In foodie circles, it’s considered a slap in a restaurant’s face to say its menu is “Americanized.” For many, the term means exotic flavors dumbed down for a super-sized society of McPalates. So let’s give owner Pardeep Sharma the benefit of the doubt. Yes, his Roti Grill has concept stamped all over it: counter service, fast food, and a menu that attempts to demystify the complexities of Indian cuisine. But Sharma also owns India Palace, one of the city’s top Indian restaurants. He knows enough to make Roti Grill accessible to newbies without alienating curry connoisseurs. So when you order vegetable samosas, you’ll happily find that the baseball-sized fried dumplings easily crack open to reveal a savory blend of peas, potatoes, and cumin. Likewise, entrées are an enticing lot. A large portion of them falls under the “Two-Step” section: choose your meat, choose your sauce, and then tell the cashier if you want it regular or “Texas.” (Hint: the Texas is big enough to share.) Here you’ll find all the Indian classics. Chicken korma—creamy, nutty, and slightly sweet—is the safest bet for Indian novices. Lamb saag features a delicious curried spinach sauce. Marinated in yogurt and garlic, chicken tandoori is cooked in a clay pot over hot charcoal, keeping the meat succulent. We wrapped our chunks of chicken in a slice of garlic-stuffed naan and layered on some mint chutney. Tasty. The only missteps we encountered were with two of Roti Grill’s appetizers. Onion bhajia—chickpea and onion fritters—were tough as hockey pucks. On the other hand, chili pakora—a chalkboard special most nights—was perfectly fried, but the pepper was so fiery that even my friend, an Indian food freak, could barely choke it down. He downed a mango lassi—a blended yogurt-fruit drink—but his tongue still tingled. However, Roti Grill’s hits are plentiful and authentic enough to make this Indian fast-food concept an American dream.

Get contact information for Roti Grill in Dallas and Roti Grill in Plano.