Bill Minutaglio’s Kennedy Assassination Book Is Not To Be Confused With Stephen King’s

As the 50th anniversary of the assassination nears, Stephen King was first out of the gate, with his 11/22/63. Now comes news that former Morning News scribe Bill Minutaglio and his buddy Steven L. Davis will be coming out with a book about the worst day in Dallas. Here’s how the press release describes the nonfiction book:

Dallas 1963 follows the city through three turbulent years, beginning with the Kennedy election in November 1960 and ending on November 22, 1963. Set against the backdrop of a nation in transition, Minutaglio and Davis explain what the President and his team were thinking and doing in those three years, and why they could never have really understood the swirling forces awaiting them in Texas, where a rich and surprising ensemble of characters defined the city many people would blame for killing the President: rabid politicos, gangsters, unsung civil rights leaders, strippers, billionaires, defrocked military generals, fundamentalist preachers, clandestine heroes, and marauding police, among them.

The book will be published by Twelve in 2013, to coincide with the assassination’s anniversary. North American rights were sold in a heated three-day auction by Dallas power literary agent David Hale Smith, who used to run his own DHS Literary but then sold out to the Man and now works for an enormous, soulless, New York-based publishing behemoth called InkWell Management. David used to be a friend of mine. I asked him to confirm for me that the book had sold for $650,000 and a reservation for four at momofuku. He just put his stockinged feet up on his desk, threw his head back, and laughed like Max Cady through the smoke from a fine Cuban cigar.

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Comments

  • That sounds like him.

  • Historicus

    Wow, a book about collective guilt for the sins of one disaffected loner! Can’t wait to see how a city known for conservative politics can be blamed for the actions of a left-wing admirer of Fidel Castro, and read about those marauding cops who risked their lives that day scrambling all over the Grassy Knoll and running up the stairs of the TSBD building. One of those marauding cops lost his life trying to question the main suspect who was AWOL from his workplace right after the shooting. Lee Harvey Oswald was born in New Orleans, lived in Ft Worth, New York, NO, and Dallas. The most negative experience in his youth was NYC. He did a stint in the Marine Corp where he earned the nickname “Oswaldovitch” for his infatuation with the Soviet Union. So I hope the collective guilt scenario includes all of these influences in his life. I can hardly wait to see if this concept makes any sense at all or if it’s just a collection of shallow stereotypes