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Style

Are These Billboard Boots on Scott Griggs’ Feet? A D Magazine Guess-Tigation

| 2 years ago

In the past few days, council members Philip Kingston, Adam Medrano, and Omar Narvaez have all tweeted a photo of an electronic billboard along Interstate 35 that features some boots and a date. Former Councilwoman Angela Hunt has, too. Even Kingston’s wife, Melissa, has gotten in on the fun. Scott Griggs, the term-limited North Oak Cliff council member who is widely rumored to be running for mayor, has not tweeted out this photo of billboard boots. Maybe that’s because he sees them every day.

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Style

The Bush Center’s First Ladies Exhibit Proves a Jacket Is Not Just a Jacket

| 2 years ago

In March, I had the pleasure of meeting former first lady Laura Bush at the George W. Bush Presidential Center, where she gave me a tour of the exhibit First Ladies: Style of Influence, running through October 1.

She showed me the Bill Blass gown she wore to a state dinner. She showed me a reproduction of the dress Dolley Madison had made from the White House’s velvet drapes, which Madison saved before the British set fire to the capital. She showed me camo-trimmed aprons that military wives gave Michelle Obama. And she showed me the modest pantsuit she wore to visit with women in Afghanistan in 2008. The outfit included a scarf tied around the neck, so she could pull it up and cover her hair if she felt it was necessary.

Walking around the exhibit, I found that for first ladies—who, by joining their husbands in the White House, accepted the roles of hostess, diplomat, activist, and advocate—a dress is never just a dress, a gift is never just a gift, and something as small as a scarf can make all the difference when it comes to diplomacy and respect. With the eyes of the world on first ladies, what they wear is never meaningless.

It’s an exhibit the current first lady could learn a thing or two from.

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Style

Are Men Ready for Makeup? Blushington Thinks So

| 3 years ago

BEFORE

I am going to look so pretty, is what I tell myselfand the chorus of posturing macho jocks, a gang of grizzled Clint Eastwood types jeering at me from an adolescent and outdated corner of my imaginationas I head into Blushington on a Monday afternoon for a skin peel, some eyebrow maintenance, and a little light contouring.

Well-groomed men are in. This magazine told me so. Old notions of masculinity, reinforced by an unjust patriarchal society and oppressively limiting gender roles, are rightfully crumbling. Men moisturize now. Peels and, sure, a touch of concealer, aren’t that much further down the road of chemically assisted beauty. Give me fat glittering gobs of makeup, while you’re at it. Why would I want to be dusty Clint Eastwood when I can be radiant David Bowie?

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Style

Strong, Differing Opinions on Men’s Grooming Face Off

| 3 years ago

It might seem strange to some that I—a woman whose upper lip has nothing that a Sally Hansen bleach kit can’t handle—would produce a feature on men’s grooming for the October issue of D Magazine. But those who know me, and particularly those who drink with me, are aware that my feelings on men’s facial hair are strong and impassioned.

I guess I am something of a beard enthusiast. I don’t necessarily like long beards, or weird beards with braids or dreads or beads or other embellishments, but I simply believe in beards. All men, in my opinion, look better with a healthy coating of fur—with the exception of one, and that is Jon Hamm, whose face is so extremely good looking it should never be covered up.

My beard rant also includes notes on kissing: when I close my eyes and lean in, there should be no question that I am smooching a man. And when a make-out sesh goes longer than a few minutes, my chin should be raw and red as a knee scuffed on asphalt. It was after I had shocked my coworkers with this diatribe, that my fuzzy-faced boss Tim Rogers spoke up: “You should talk to my wife. She hates my beard.”

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Personalities

Meet Leon Bridges’ Favorite Dallas Barber

| 3 years ago

Well-coiffed hair is inherent for any great sense of style. A put-together ensemble can only get you so far if your locks are lacking. So, when we found out that 20 percent of D Magazine’s “10 Most Stylish” in Dallas have trusted their split ends with the same gentleman, we knew we had to meet him.

Expectations were high for Juke Higgins. After all, Leon Bridges had called this guy out in the pages of Vogue and on stage at Austin City Limits. The Dallas Contemporary’s senior curator Justine Ludwig, who once saw Bridges break into an impromptu performance in his shop, has followed him faithfully for three years. “Juke is funny and has some great stories. It’s like getting a haircut and a show,” Ludwig told us in an email. “He’s a fascinating person and the best barber in town.”

Higgins did not disappoint. Over the phone, the Dallas native shared his journey from the Marine Corps to co-owning his own shop in downtown Dallas, and the beatboxing origins of the name “Juke.”

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Style

A Primer on Our 10 Most Stylish In Dallas Feature

| 3 years ago

Being totally honest, I wasn’t thrilled at the prospect of doing another most stylish feature when the idea got brought up at an editorial meeting. Print had already passed on it. It runs the risk of being a tired concept, a rundown of fashion trends and little else. But we started talking it through and something special gradually emerged.

The piece we published on Thursday is, yes, a chronicling of the city’s most stylish people. But it’s more about self-expression and individualism and entrepreneurial vision. Of the 10 people chosen, some own businesses, some are world famous musicians, some are clothing designers, others are art curators. They are all creators of some sort, and this piece celebrates their drive, intellect, and curiosity. And so, in a way, the idea of style was simply an entry point into studying people who are making our city great—which is D’s whole reason for being here.

Enjoy the photos and videos, taken by our incredible photographer Elizabeth Lavin. Spend some time with the words, which were written by Hilary Lau after spending time with each of the individuals. Take a look at what they put together for us—Forty Five Ten allowed each participant to choose a white shirt and then come up with the style they put around it. There were no stylists—it’s all from their heads. You’ll want to see Erykah Badu.

It’s a diverse group—in race, age, gender, occupation—of knowns and unknowns, all interesting in their own way. I’m thrilled with how it turned out, and I think you will be too. Here are photos from the reveal party last night, if that’s your thing. Print, by the way, did an about-face; it’ll be in the November issue.

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Dallas History

The Adolphus Hotel’s Wild Carpet Remodel

| 3 years ago

Photograph by Cody Ulrich

An image of Dallas model Lisa Bull in a leather dress, rowing a canoe down a floral-carpeted hallway in the Adolphus Hotel—that’s hard to forget. So it’s not surprising that was the first thing Jamie Laubhan-Oliver, D Home‘s creative director, brought up when we talked about the hotel’s recent remodel. Back in 2013, Jamie had been the art director of “A Night at the Adolphus,” a Through the Looking Glass-inspired shoot of a mother and daughter’s trippy storybook staycation for D Moms. Jamie took full advantage of the 1980s excess, staging shots of Bull and her daughter in full glamour mode against wall-to-wall patterned carpeting, pastoral murals, trompe l’oeil Greek columns, and the French Room’s candy cane painted ceilings.

The carpet and murals are no more. Swoon, the Dallas design firm helming the hotel’s remodel, has gone back to the basics, restoring the original marble floors and the French Room’s wedding-cake-white ceilings. But they left a number of Easter eggs along the way, hinting at the hotel’s storied past, from the chandelier that twins the one hanging in the Anheuser-Busch stables to the piano that avoided a trip on the Titanic. You’ll find a number of them identified in the September feature, “Staying Power.” But we left at least one out. Hanging above the concierge desk, you’ll find a photo of a bedazzled rabbit mask by Thom Jackson. The photo, specifically requested by Joslyn Taylor at Swoon for the remodel, is from Jamie’s 2013 shoot. It serves as an eye-catching reminder of what once covered the hotel’s well-traveled floors.

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