LETTERS

THE DISH ON DOWNTOWN

WHAT AN EXCITING ISSUE THE OCTOBER magazine turned out to be! But, how could an article [“The New Dallas,” October] so complete about what is going on downtown forget about the first “new residential development?” Namely Bryan Place. Ground was broken in 1979 and we moved into our zero-lot home in April 1980. We really lake pride in our neighborhood, and it shows that downtown living is just like living anywhere else-except better. (We get to spend more time at home.)

PATRICIA LEVITT

DALLAS



I WOULD LIKE TO THANK WICK ALLISON FOR taking the time to research and compile the excellent special edition. I was surprised to read that his initial response was so negative when he was first approached by the Central Dallas Association about writing the article. I guess being a young, native Dallasite, who offices in the Central Business District and lives nearby. I did not realize most people had such a bad image of downtown. I have felt for years that the Center City was Dallas’ best kept secret.

BARRY R. BURGESS

DALLAS



I READ WITH INTEREST “THE NEW DALLAS.” However, I was surprised and disappointed to see you omitted churches! Several vibrant churches have resisted the temptation to flee to the suburbs. Some of them, including First Baptist Church, bring several thousands of people downtown each week. These churches have many ministries particularly directed to the downtown community. You also neglected to acknowledge the educational advantage of the First Baptist Academy, with almost 1.000 students bringing life to the downtown area every day of the week.

SUSAN HAWKINS

DALLAS



It’s nice to finally see a local publica-tion extol the virtues of living in Dallas. Local publications like the Met, the Observer and The Dallas Morning News act like people are forced to live here and may as well make the best of it. I am a 10-year transplant from the Rocky Mountains, and I am proud to live in Dallas, and excited about the transformation of downtown!

MARK CARROLL

DALLAS



I FOUND IT INTERESTING THATTHE 29-STORY Magnolia Building, at the time of its completion in 1929, was known as the tallest building south of Washington. D.C.

The Smith-Young Tower ( now the Tower Life Building) in San Antonio was completed in 1929 and has 33 floors. It seems that even in 1929. Dallas civic pride was based on perception rather than reality.

MARK RYBCZYK

ON THE INTERNET



EDITOR’S NOTE: The Magnolia Building opened in 1922, not 1929 as we reported. Also, on page 19 of the “The New Dallas.” we said that the American Exchange National Bank Building is “now known as the Davis Building. ” The Davis Building is at 1309 Main St. and the pictured building. located at 1407 Main St.. was destroyed years ago. We regret both errors.



RECONSIDER REATA

I THINK YOUR ARTICLE ON REATA RESTAU-rant [“Dining Out,” October] was uncalled for. We ate there last weekend and the experience was totally enjoyable. In fact the manager, Dana Melton, helped us select a wine and checked on us frequently. Dana also gave me a card for a complimentary crème brulée because they were out. Of course, maybe they could tell by our accent that we were from Tarrant County.

LYNDA HOMER

ARLINGTON

Related Content

Newsletter

Keep me up to date on the latest happenings and all that D Magazine has to offer.

Comments