of the five entrees Plus big bowls of good family-style-help-yourself vegetables Beer and wine are available now. but try the apple juice at least once – it’s great (4503 W Lovers Ln/351-5681 /Mon-Sat 5.30-11, Sun till 10:30/No reservations/MC,BA/$)

Red Moon Cafe. Cozy, charming, almost romantic – a purely pleasant little place The menu has Creole overtones gumbo (the real thing), crawfish chicken “Jambalaya.” pork chops Creole ’ But perhaps their most winning dish has nothing to do with New Orleans – fettucine that ranks with the best in town Nice fresh seafood specials – they’ve done some wonderful things with trout Open for breakfast, but nothing special unless coffee is your passion Their chicory version has no peer (4537 Cole/, 526-5391 /Mon-Sat 7-2:30.6-10/No reservations/No credit cards/$)

Sonny Bryan’s. Best barbecue in town? You’ll never get a consensus, but this one gets a lot of votes Juicy, juicy stuff in a funky, funky little smokehouse No tables – you eat on individual school desk tops Beer, no bar (2202 lnwood/357-7120/Mon-Sat 6a.m. -6 30 p.m . Sun 11-2/No reservations/No credit cards/$)



Natural Foods



Health Nut. Dallas’ original full-scale natural foods restaurant – and still a unique institution – is comfortably settled now in its airy and attractive Lovers Lane location, crowned by a lovely sun-terrace room upstairs Good sandwiches, light and imaginative soups, and wonderful salads – a fresh vegetable salad with tahini dressing or. even better, a fresh fruit salad in a delicious lemon-honey dressing A special steamed meal daily (Tuesday is Mexican and Wednesday is Oriental) And. of course, smoothies (4356 W Lovers Lane/692-1411/Mon-Sat 11 a.m. -9 p.m. /No reservations/MC/$)

Delicatessens



Kuby’s. Busy and bustling Excellent homemade sausages (served with hot potato salad or sauerkraut), thick sandwiches (try the pastrami), great pastries, and a soup of the day which is a lunchtime bargain (70¢) A congenial spot with a German accent (6601 Snider Plaza/363-2231/Mon -Sat 8:30-2:30. sandwiches till 5:30/No reservations/MC – $15 minimum/$)

Walls. A worthwhile stop tor displaced New Yorkers and insatiable corned beef fans, though its reputation as the best for kosher-style food in Dallas is earned mainly by default The kosher standards – gefilte fish, herring in sour cream, cheese blintzes – are very tasty, but the Delicatessens



Kuby’s. Busy and bustling Excellent homemade sausages (served with hot potato salad or sauerkraut), thick sandwiches (try the pastrami), great pastries, and a soup of the day which is a lunchtime bargain (70¢) A congenial spot with a German accent (6601 Snider Plaza/363-2231/Mon -Sat 8:30-2:30. sandwiches till 5:30/No reservations/MC – $15 minimum/$)

Walls. A worthwhile stop tor displaced New Yorkers and insatiable corned beef fans, though its reputation as the best for kosher-style food in Dallas is earned mainly by default The kosher standards – gefilte fish, herring in sour cream, cheese blintzes – are very tasty, but the quality of food and service is uneven. Except for the disappointing chopped liver, sandwiches are the best bet. And try the outstanding cabbage soup (10749 Preston Rd/691-4444/Daily 7:30 a.m. -7:30 p.m. INo reservations/ MC, Vl$$)

quality of food and service is uneven. Except for the disappointing chopped liver, sandwiches are the best bet. And try the outstanding cabbage soup (10749 Preston Rd/691-4444/Daily 7:30 a.m. -7:30 p.m. INo reservations/ MC, Vl$$)

D REVISITS



Black Forest. Aside from the Swiss cheese soup, which we heartily recommend, the food at the Black Forest seems to be slipping. At this long-time lunch favorite renowned for its pastries, we encountered a series of disappointments on several recent visits. First, the bread on the sandwiches was hard and – dare one suggest in a bakery? – stale. Then, the split pea soup on another visit had a decided kerosene taste, don’t ask us why. Next, the Napoleons, which looked gorgeous, turned out to be not quite new. and an almond torte, which we bought and took home, though a work of art in appearance, just didn’t taste good. It was pasty and sweet, with no almond flavor, though it was beautifully trimmed with un-crunchy nuts. Even the service was mixed – satisfactory on a couple of midweek visits, officious and put-upon on a busy Saturday afternoon A once-charming little place which did well enough to open in two other locations, the restaurant has lost much of its credibility in our eyes. In spite of the excellent coffee and one marvelous soup, it is no longer a place we would urge our friends to try Too bad. (5879 Blackwell off Northwest Hwy/368-4490/Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat till 5 p.m./no reservations/V/$)

D REVISITS



Black Forest. Aside from the Swiss cheese soup, which we heartily recommend, the food at the Black Forest seems to be slipping. At this long-time lunch favorite renowned for its pastries, we encountered a series of disappointments on several recent visits. First, the bread on the sandwiches was hard and – dare one suggest in a bakery? – stale. Then, the split pea soup on another visit had a decided kerosene taste, don’t ask us why. Next, the Napoleons, which looked gorgeous, turned out to be not quite new. and an almond torte, which we bought and took home, though a work of art in appearance, just didn’t taste good. It was pasty and sweet, with no almond flavor, though it was beautifully trimmed with un-crunchy nuts. Even the service was mixed – satisfactory on a couple of midweek visits, officious and put-upon on a busy Saturday afternoon A once-charming little place which did well enough to open in two other locations, the restaurant has lost much of its credibility in our eyes. In spite of the excellent coffee and one marvelous soup, it is no longer a place we would urge our friends to try Too bad. (5879 Blackwell off Northwest Hwy/368-4490/Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat till 5 p.m./no reservations/V/$)

Seafood



S & D Oyster Company. Excellent oysters and shrimp and a few broiled fish – usually snapper or trout – when they’re available. They wisely avoid the fancier stuff – crab or lobster or clams – that has to be shipped in frozen. Simplicity of preparation is the key to this restaurant’s well-deserved success. For lunch, the oyster loaf – fried oysters on a French roll with tartar sauce – is a good choice. For dinner, have some boiled shrimp for starters and finish off with their home-made pie. A bit noisy, but the place is for eaters as opposed to diners. Beer and wine only. (2701 McKinney near Routh/823-6350IMon-Thur 11 a.m.-10 p.m.. Fri & Sat till 11. closed Sun/No reservations/MC/$$)



Steaks, Burgers, Etc.



Chili’s. A handsome burger joint Good chili, unusual soft tacos of flour tortillas, and. best of all, long, thin, greasy french fries with the skin still on them Always hopping – you’ll likely wait in line (7567 Greenville Ave at Meadow Rd/361 -4371 /Daily 11 a.m. -midnight, Fri & Sat till 2 a.m./ No reservations/MC, V. AEI$)

Houlihan’s. With a menu ranging from a hot dog to roast Seafood



S & D Oyster Company. Excellent oysters and shrimp and a few broiled fish – usually snapper or trout – when they’re available. They wisely avoid the fancier stuff – crab or lobster or clams – that has to be shipped in frozen. Simplicity of preparation is the key to this restaurant’s well-deserved success. For lunch, the oyster loaf – fried oysters on a French roll with tartar sauce – is a good choice. For dinner, have some boiled shrimp for starters and finish off with their home-made pie. A bit noisy, but the place is for eaters as opposed to diners. Beer and wine only. (2701 McKinney near Routh/823-6350IMon-Thur 11 a.m.-10 p.m.. Fri & Sat till 11. closed Sun/No reservations/MC/$$)



Steaks, Burgers, Etc.



Chili’s. A handsome burger joint Good chili, unusual soft tacos of flour tortillas, and. best of all, long, thin, greasy french fries with the skin still on them Always hopping – you’ll likely wait in line (7567 Greenville Ave at Meadow Rd/361 -4371 /Daily 11 a.m. -midnight, Fri & Sat till 2 a.m./ No reservations/MC, V. AEI$)

Houlihan’s. With a menu ranging from a hot dog to roast duck and touching on most everything in between, there are no great expectations Which is why Houlihan’s is usually a pleasant surprise for the good – despite the scope, there are lots of hits and tew misses Very good omelettes, burgers, quiche, nice salads, and several more ambitious options (stuffed shrimp, baked trout, etc ) A host of rich and gooey desserts and cappuccino – a good spot for midnignt munchies (4 NorthPark East/ 36l-9426IDaily 11 a.m. -1:30 a.m.INo reservations/MC. V, AE. DC/$$)

lohabod’s. Slick in the Greenville Avenue tradition, but Ichabod’s is nevertheless a very pleasant and dependable place The key to their success is a limited menu of steaks and seafood with nothing so elaborate that the kitchen staff can’t handle it. There are a few nicely imaginative touches, like a “relish tray” of raw fresh vegetables instead of a tired salad A nice dining area with its own entrance to separate it from the teeming swingles bar. (Old Town. 5500 Greenville/691 -2646/Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30; Dinner daily 6-11/No reservations/All credit cards/$$)

Kirby’s. Simply astonishing steaks at prices that will please if not astonish you Kirby’s is the only place to think of if all you want is a steak. It has some other things going for it. great baked potatoes, a battery of motherly waitresses, and a Fifties-style decor that’s funky without trying to be. But the main thing here is the beet. (3715 Greenville/823-7296ITue-Sun 5:30-10:30. Fri & Sat till midnightlReser-vations/AII credit cards/$$)

Stoneleigh P. An Oak Lawn favorite and eclectic hangout. A restoration of what was long a pharmacy – clever but not cutesy. Provolone cheeseburgers on pumpernickel are duck and touching on most everything in between, there are no great expectations Which is why Houlihan’s is usually a pleasant surprise for the good – despite the scope, there are lots of hits and tew misses Very good omelettes, burgers, quiche, nice salads, and several more ambitious options (stuffed shrimp, baked trout, etc ) A host of rich and gooey desserts and cappuccino – a good spot for midnignt munchies (4 NorthPark East/ 36l-9426IDaily 11 a.m. -1:30 a.m.INo reservations/MC. V, AE. DC/$$)

lohabod’s. Slick in the Greenville Avenue tradition, but Ichabod’s is nevertheless a very pleasant and dependable place The key to their success is a limited menu of steaks and seafood with nothing so elaborate that the kitchen staff can’t handle it. There are a few nicely imaginative touches, like a “relish tray” of raw fresh vegetables instead of a tired salad A nice dining area with its own entrance to separate it from the teeming swingles bar. (Old Town. 5500 Greenville/691 -2646/Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:30-2:30; Dinner daily 6-11/No reservations/All credit cards/$$)

Kirby’s. Simply astonishing steaks at prices that will please if not astonish you Kirby’s is the only place to think of if all you want is a steak. It has some other things going for it. great baked potatoes, a battery of motherly waitresses, and a Fifties-style decor that’s funky without trying to be. But the main thing here is the beet. (3715 Greenville/823-7296ITue-Sun 5:30-10:30. Fri & Sat till midnightlReser-vations/AII credit cards/$$)

Stoneleigh P. An Oak Lawn favorite and eclectic hangout. A restoration of what was long a pharmacy – clever but not cutesy. Provolone cheeseburgers on pumpernickel are the favorite among many goodies Great magazine rack (browsing encouraged) and fabulous |uke box (from Bach to Stones). (2926 Maple/741-0824/Mon-Thur 11:15-mid-night, Fri & Sat till 1:30 a.m., Sun 12-12, bar daily till 1 a.m., Fri & Sat till 2/No reservations/No credit cards/$)

Strictly Ta-Bu. A terrific old neighborhood bar with a mixed bag clientele The original 1948 decor has been virtually untouched and charms with its classy-tacky effect Great homemade soups and sometimes great pizza – the kitchen is rather erratic lately Also burgers, steaks, sandwiches. Live jazz most nights and an occasional free flick (4111 Lomo Alto/526-9325/Mon-Fri 5 p.m -2 a.m., Sat 6 p.m.-1 a m/No reservations/MC, V/$$)

T.G.I. Friday’s. This may be Dallas’ junk food paradise – if |unk food means luscious hamburgers (still among the best in town), a munchy concoction called “nacholupas,’ the biggest chefs salad you’ll ever see, and even rhubarb pie. Good steak bargains, avoid the omelettes. The place is lively as ever, with lots of swingles and a little of everything else. (Old Town, 5500 Greenville/363-S353/Daily 11:30 a.m. -2 a.m. /No reservations/MC, V, AE/$$)



Mainly For Lunch



The Bronx. A warm and funky little place with tew pretensions and some terrific food coming from its kitchen. Nothing fancy, just great omelettes (served with a side of Italian sausage and a toasted bagel), sausage sandwiches, mushroom meatloaf. and a hot pastrami on toasted rye the favorite among many goodies Great magazine rack (browsing encouraged) and fabulous |uke box (from Bach to Stones). (2926 Maple/741-0824/Mon-Thur 11:15-mid-night, Fri & Sat till 1:30 a.m., Sun 12-12, bar daily till 1 a.m., Fri & Sat till 2/No reservations/No credit cards/$)

Strictly Ta-Bu. A terrific old neighborhood bar with a mixed bag clientele The original 1948 decor has been virtually untouched and charms with its classy-tacky effect Great homemade soups and sometimes great pizza – the kitchen is rather erratic lately Also burgers, steaks, sandwiches. Live jazz most nights and an occasional free flick (4111 Lomo Alto/526-9325/Mon-Fri 5 p.m -2 a.m., Sat 6 p.m.-1 a m/No reservations/MC, V/$$)

T.G.I. Friday’s. This may be Dallas’ junk food paradise – if |unk food means luscious hamburgers (still among the best in town), a munchy concoction called “nacholupas,’ the biggest chefs salad you’ll ever see, and even rhubarb pie. Good steak bargains, avoid the omelettes. The place is lively as ever, with lots of swingles and a little of everything else. (Old Town, 5500 Greenville/363-S353/Daily 11:30 a.m. -2 a.m. /No reservations/MC, V, AE/$$)



Mainly For Lunch



The Bronx. A warm and funky little place with tew pretensions and some terrific food coming from its kitchen. Nothing fancy, just great omelettes (served with a side of Italian sausage and a toasted bagel), sausage sandwiches, mushroom meatloaf. and a hot pastrami on toasted rye that ranks with the best By all means have dessert: homemade pies and cheesecake and a chocolate mousse that will bring you to your knees Lunch seems to be in general a better bet than dinner Beer and wine only, but a great selection of that, and a friendly, casual atmosphere (3835 Cedar Springs near Oak Lawn/521-58211 Daily 11:30 a.m.-12:30 a.m., bar till 2INo reservations/ MCI$$)

Ciro’s. Great Sicilian-style pizza and an attractive array of elaborate sandwiches in an airy, old-time corner store at McKinney and Hall The “wine bar” serves fine wines by the glass, the beers include some nice imports, and there’s a great hard apple cider with a real kick (3237 McKinney at Hall/745-9464IMon-Wed 11:30 a.m-3 p.m , Thur & Fri till midnight. Sat till 1 a.m. closed Sun/No reservationslMCI$$)

Gallery Buffet. An expertly catered outlet table at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, featuring hearty soups, salads, homemade breads, and desserts for only $3 Wine extra. (DMFA. Fair Park/421 -41B7ITue-Fri 11:30 a.m-1:30 p.m /No reservations/No credit cards/$)

Magic Pan. A very popular place with a delicious selection of crepes, including outstanding dessert crepes Very crowded during the week, but nice for Sunday brunch or late night after-theater snacks (NorthPark – New Mall/ 692-7574/Mon-Thur 11a.m. -midnight. Fri till 1 a.m., Sat 10 a.m. -1a.m.. Sun 10 a.m. -midnight/No reservations/ MC. V. AE.DCI$$)



D REVISITS

| The Zodiac Room. This restaurant is a local institution, still associated by many with Helen Corbitt. But Ms Corbitt is no longer there and though many of her innovations and ideas perthat ranks with the best By all means have dessert: homemade pies and cheesecake and a chocolate mousse that will bring you to your knees Lunch seems to be in general a better bet than dinner Beer and wine only, but a great selection of that, and a friendly, casual atmosphere (3835 Cedar Springs near Oak Lawn/521-58211 Daily 11:30 a.m.-12:30 a.m., bar till 2INo reservations/ MCI$$)

Ciro’s. Great Sicilian-style pizza and an attractive array of elaborate sandwiches in an airy, old-time corner store at McKinney and Hall The “wine bar” serves fine wines by the glass, the beers include some nice imports, and there’s a great hard apple cider with a real kick (3237 McKinney at Hall/745-9464IMon-Wed 11:30 a.m-3 p.m , Thur & Fri till midnight. Sat till 1 a.m. closed Sun/No reservationslMCI$$)

Gallery Buffet. An expertly catered outlet table at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, featuring hearty soups, salads, homemade breads, and desserts for only $3 Wine extra. (DMFA. Fair Park/421 -41B7ITue-Fri 11:30 a.m-1:30 p.m /No reservations/No credit cards/$)

Magic Pan. A very popular place with a delicious selection of crepes, including outstanding dessert crepes Very crowded during the week, but nice for Sunday brunch or late night after-theater snacks (NorthPark – New Mall/ 692-7574/Mon-Thur 11a.m. -midnight. Fri till 1 a.m., Sat 10 a.m. -1a.m.. Sun 10 a.m. -midnight/No reservations/ MC. V. AE.DCI$$)



D REVISITS

| The Zodiac Room. This restaurant is a local institution, still associated by many with Helen Corbitt. But Ms Corbitt is no longer there and though many of her innovations and ideas persist. there is a subtle but unmistakable decline in quality, though dozens of loyal customers pack the place on Saturday noon and for the Thursday night buffet. We tried both, and sadly must report that things are not what they were or could be On the whole, lunch was better than the evening buffet The food was interesting as lunch fare, though not uniformly well-prepared The meal began with truly wonderful hot popovers and butter, and tiny cups of delicious cream of spinach soup The sea and garden salad, a melange of jumbo shrimp, avocado slices, fresh lettuce and remoulade sauce, was tasty, as were the cheese straws that accompanied it But the Duke of Windsor sandwich – turkey. Cheddar cheese and chutney on toasted bread – was very dry The mile-high strawberry ice-cream pie was memorable only for its impossibly generous size However, the vanilla ice cream ball rolled in toasted pecans and served with hot fudge or butterscotch sauce is as good as it is wicked, and the fudge sauce itself is phenomenal. No single dish deserved acclaim from the Thursday buffet the evening we visited – the menu changes from week to week. Once again, popovers came with drinks, but now they were burned. We had overdone roast beef and Spanish sist. there is a subtle but unmistakable decline in quality, though dozens of loyal customers pack the place on Saturday noon and for the Thursday night buffet. We tried both, and sadly must report that things are not what they were or could be On the whole, lunch was better than the evening buffet The food was interesting as lunch fare, though not uniformly well-prepared The meal began with truly wonderful hot popovers and butter, and tiny cups of delicious cream of spinach soup The sea and garden salad, a melange of jumbo shrimp, avocado slices, fresh lettuce and remoulade sauce, was tasty, as were the cheese straws that accompanied it But the Duke of Windsor sandwich – turkey. Cheddar cheese and chutney on toasted bread – was very dry The mile-high strawberry ice-cream pie was memorable only for its impossibly generous size However, the vanilla ice cream ball rolled in toasted pecans and served with hot fudge or butterscotch sauce is as good as it is wicked, and the fudge sauce itself is phenomenal. No single dish deserved acclaim from the Thursday buffet the evening we visited – the menu changes from week to week. Once again, popovers came with drinks, but now they were burned. We had overdone roast beef and Spanish chicken – neither top entree material as they were prepared – though the stuffed fish rolls were better The once-renowned salads were equally un-distinguished – cold broccoli in a white gelatin was absolutely tasteless, a red (strawberry? cranberry? raspberry?) molded salad was sweet but nondescript, a limp tossed salad had squishy croutons. The vegetables too were somehow done wrong The green beans were large dice, not French cut as they should have been for the almonds cooked with them, and they were so al dente they were hardly warm The best vegetable was a carrot dish that looked and tasted like pumpkin pie And there were some cherried grapes that didn’t really seem to belong anywhere – certainly not with the roast they accompanied Of the five or six desserts – a variety of cakes, a French apple pie. dry brownies – only one. the coffee Haagen-Dazs ice cream, really appealed. (Neiman-Marcus downtown/741-6911/Mon-Sat 10.30 a.m. -2 30 p.m., teatime daily 3-5 p.m. except Thur 2:30-3:30. Thur dinner 5-7 p.m. /Reservations/Neiman Marcus charge card only, checks acceptedl$$)

chicken – neither top entree material as they were prepared – though the stuffed fish rolls were better The once-renowned salads were equally un-distinguished – cold broccoli in a white gelatin was absolutely tasteless, a red (strawberry? cranberry? raspberry?) molded salad was sweet but nondescript, a limp tossed salad had squishy croutons. The vegetables too were somehow done wrong The green beans were large dice, not French cut as they should have been for the almonds cooked with them, and they were so al dente they were hardly warm The best vegetable was a carrot dish that looked and tasted like pumpkin pie And there were some cherried grapes that didn’t really seem to belong anywhere – certainly not with the roast they accompanied Of the five or six desserts – a variety of cakes, a French apple pie. dry brownies – only one. the coffee Haagen-Dazs ice cream, really appealed. (Neiman-Marcus downtown/741-6911/Mon-Sat 10.30 a.m. -2 30 p.m., teatime daily 3-5 p.m. except Thur 2:30-3:30. Thur dinner 5-7 p.m. /Reservations/Neiman Marcus charge card only, checks acceptedl$$)

Fort Worth Restaurants



Angelo’s. A name that’s known across the state as one of Texas premiere barbecue pits And it is Great beet, rich spicy sauce, big sandwiches, cold draught, and a setting that tits – West Texas rustic and sawdust floors And overlooking the proceedings is a monstrous stuttad bear – a landmark himsell (2533 White Settlement Rd/(817) 332-0357IMon-Sat 11-10INo reservations/No credit cards $)

The Balcony. Perched in the second story of a shopping center, the Balcony serves well-prepared but not extraordinary food. Standouts are the onion soup, a red snapper prepared with crab, lobster, and a subtle mushroom sauce, and a pleasant veal dish served with Wisconsin cheese. (6100 Camp Bowie Blvdl(817) 731-3719/ Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30-2; Dinner: Mon-fri & Sat 10:30, closed SunlReservationslMC, V. AEI$$)

Carriage House. One of the oldest names in Fort Worth dining, the Carriage House is not the wonder it once was. but it, still has its moments It’s meal of ups and downs fine Old-plantation-style service but in a crab setting. excellent appetizers (have their splendid smoked salmon) but miserable soups; a fine Chateaubriand (beef dishes are their specialty) but served with canned peas and carrots (5236 Camp Bowie /817)732-2873ILunch: Sun-Fri 11-2. Dinner Daily 6-11/Reservations IMC, V,AEI$$$)

Cattleman’s. A famous Texas name that still delivers, and still from its original location right in the heart of the stockyards The steaks are the thing here and they’re terrific – you can watch them being cooked on the grills at the end of each dining room Lots of other options, ranging from calf fries (Mountain Oysters ) to lobster and spaghetti (2458 N Mainll817)624-3945IMon-Fri 11 a m -10:45 p.m., Sat 4-10 45 p.m , closed SunlReserva-tionslAII credit cards/$$)



D REVISITS

Le Bistro. The look, the feel of a small, family-owned restaurant in Paris, except that it’s in Fort Worth. A stone’ s throw from the Kimbell. Le Bistro Fort Worth Restaurants



Angelo’s. A name that’s known across the state as one of Texas premiere barbecue pits And it is Great beet, rich spicy sauce, big sandwiches, cold draught, and a setting that tits – West Texas rustic and sawdust floors And overlooking the proceedings is a monstrous stuttad bear – a landmark himsell (2533 White Settlement Rd/(817) 332-0357IMon-Sat 11-10INo reservations/No credit cards $)

The Balcony. Perched in the second story of a shopping center, the Balcony serves well-prepared but not extraordinary food. Standouts are the onion soup, a red snapper prepared with crab, lobster, and a subtle mushroom sauce, and a pleasant veal dish served with Wisconsin cheese. (6100 Camp Bowie Blvdl(817) 731-3719/ Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30-2; Dinner: Mon-fri & Sat 10:30, closed SunlReservationslMC, V. AEI$$)

Carriage House. One of the oldest names in Fort Worth dining, the Carriage House is not the wonder it once was. but it, still has its moments It’s meal of ups and downs fine Old-plantation-style service but in a crab setting. excellent appetizers (have their splendid smoked salmon) but miserable soups; a fine Chateaubriand (beef dishes are their specialty) but served with canned peas and carrots (5236 Camp Bowie /817)732-2873ILunch: Sun-Fri 11-2. Dinner Daily 6-11/Reservations IMC, V,AEI$$$)

Cattleman’s. A famous Texas name that still delivers, and still from its original location right in the heart of the stockyards The steaks are the thing here and they’re terrific – you can watch them being cooked on the grills at the end of each dining room Lots of other options, ranging from calf fries (Mountain Oysters ) to lobster and spaghetti (2458 N Mainll817)624-3945IMon-Fri 11 a m -10:45 p.m., Sat 4-10 45 p.m , closed SunlReserva-tionslAII credit cards/$$)



D REVISITS

Le Bistro. The look, the feel of a small, family-owned restaurant in Paris, except that it’s in Fort Worth. A stone’ s throw from the Kimbell. Le Bistro artfully manages to look spruce in a rather dismal building. Most of one wall holds an impressive (and well-stocked) wine rack, another is covered with dozens of miniature Impressionist prints, A subtle Gallic touch is evident in everything from the menu – in good French – to the muted red, white and blue color scheme that picks up red candles, tablecloths and cushioned chairs. But in the kitchen where it counts, Le Bistro has had some slippage since our last report. The offerings still range ambitiously wide, from veal marsala to frog’s legs Provencale. but an element of routine, if not plain complacency, seems to have set in. A potential winner, shrimp in sherry, didn’t harmonize; while the sauce wasn’t overly rich, it somehow masked rather than enhanced the taste of the shrimp. We went with the waitress’ recommendation at dinner, tournedos: two filets, one with béamaise, the other with mushroom sauce. The beef was superb, but here again the sauces seemed a distraction: both were bland. Elsewhere on the menu things worked out unevenly, A good assorted hors d’oeuvres was a meal in itself, but the snails bourguignon were rubbery. Cold cream of spinach soup was vile: thin, undersalted, more spinach than cream, and no attempt to season it at the table made it edible. The French onion soup was, on the other hand, an authentic treat, seasoned just right, vivid and good. All in all, however, the French on the menu was better than the French in the food. (3322 Camp Bowiel(817) 332-5102/Brunch: Tue-Fri 11:30-2, Dinner: Tue-Sat 5:30-9:30/ Reservations/MC, V/$$$)



Old Swiss House. Many claim that this is Fort Worth’s finestCertainly a Fort Worth favorite – the Kaufmann tamilyhas been serving fine continental cuisine here for manyyears Delightful veal dishes (the St. Moritz is rich andsatisfying) and a daily fresh seafood special Great littlecomplimentary cheese rolls and a lovely Boston lettucedinner salad Not a particularly distinctive place, morecomfortable then classy And the service can seem hurried. (5412 Camp Bowiel(817)738-8091IMon- Thur 6-10,Fri & Sat till 10:30. closed SunlReservationslMC, V, AE,DC/$$$)

artfully manages to look spruce in a rather dismal building. Most of one wall holds an impressive (and well-stocked) wine rack, another is covered with dozens of miniature Impressionist prints, A subtle Gallic touch is evident in everything from the menu – in good French – to the muted red, white and blue color scheme that picks up red candles, tablecloths and cushioned chairs. But in the kitchen where it counts, Le Bistro has had some slippage since our last report. The offerings still range ambitiously wide, from veal marsala to frog’s legs Provencale. but an element of routine, if not plain complacency, seems to have set in. A potential winner, shrimp in sherry, didn’t harmonize; while the sauce wasn’t overly rich, it somehow masked rather than enhanced the taste of the shrimp. We went with the waitress’ recommendation at dinner, tournedos: two filets, one with béamaise, the other with mushroom sauce. The beef was superb, but here again the sauces seemed a distraction: both were bland. Elsewhere on the menu things worked out unevenly, A good assorted hors d’oeuvres was a meal in itself, but the snails bourguignon were rubbery. Cold cream of spinach soup was vile: thin, undersalted, more spinach than cream, and no attempt to season it at the table made it edible. The French onion soup was, on the other hand, an authentic treat, seasoned just right, vivid and good. All in all, however, the French on the menu was better than the French in the food. (3322 Camp Bowiel(817) 332-5102/Brunch: Tue-Fri 11:30-2, Dinner: Tue-Sat 5:30-9:30/ Reservations/MC, V/$$$)



Old Swiss House. Many claim that this is Fort Worth’s finestCertainly a Fort Worth favorite – the Kaufmann tamilyhas been serving fine continental cuisine here for manyyears Delightful veal dishes (the St. Moritz is rich andsatisfying) and a daily fresh seafood special Great littlecomplimentary cheese rolls and a lovely Boston lettucedinner salad Not a particularly distinctive place, morecomfortable then classy And the service can seem hurried. (5412 Camp Bowiel(817)738-8091IMon- Thur 6-10,Fri & Sat till 10:30. closed SunlReservationslMC, V, AE,DC/$$$)

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