Cultural Connection: Beatnik’s wall of textiles always includes several of the designer-beloved Beni Ourain rugs. Elizabeth Lavin

Bishop Arts District

Oak Cliff’s New Shops Are Among the City’s Most Eclectic

Shopping is thriving in Bishop Arts and beyond.

Moroccan Flair

Dallas retail veteran Lindsey Munchrath had just opened her own clothing and home decor boutique, Beatnik, last September when she rekindled a friendship that proved fruitful. A “soul sister” had left Dallas to globe-trot and ended up planting roots in Morocco, providing an instant conduit to all the handmade seagrass baskets, sequined wedding blankets, Beni Ourain wool rugs, and leather poufs Munchrath could ever dream of. The two young moms FaceTime most days (Munchrath gets up at 6 am to accommodate the six-hour difference), and each month, Munchrath gets a new batch of handcrafted Moroccan finds from souks (outdoor markets) and Berber villages. This summer, she debuted three styles of raffia slippers—her own design, made in Morocco—to add to the store’s mix of indie fashion labels. She will celebrate Beatnik’s one-year anniversary with a market of 20-plus local artisans September 23 from 12 to 4 pm.

Adorable Affordable Giftables

The name of Kristen Miller’s shop, All Good Things, says it all. Within the store’s bright white walls:

Lifestyle essentials, such as Baggu pouches and easy-to-rummage makeup bags. Clarity large clutch, $48

Home goods, such as cute doormats, wooden spoons, and scented candles. Marble and brass tray, $45

Baby shower buys, including blankets, books, and apothecary kits for new moms. Bunny ear teether, $14

Paper goods, including journals, coffee-table books, and a wall of bespoke cards. Moglea card, $6

Everyday accessories, such as simple gold necklaces and chunky earrings. Seed Bead circle earrings, $28

Indoor Greenery

Urban Oasis: much has been said about Oak Cliff’s growth, but one thing’s for sure: the shopping options are livelier than ever. In just over a year, a handful of life-beautifying boutiques have cropped up, including the Oasis Plant Shop, a haven overflowing with flora.

Two former Ruibal’s staffers, Hannah Street and Bethany Mieth, help hopeful green thumbs find their new best fronds at Oasis Plant Shop. The pair also offers in-home plant installation and event rental services.

What’s the fussiest houseplant? The fiddle-leaf fig—and it’s the most popular.

Any secrets to survival? They would love to be in a bright window that receives indirect light, they don’t like to be moved or touched, and they don’t like a drafty space. Some of the most beautiful fiddles are ones in a bright corner left alone forever. A regular watering schedule is also really important. Once you figure that regimen out, it is vital to keep it up.

Can you name some low-maintenance plants that are just as photogenic? Dracaena Tarzan, Kentia Palm, Rubber Tree—not the bush version—and Bird of Paradise, to name a few.

Midcentury Modern

Molly Mathias started out as an accountant, but found the work painfully boring (shocking). For fun, she and her mom, Mary Ann, started buying and restoring vintage furniture, a hobby that soon outgrew their homes thanks to the styled decor vignettes Molly created for Instagram (@mmvintage59). That tradition continues in her shop, Magic Hour, where she always has a living room setup surrounded by home accessories, plus clothing and jewelry. A few of Molly’s tips for scouting old furniture at flea markets:

“If you’re buying anything upholstered, you should smell it. If it has a really bad smell, don’t buy it, because it could be in the foam.”

“Sit on it. If it feels hard or crunchy, then you’ll have to replace the foam and it can get pretty expensive.”

“Don’t be afraid of dressers that have a few scratches. Once you put it in your house and put stuff on top of it, you probably won’t notice them.”

New Age Elements

The main event at the dramatic charcoal-washed boutique Harkensback is co-owner Julie McCullough’s eponymous Dallas-made clothing line, but the extras are just as much reason to shop. McCullough can often be found in the store’s corner, making leather goods or blending essential oil scents. Another draw is the crystal bar with 36 stones for the picking.

“I’ve always been collecting rocks, but I didn’t know the meanings or healing properties until a trip to Marfa seven years ago,” McCullough says. “My favorite one is a really large, multifaceted smoky quartz that I found in Arkansas. My grandmother gave me one when I was a kid, so I’ve always been kind of obsessed with the dark stone.”

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