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Wine

What to Drink Now: Easter Whites

Wines that signal that it's time for spring.

Easter weekend has arrived, meaning that spring is in full bloom, white shoes are allowed to be worn, and white wine should be poured at every gathering. Here are a few to toast the start of the season. (Some were sent for editorial consideration.)

Ripe Sauvignon Blanc

Spring sings with Sauvignon Blanc, produced across the globe from Loire or Bordeaux, Alto Adige to Casablanca, Napa Valley to Marlborough. David Ramey’s Sidebar Richie Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc ($33 at Spec’s) showcases this historic vineyard, highlighting the intense minerality of the Sonoma soils, for a bold wine with character not often found in Sauvignon Blanc. Trinchero Napa Valley Mary’s Sauvignon Blanc ($35 via wine.com) layers honeydew, tropical pineapple, and guava. Sonoma’s Dutton Estate Kylie’s Cuvee Sauvignon Blanc ($25 via wine.com) shines with notes of jasmine, passion fruit, and lemongrass.

Ritual Sauvignon Blanc ($20 at Spec’s) from Chile’s Casablanca region, not far from the Pacific, reveals an aromatic wine filled with soft herbs, white peach, and lemon peel with texture thanks to the careful integration of wine fermented in neutral oak, stainless steel, and concrete eggs. Napa’s Galerie Naissance Sauvignon Blanc ($30 via the website) reveals rich depth thanks to similar winemaking techniques, creating a layered, luscious wine with balanced notes of pear, pineapple and herbal grassiness with a creamy, inviting finish. Highly approachable, and easy to find, McBride Sisters Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc ($15 at Kroger) highlights the grapefruit citrus often expected with New Zealand selections, without overpowering the palate, creating a nicely rounded selection.

Arietta “On The White Keys” Napa Valley White ($65 at Pogo’s) melds a touch of Semillon with Sauvignon Blanc for a Bordeaux style white. Intriguing and refined, the wine shines with orange peel, ripe fig, and blanched almonds. Amavi Semillon ($24 via their website) from Walla Walla is a weighty, textured wine that’s ideal for heartier poultry or pork pairings, showcasing smoky Flintstone, honey, and golden apple.

Crisp, lively Vermentino is a light white wine with complexity. Olianas Vermentino ($23 at Jimmy’s) from Sardinia, the native home of the variety, layers white grapefruit and lemon zest with earthy minerality and spice. Duchman Vermentino ($18 at Spec’s), a Texas favorite, layers ripe pear, lemonade lemons and soft herbs.

Focused, lean, dry Riesling is ideal this time of year. Washington excels with excellent options, like the white flower and stone fruit filledColumbia Winery Ancient Lakes Riesling ($26 via their website) and Chateau Ste. Michelle Eroica ($22 at Spec’s), made in conjunction with German Riesling leader Dr. Loosen, revealing juicy apricot, peach, and spiced pear. Maryhill Riesling ($14 via their website) layers honeysuckle, ripe grapefruit, and lemon for a seafood-friendly option from Columbia Valley.

Elena Walch Gewurztraminer

Highly aromatic Alto Adige’s Elena Walch Gewurztraminer ($25 at Jimmy’s) melds ripe lychee, grapefruit, and ginger, with incredible acidity thanks to high elevation vineyards locking in freshness. Clif Family Anderson Valley Gewurztraminer ($30 via their website), reveals cinnamon, allspice, and golden pineapple in their spicy selection.

White peaches leap from a glass of Clif Family Viognier ($28), with texture and weight, making it ideal for food pairing. Napa’s Paraduxx Proprietary White  ($40) blends Viognier, Marsanne, and Roussanne with Chardonnay for an orchard and stone fruit filled selection with fresh acidity, balancing sweet floral and creme brûlée notes. Cline adds a touch of Riesling to their Marsanne and Roussanne blend ($24), enhancing the spiciness of the orange blossom and honey filled wine. Priest Ranch Grenache Blanc ($22) reveals similar notes of stone fruit while highlighting minerality, adding crushed and wet stone qualities to the wine. Sheid Grenache Blanc ($22) captures richness their textured, aromatic option from Monterey with golden apple and mineral notes. (All available via their websites.)

Comments

  • Stanley Tripson

    The only problem I see with this list is actually finding a place this kind of wine is being served at. Not that there’s a lack of good restaurants, but it’s always the ones with mediocre wines that I find.
    I’m very particular about my wine, and I spare no expense, but the problem today there’s just not enough supply.