Buona Salute: Eat your broccoli rapini with sausage on this pizze bianche. Kevin Marple

Restaurant Review

Pizzeria Testa’s Dallas Outpost Is Getting Warmer

The pies from the Neapolitan-style restaurant’s second location are perfectly simple. But not perfect yet.

Wayward Sons closed on Greenville Avenue in 2017. The pizzeria that replaced it, Pizzeria Testa, is the second outpost of the Frisco-based, family-owned business. You cannot miss the glittering domes of the two Italian-made wood-fired ovens that turn out pizzas from their 1,000-degree heat. The pies blister in seconds, though keeping them hot in the vast 6,000-square-foot space on Greenville Avenue seemed to present a challenge on a recent visit.

The second location, like the first, focuses on Neapolitan-style pies: the crusts are not crisp and cracker-thin, a fashion that emerged in recent years, but puffy, airy, and springy from imported double-zero flour and distinctively charred from the scorching heat. The edges are chewy, the undercarriage floppy.

You’ll find the dough in several iterations. First, the faux-focaccia, essentially a doppelganger of the pies. We nibbled it alongside an unimpressive charcuterie board, with provolone, rubbery mortadella, speck, buttery castelvetrano olives, and salami with a slightly rank flavor under its notes of fennel. One of the best items that evening was a crispy pancetta salad with tart dressing. Wines, which come in three pour sizes, include primarily well-chosen Italians, like a bold agliatica or a lovely, medium-bodied pinot bianco.

As traditional would dictate, the pizza’s primary cheeses are mozzarella di bufala and fior di latte, the latter so milky its name gave birth to a milky ice cream flavor in Italy. The Vesuvio calzone, draped in prosciutto slices, is a hot-cold contrast that must be eaten quickly, before it collapses into a soppy mess. One of the pizze bianche—broccoli rapini and sausage—needed more punch. The crust was blistered, but not enough, and it was not merely floppy, but soupy-centered.

That night, rosettes—bready balls with fontina, smoked mozzarella, basil, and prosciutto cotto—never got beyond the blond and doughy phase. The tiramisu needed more soaking and fewer drifts of bitter cocoa.

Such was the theme: they’ve nailed the simplicity of ingredients and the friendly atmosphere, but the balance was off. Next time, I’ll sit closer to the ovens and hope they’re fiercely stoked. The foundation is there. They need just a little more to make it a neighborhood pizzeria.

Newsletter

Our SideDish newsletter features Dallas’s newest dining spots, scrumptious recipes from local restaurants, and news on breweries, cocktail hours and more.

Find It

Search our directories for...

Restaurants

Restaurants

Bars

Bars

Tex-Mex

Tex-Mex

BBQ

BBQ

View All

View All

Comments