Photography by Josh Blaylock

The Top Dallas Farmers Markets

Your guide to finding great local fruits and vegetables.

Collin County Farmers Market

Murphy

BASICS

Plano’s Spring Creek Organic Farm supplies the market with most of its produce, and everything else is organic and Texas-grown. Beginning this season, the market offers tastings and recipe suggestions for vegetables people either don’t usually like or don’t know what to do with.

SPECIALTIES

Micro-roasted coffee from Plano’s Coffee del Rey, priced between $14 and $20 per pound. The company stocks beans from Ethiopia, the Dominican Republic, and Uganda. Try the Philosopher’s Blend, its darkest roast, or Three-Licious Blend, which combines coffees from three countries for a rich brew with hints of fruit and dark chocolate.

EXTRAS

The nonprofit market has a strong focus on family and community. From the annual Cinco de Mayo celebration to its Brew and Burgers event, the calendar stays full. Last season, the market had classes on drip irrigation, bokashi composting, and canning.

Coppell Farmers Market

BASICS

It’s managed by the Coppell Community Garden, which rotates produce vendors. One is Eric Katzenberger, owner of Greens and Goodies. He brings a variety of organically grown produce (and German-style baked goods) to the market weekly. The selection varies by season, from baby onions to heirloom tomatoes, cilantro, and garlic.

SPECIALTIES

Just Pie has an arsenal of family recipes that includes buttermilk and fresh berry custard. It offers a Saturday pickup service through the market. Sundance Gardens sells difficult-to-find plants, and owner Jill Holden makes spicy dill pickles, strawberry jam, and salsas. Holden is also known for her scones.

EXTRAS

In addition to a new pavilion that includes fans and heated restrooms, Coppell has a kid-friendly, market-themed playground and an interactive fountain. Adults can find yoga, boot camps, and tai chi classes. Looking ahead, its Farm to Table Dinner, highlighting food from the market’s farmers and producers, is scheduled forJune 6.

Dallas Farmers Market

Downtown Dallas

BASICS

The variety of vendors (including Dallas’ Stubblefield Produce) allows for things like asparagus, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. Raspberries from Quinlan can be found in April, May, and June, and late spring and summer bring peaches from Canton. You’ll find eggs, herbs, honey, lettuce, and a variety of meats throughout the year.

SPECIALTIES

Within the market’s well-constructed maze of produce is Boom Juice, manned by Davio Ventouras. He creates and sells an assortment of 100-percent organic juices and coffees. Boom Juice partners with the market’s produce vendors to create some of its products.

EXTRAS

Remodeled and renamed, The Market (formerly known as Shed 2) will soon include Rex’s Seafood Market, Stocks & Bondy, and Palmieri Cafe. Market After Dark—aimed at getting downtown dwellers to come to the new shopping pavilion, The Shed—resumes on March 10 from 6-10 pm.

Four Seasons Markets

Fairview, Richardson

BASICS

Both of these markets feature produce from 5 Star Farm. Get your protein fix from the grass-fed-meat vendors, HindsFeet Farm and Terra Sienna. (Grass-fed animals have less total and saturated fat, and more minerals and vitamins than grain-fed animals.) HindsFeet Farm offers pork, beef, chicken, and eggs. Terra Sienna has dry-aged beef. 

SPECIALTIES

Four Seasons Bakery carries scones and sweet breads from Florine Bowman Pastries. They are made fresh and are additive- and preservative-free. The types of bread available differ by location: Richardson sells sourdough and whole wheat breads, while Fairview has fruit-infused, gluten-free, and vegan selections.

EXTRAS

The European-style setup of both markets allows ranchers, farmers, and craftsmen to interact with customers. The Fairview location’s bistro serves food prepared with produce and meats from the market’s vendors. The retail space gives visitors the opportunity to shop throughout the week. It is open 10 am to 6 pm, Tuesday through Sunday.

Farmers Market of Grapevine

farmersmarketof-grapevine.com
Grapevine

BASICS

When in season, peaches are in abundance here, supplied by Canton’s The Pilgrim Family Farm and Waxahachie’s Larken Farms. The latter brings 30 varieties of Texas and California peaches, as well as Santa Rosa plums, Hosui Asian pears, and blackberries. There is also a juicy selection of heirloom tomatoes from Blue River Farms.

SPECIALTIES

Up-and-comer Dream Girls Dairy has proved to be a customer favorite with its goat milk-based soaps and lotions. Brazos Valley Cheese has a selection of handcrafted cheeses, including smoked gouda, brie, white cheddar, and horseradish pecan cheddar.

EXTRAS

Each summer, the market hosts a peach festival; the date varies. And in September, its vendors put on a festival dedicated to the ever-popular Hatch chile.

White Rock Local Market

White Rock, Lakeside, Vickery Meadow

BASICS

You can find seasonal produce from 20 area farmers across the three markets, including eggs from Denton’s Blue Yarn Farms and Corsicana’s JuHa Ranch, and cucumbers, carrots, beets, and kohlrabi from Celeste’s Good Earth Organic Farm. Also: urban gardeners sell plants.

SPECIALTIES

Dallas-based Citas Salsas has fresh, small-batch salsas in flavors ranging from Garden Green to Holy Habanero, all priced under $8. Mölli’s marinades and cooking sauces, like its Aztec-inspired Mexico City sauce, help you try out authentic recipes at home.

EXTRAS

In addition to cooking demonstrations and workshops, the market encourages community interaction by hosting an annual pie contest and chili cook-off. Last year’s chili cook-off consisted of four categories: traditional, spicy, vegetarian, and wild card. The best part: marketgoers get to pick the winners.

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