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Nature & Environment

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Harold Simmons
Publications

Harold Simmons Park 2.0 Planned for West Dallas

New, expanded plans will transform an industrial West Dallas neighborhood.
Palo Pinto State Park
Publications

North Texas Will Soon Welcome Palo Pinto Mountains State Park

Sometime in the coming months, North Texas will get its first new state park in 25 years.
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Trinity River

Fishing for Alligator Gar, the River Monsters of Dallas

Flowing between the two most populous urban areas in Texas, the Trinity River is home to one of the largest freshwater fish in the country.
David Burrows on roof of Fairmont Hotel with bee hive
Publications

You Can Find David Burrows’ Honeycombs All Over Dallas

A Dallas chief marketing officer turned honeybee advocate is out to save the world–one pollinator at a time.
Lake life
Summer

Diaries of a Cedar Creek Lake Pioneer

Swimming areas, lawn chairs, Coleman stoves, barefoot water skiing, and one of the fastest boats on the water defined the humble beginnings of Cedar Creek Lake in the 1960s. No one knew what was to come.
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Latest

Robert Kent
Parks

The Land Man: How Dallas Is Fueling a Historic Parks Boom

Robert Kent, the director for the Trust of Public Land and his wealthy donors want to buy up what little green space remains in Dallas. In Oak Cliff, they just began their most ambitious project yet.
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Commercial Real Estate

Age-Old Farmland Is Now Fresh Shoreline and Bois d’Arc Lake Is Born

In an effort to hydrate Frisco and Plano, Bois d'Arc Lake is the first Texas reservoir built in nearly 30 years. And there's still work to do.
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Nature & Environment

A River Remembered: The Surprising History of White Rock Creek

This piece was first published in the magazine in October 1979. Writer David Dillon takes a journey along legendary White Rock Creek from prehistory to what was then the present.
Ned Fritz
Nature & Environment

How Ned Fritz and Others Fought for the Trinity River

Fifty years ago, Dallas killed a plan that would have turned the Trinity River into a barge canal. The journalist Laray Polk recounted that history in our March issue.
Trinity River
Dallas History

What Would Dallas Look Like If the Trinity River Was a Barge Canal? We Will Never Know.

Fifty years ago, the city decided that, no, the Trinity River should not be turned into a barge canal all the way to Galveston. Let’s celebrate that vote and Ned Fritz, the man who made it happen.
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