Sponsored: Exercising in the Morning vs. Evening

An evening run can feel easier than the same run done in the morning.

Your friend faithfully exercises in the morning, but you always hit snooze. Don’t worry — you can still get a good, maybe even better, workout that evening. The time of day you choose to exercise doesn’t really matter. Morning and evening exercise both have advantages and disadvantages. What does matter is that you make an effort to be physically active.

Performance

If you want to give it your all, choose a mid-afternoon or evening session. Higher body temperatures and more supple muscles facilitate improved performance. Your perception of intensity is also different in the evening. A speed or effort that feels very hard in the morning may be feel much easier in the evening. Lung function is also better in the mid-afternoon to evening, reported a study presented at the 70th annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians.

Adherence

People who exercise in the morning may workout more consistently. Putting off your workout until the evening means that social, work or family obligations could arise and derail your intentions. A day’s worth of work and stress can also ruin your motivation.

Warm-up

Because your body temperatures are lower in the morning, you need to spend more time warming up. A morning warm-up may need to last as long as 15 minutes. If you have limited time, this could cut into the intense portion of your session. In the evening your connective tissues and muscles are already warm, so you can jump into the meat of your workout within five to seven minutes of warming up.

Strength and Sleep

Muscle-building and power exercises, such as plyometrics or racquetball, may provide you with the most results in the evening. Your muscles are fully loaded with optimal nutrition to utilize during anaerobic, heavy lifts. Working out too close to bedtime can interfere with precious hours of sleep, though. Sleep helps facilitate muscle repair and recovery, so try to get your workout done at least three hours before hitting your pillow, the National Sleep Institute recommends.

References & Resources

Newsletter

Keep me up to date on the latest happenings and all that D Magazine has to offer.

Find It

Search our directories for...

Doctors

Doctors

Dentists

Dentists

Hospitals and Clinics

Hospitals and Clinics

Gyms & Studios

Gyms & Studios

View All

View All

Comments