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MORE THAN 165 OF THE BEST DOCTORS IN DALLAS-FORT WORTH

You could enlist a research firm to find the perfect doctor for you. But such searches are done primarily for rare cases and cost about $2,000 apiece.

Fortunately, D has saved you the time and money. Here are more than 165 of the area’s top doctors as rated by doctors themselves. We obtained the survey results from South Carolina-based Woodward/White Inc., a national research company that has been researching doctors since 1981. Doctors are asked which of their colleagues they would go to in each of the major specialties.

From the survey, we extracted the results in nine specialties-allergy and immunology, dermatology, family medicine, geriatric medicine, general internal medicine, general obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology, general pediatrics, and psychiatry. Our criterion for these specialties was simple: These are doctors that you’d be likely to visit once a year rather than once in a lifetime.

Then, we bring you face-to-face with doctors from each specialty-chosen at random from the list-because, like you, we like to have an idea of the kind of person we’ll be dealing with.

To see the entire list-with more than 700 doctors in additional specialties such as cardiovascular disease and surgical oncology-visit Z)’s web site at www.dmagazine.com , But act fast: The online list has been made available to us for only one month.

DRS. MICHAEL RUFF & GARY GROSS



Allergy/Immunology

These doctors may be your own personal saviors.

For Gary Gross and Michael Ruff, the thrill is en the hunt.

Maybe their specialty, allergies and asthma, doesn’t sound too sexy. But in the land of mountain cedar, long growing seasons, and gusty winds that we call home, these doctors may be your personal saviors.

“You can be the best Alzheimer’s doctor or the best oncologist in the world, but you cran still do your best and not help a patient,” Ruff says. “We can help. I’m treating a boy who right now can’t go on his Cub Scout camping trip. I can fix that. And he’ll think I’ve hung the moon. That’s neat.”

Gross started the Dallas Allergy & Asthma Center 20 years ago, with Ruff joining in 1987. It works because the Dallas natives are so much alike. And so different.

Gross has a background in internal medicine, and Ruff’s is in pediatrics. Gross, who prefers patients who can speak in complete sentences, works with the adults who find their way to the clinic. Huff, who grows weary of the geriatric tendency to drone on about illnesses, handles the kids.

They share a respect for their patients and an obsession with getting to the bottom of allergies and asthma, problems they now are able to treat only at the symptomatic level. Sure, they can treat your child’s wheezing. Bui they’d rather be able to treat, and cure, what starts that wheezing.

To that end, research is an important facet of the clinic. Willing patients spend hour:; at the clinic, trying out FDA-approved drugs that aren’t yet available. The benefits to the doctors are a look at the most cutting-edge medications and techniques, as well as a closer relationship with their patients. The benefits to the patients? Pizza, your own personal nurse, and results you can’t buy at Walgreen’s quite yet.

“We don’t know why, but asthma has seen an increase in the last 20 years,” Ruff says, “There are many thoughts. That the world is more industrialized. That there is less parasitic disease, and so the immune system needs something to do. Then there is diesel exhaust and our airtight houses, which keep everything in.”

It’s obvious that Ruff continued to learn once he joined Gross. He quotes “Garyisms,” which the elder doctor appreciates because he says he can’t remember them.

Garyism No. 1 : The best time to treat an asd\ma attack is 48 hours before it happens.

Garyism No. 2: Treat patients the way you’d like your family to be treated.

Garyism No. 3: When you walk in that exam room, remember that visit is the most important thing in that patient’s life right then.-Dawn McMullan

DR. ROBERT TAU GUNBY JR.

Obstelrics/Gynecology

He started catching babies like fly balls.

IMAGINE NO SONOGRAMS. NO BIRTHING ROOMS WITH ROCKING chairs and pretty wallpaper. And not a dad in sight.

When Robert Gunby Jr. started delivering babies, that was the scene. Two years ago, when Baylor Medical Center decided to convert all of its traditional delivery rooms into 14 birthing rooms-where soon-to-be mothers could labor, give birth, and recover in the same room-he was leery.

“We were so used to having all the high-tech equipment in sight.” he says. “But we’ve learned it makes people nervous to be wired up all the time. With the birthing rooms, we try to keep all the monitors in the closet nearby. We’ve got it all there. We could even do a C-section in those rooms if we had to.”

These days, he wonders about a dad who doesn’t show up for at least one appointment. And he’s embarrassed to describe some of the positions he finds his laboring mothers in.

Gunby remembers when fathers were first allowed in the delivery room. One, who didn’t think he’d make it through, stood up in his chair when Gunby caught the baby.

“Wow,” he said.

Gunby, after almost three decades of birthing babies, still agrees.

That wasn’t the case when he came to Dallas for his residency 28 years ago, planning to be a plastic surgeon. He wasn’t impressed with his obstetrics training in medical school: “I had two patients. One had toxemia, and this was before fetal monitoring, so I had to keep my hand on her tummy for 24 hours. I thought this was the most boring thing possible. And another who had the baby in the pan almost instantaneously. I remember thinking, ’Is this all there is to it?’”

That changed when he started catching babies 1 ike fly balls during his residency at Baylor Medical Center. He was hooked on the high of handing babies to their parents.

The changes in the birth process over the past two decades have been good ones, Gunby says.

In a specialty involving hormonal women and tremendously varying trends, Gunby has spent a career wisely going with the flow.

“I haven’t changed the way I practice,” he says with a slight and soothing Georgia accent. “I’ve always felt people should have a personal experience and do what’s right for them. Nowadays, with birthing plans, women are more upfront about what they want. And as with most things in medicine, there are many ways to do things that work out OK. I’m willing to do almost anything as long as it’s not hard on the baby.”-D.M.

DR. SUSAN JEANNE HUBBARD



Pediatrics

“Its tough to be a parent today.”

BEING A MOM MAKES SUS AN HUBBARD A BETTER PEDIATRICIAN. Being a pediatrician makes her a belter mom.

From the beginning of her career, the fact that Hubbard was a woman with children has played a role. When she joined Pediatrics Associates of Dallas 15 years ago. she was the first female doctor in the practice. She had her oldest son two weeks after finishing her residency and started work five months later.

She left the practice for a while to stay home after having her second son. And now, with three boys ages 15, 12, and 9, she works part-time.

“All of this was new for the male doctors in the practice,” she says, laughing. “When I started, there were so few women pediatricians in Dallas. It was new ground.”

Because she was the only woman for almost a decade, she inherited many adolescent girls who felt more comfortable with a female doctor, a choice they hadn’t had in the past. These days, Hubbard and the other women in the practice still see many teenage girls, often for eating disorders.

“The first five years I was in practice, I saw one eating disorder,” she says. “Now it is so common.”

She’s also seen a rise in sick babies and toddlers, as more families require day care. She sees more single-family homes. And more stressed kids.

Being a pediatrician isn’t all shots and exams. It’s the psychology of the job that you don’t learn in medical school. Hubbard says.

“You deal with a lot of parenting issues with first babies,” she says. “And that’s what we’re supposed to do. The frustrating part comes with the older kids, with behavior problems, depression, eating disorders. At that point, it’s not, ’Take pink medicine and corne back in 10 days.”’ Often, this is where being a mother is invaluable, she says. When a parent has been up all night, she understands. When they’re worried about a depressed teenager and the Colorado school shootings on TV, she can empathize. To reach parents on a broader basis, Hubbard also does a segment every other Tuesday on Good Morning Texas, discussing common issues and illnesses of children.

“It’s tough to be a kid today,” she says. “It’s tough to be a parent today.” “There%s not a formula,” she says. “That’s what I’ve learned as a physician and as a parent. It’s luck, prayer, and the moon and the stars and the sun all lined up together.”-DM.

DR. WILLIAM ROBERT BEAVERS



Psychiatry

He’s spent his career treating dysfuctional families.

“I WAS WEIGHING A RAT AORTA, MEASURING THE INTRA- AND extra-cellular potassium and sodium,” recalls Robert Beavers.

That’s the exact moment the University of Texas pharmacology professor decided to switch to psychiatry. He’d always preferred reading Freud to pathology, anyway. “I always identified with the patients in the psych wards,” he says. “They couldn’t get a song out of their heads. I do that. They were paranoid, I was like that sometimes. They were my kinda folks.”

Still, Beavers was haunted by the rat, so to speak-he couldn’t give up research. He wanted to know why the depressed and psychotic never seemed to be cured.

“We were sending these partially healed-up folks home, and they were coming back,” he says. “We were sending that depressed adolescent right back to his family.” He’s always believed one person’s problems were a family’s problems, so he’s spent most of his career treating dysfunctional families. Yet he’s known around the world for his research in healthy families.

A Hillsboro boy, Beavers supported his family while he was in high school, working a 241.43-acre farm (he remembers the acreage exactly). Today, his resume is 14 pages long. Beavers, 69, is internationally known for developing the Beavers Systems Model of Family Assessment, a tool for determining the health of a family. He bases the system on decades of studying healthy families of all cultures and socio-economic groups.

“We learn so much more by seeing what does work than what doesn’t work,” he says.

He would, for example, take a top executive who was dysfunctional at home and show him how he could use what he did at work-his strengths of problem solving and controlling emotions-at home. It was a strength mode! instead of a deficit model, he explains.

You won’t find Beavers’ name in any of your managed health-care books. He doesn’t like the restrictions and refuses to join. But he’s been consulting with managed-care firms to make die system better for the past decade.

With a donation of $1.4 million to SMU, he established the Robert Beavers Family Studies Center in 1997. Under his direction, graduate psychology students gain experience as family counselors while they research family systems. The students work with various local agencies, giving support primarily to inner-city, high-risk families.

Beavers’ psychiatry is about empowerment. A troubled teen isn’t alone: He has parents, siblings, teachers, and doctors who must all work together to make things right. “I have no idea what my patients need to do for themselves,” he says. “My job is to help them find their way. not tell them their way.”-DM.

DR. CARL EDWARD COUCH



Family Practice

Couch describes doctors as captives to managed care.

WHEN ATTACKING A MONSTER LIKE MANAGED CARE, CARL COUCH thinks the larger and more organized the opponent, the better the chance for victory.

The albatross around every patient and physician’s neck- this “mother-may-I” form of health care, as Couch describes it-simply won’t do.

Managed care promised many things: that it was interested in quality health care; that in return for a small discount. doctors would get lots of patients; that doctors in the groups would share information for the benefit of everyone; that it would be simple; and that patients would be thrilled with the entire system.

That’s not what we got.

Couch describes doctors as “captives” to managed care and is frustrated dial cost, not patient care, is the bottom line to such companies. Any shared data is used against the doctors threateningly, to compare how many x-rays this doctor used compared to that doctor, for example.

“And the hassles, to the physicians and the patients,” he laments. “Every doctor in Dallas has had to hire the equivalent of one to one-and-a-half people to deal with nothing but managed care. And the patients truly wonder. ’Will you do the best for me, or are you forced to give me the cheapest care?’”

He jokes that he spends 60 percent of his time with his patients, when he assures the best care, and 60 percent in his leadership role at Health Texas, an umbrella practice of Metroplex doctors (mostly family practitioners) owned by Baylor Medical Center. His own practice, which now employs 22 physicians-including his daughter-was die first practice Baylor ever purchased.

Couch believes in long-term relationships. He’s been married for 34 years and has had the same nurse for 29 years. He sees his commitment to changing the health-care system as a long-term goal, too, one that he now fights with the backing of a major hospital and 270 other doctors.

But, he hopes, we will end up with a more palatable, hopefully more patient-centered, version. “I believe we can build a better system,” he says. “I believe I have a God-given responsibility to do the best I can for any given patient, to be honest with them and treat them with dignity. I believe the care comes first.”-DM.

DR. CRAIG RUBIN

Geriatric Medicine

“When people are frail , there’s a need for caring providers.”

“MANY PEOPLE THINK THAT THERE’S NO DIFFERENCE BETWEEN adults and the elderly,” says Craig Rubin, “but that’s notreally accurate.”

After completing his residency in internal medicine at UT Southwestern, Rubin, in collaboration with Parkland, accepted a grant to study initiatives in long-term care for the elderly. The demand for physicians interested in older people was so great that he became immersed in the specialty. “Not many people are interested in aging or ils problems because the answers are not always clear,” he says. “That didn’t bother me.”

Rubin says that his specialty has made significant strides in recent years. “Today, more people know what the term ’geriatrics’ is.” he says; however, there is still a lack of appreciation tor some of the very basic issues. “Today, geriatrics has an overwhelming demographic that is just starting to receive the attention and commitment that will be required.”

As chief of the geriatrics section at UT Southwestern, position he’s held since 1989. Rubin is responsible for developing the hospital “s Geriatrics Program, which includes geriatric clinics at Parkland and the St Paul/UTSW Health Center. In addition, the geriatric section has developed links with departments that overlap it, such as psychology and physical medicine.

He divides his time between patients, administrative duties, and clinical research, mostly on osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease. Balancing those duties can be a chal-lenge. “The complexity of patient problems and the focus on function in geriatric medicine distinguishes it from the typical primary care practice,” Rubin says. Providing care can be harder in the geriatrics field because of time constraints. The average age of Rubin’s patients is in the mid-80s; “Someone said it takes 15 minutes just to say hello to an elderly person,” he notes.

“I see a lot of people who have come for second opinions; they often had the right evaluation elsewhere, but the problem was never carefully explained,” Rubin says.

Especially in geriatrics, that clinical experience must be coupled with people skills.

“When people are frail, there’s a need for sensitive, caring providers.”-Jennifer Wegman

DR. F. DAVID WINTER JR



Internal Medicine

Winter is a big believer in one-on-one medicine.

YOU COULD SEE DAVID WINTER THE OLD-FASHIONED WAY AND make an appointment for an office visit. Or you could tune in to Channel 8 for his HealthSource segment on the early-moming or noon news. You can listen to a similar segment on the Internet by logging on to Broadcast.com. You can even log on and see the Beaumont native and his son proudly displaying a 10-pound bass they caught down on Lake Fork.

The point is. he’s accessible. Which is what Winter believes a good doctor should be. Winter is everywhere-a hands-on doctor who will meet you at the emergency room in the middle of me night and a high-tech physician for the masses.

It’s the one-on-one stuff around which Winter centers his practice–a practice he started alone and now shares with 22 partners.

“One patient may call me at 3 a.m.. and I know I need to just talk them through that moment, reassure them, and maybe follow up the next day,” he says. “Another calls at 3 a.m. and I want them to go to the emergency room imme-diately. You have to know your patients to know the difference. It is as important for a doctor to know a patient as it is for patients to know then doctor.”

So how does the one-on-one approach reconcile with the studio lights in his office? “On a really busy day, I can see 20 people in the office,” he says. “When I go on Channel 8,1 can reach hundreds of thousands. I’ve had people send me letters, call me. and e-mail me, talking about how because of what they saw on the air. they found something in themselves or theirspouse or the kids that made a difference in their health.”

Winter often finds his toughest choices are ones involving his time. Office visits. TV spots. Internet features. A son who wants him to fish. A daughter who wants him to shop. A wife. Not to mention those 3 a.m. patient calls.

“I had a doctor who had been in practice for 40 years once tell me that, after 40 years, he didn’t have patients. He had friends,” Winter says. “When you get those calls at 3 a.m.,you can always solve a problem or help somebody through something. Sure, you’re tired on the way to the hospital. But you can feel good about yourself, your patient, and medicine in general when you drive home. There’s nothing like that.”-DM.

DR. LAURA L. SEARS



Dermatology

“I said goodbye to the sun when I left medical school.”WEAR SUNSCREEN.

These words are not only the beginning of Lee Perry’s billboard hit, they are words Laura Sears lives by. The dermatologist, who grew up in Highland Park, puts sunscreen on herself and her two pale-skinned, red-haired toddlers every day, regardless of the season.

“One day, the nanny was taking them out, and it was after dark,” Sears says. “The oldest says, “Wail. I don’t have my sunscreen.* In the dark. I was so proud.”

During her 14 years as a practicing dermatologist. Sears has seen a rise in skin cancer or melanoma, despite attempts to educate the public about the dangers of sun worship. And no, she wants you to know, tanning beds aren’t any better. In fact, there is legislation before the state House of Representatives to regulate tanning salons, an idea Sears supports.

“I said goodbye to the sun when 1 left medical school,” she says. “Of course, I got one last tan so I would look good at graduation. But that was it.”

Will anything convince the public that their healthy tan isn’t so healthy? Sears doesn’t think so. It’s almost impossible to convince a high-school or college student that their beautiful brown skin will someday cause wrinkles and possibly skin cancer.

“They don’t care,” she says. “It’s just public perception that a tan makes you look healthy. It used to be that the poor worked on the farms, so they were tan. The upper-class stayed inside. Now, the poor are at their computers and the rich are in the Caribbean.”

Melanoma is, of course, only one condition Sears, who is a clinical as opposed to a cosmetic dermatologist, treats. Dermatologists were some of the first doctors to diagnose AIDS because often the first outward symptoms are unexplained skin conditions.

She also sees her share of acne, warts, and psoriasis. All of which sound, well, icky. Sears finds it all fascinating.

Dermatology is like matching wallpaper, says Sears, who began her college career as an art major. “It’s really visual,” she says, “You don’t have to

wail for x-rays and lab tests. You see people with rashes or spots on the outside. It’s really pattern recognition. There’s your spot, and there’s this spot on page 36 of the book.”

Trust heron the sunscreen.-DM.

DR. JUDSON P. SMITH

Ophthalmology

His uncle, grandfather, and aunt were all blind.

IF THINGS HAD GONE THE WAY HE WANTED, JUDSON SMITH would be a cardiologist today. When he was in medical school, cardiology was the specialty of choice. So Smith, like most of his classmates, tried to sign up for a third-year elective on the subject. But because his last name fell in the last half of the alphabet, he missed his chance: The class filled up before he could register.

Smith didn’t get his second or third choice, either, “The only thing left was ophthalmology, ’he says. “I thought, ’This is the worst thing that ever happened to me.’ ” At first he was “profoundly depressed,” but after a while he realized he”d be doing much more than watching patients read eye charts. “I said, ’Wait a second-ophthalmology is really interesting; refractive technologies make people see, you get to do surgical procedures. It became much more complex and vast than 1 thought it was.” And Smith’s family ties gave him another reason to continue with the specialty: His uncle, grandfather, and aunt were all blind in one or both eyes.

Now. at his private practice in Fort Worth’s medical district. Smith practices what he calls “comprehensive ophthalmology”-he looks at the whole eye and tries to determine the effects of a variety of afflictions, from pulmonary disease to diabetes. His primary “focus is geriatric ophthalmology- “that’s basically where the big problems are,” he says-which means devoting much of his time to treating glaucoma, cataracts, and maculai’ degeneration. A recently built optical shop within Smith’s office space allows patients to fill their glasses prescriptions without having to go to another location, a bonus for elderly patients who have trouble getting around.

Smith says it’s often the patterns with those diseases who make his job the most satisfying. “People come in who have one good eye, undergo successful cataract surgery, and see clearly again,” he says. “Those are probably the most grateful patients I can think of.”

Smith has earned the support of Fort Worth’s First Family: A research grant from the Basses is allowing him to study degenerative defects of the eye. He also works with Fort Worth-based Alcon Laboratories as a consultant. With Alcon, he’s helped develop a variety of medications, including anti-infective eye drops, and is currently helping develop anti-cataract drops and drugs for ocular inflammatory diseases.



“Ophthalmology is kind of a happy specialty,” he says. “People walk out with a new pair of glas ses, and they can see better. They’re happy we’ve done something to prolong their visual lifestyle.”–J.W.

THE BEST DOCTORS IN DALLAS-FORT WORTH



ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (GENERAL) Nancy Finnerty ? Medical City Dallas Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital of Plano ? Allergy and Asthma Associates- 972-566-7576

Elliot Ginchansky ? Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. Columbia Medical Center of Piano, Medical City Dallas Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas, Presbyterian Hospital of Piano ? Allergy and Asthma Associates ? 972-566-7576

Gary Neil Grass ? Baylor University Medical Center, Parkland Health and Hospital System. Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ? Dallas Allergy and Asthma Cerner-2I4-691-1330 Rebecca Sue Gruchalla ? University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center ? University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center Department of Allergy ? 214-648-3588

Donald A. Kennedy ? Baylor University Medical Center, Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Parkland Health and Hospital System, Zale Lipshy University Hospital ? Baylor University Medical Center. Baylor Asthma Center ? 972-681 -3920 William Raymond Lumry ? Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ?Allergy and Asthma Research ? 214-365-0365 Robert Jean Rogers*Cook Children’s Medical Center* Fort Worth Allergy and Asthma Associates ’817-315-2550 Michael E. Ruff* Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ? Dallas Allergy and Asthma Center-214-691-1330 Normand Francis Tremblay ? Cook Children’s Medical Center ? Fort Worth Allergy and Asthma Associates ? 817-315-2550

Richard I.. Washerman ? Baylor University Medical Center, Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. Medical City Dallas Hospital ? 972-566-7788 Susan Rudd Wynn ? All Saints Episcopal Hospital-City view. All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Fort Worth, Cook Children’s Medical Center. Harris Methodist-Fort Worth, Harris Methodist-Southwest ? Fort Worth Allergy and Asthma Associates ? 817-315-2550

DERMTOLGY (GENERAL) Phillip James Eichhorn ? St Paul Medical Center, VA Medical Center ? 214-630-9331

Rebecca Euwer ? Parkland Health and Hospital System, RHD Memorial Medical Center, University of Texas-South western Medical Center ? Dermatology Consultants ? 972-243-4530

Donald F. Fincher ? College Station Medical Center, Texoma Medical Center, Wilson N. Jones Regional Health System ? Texoma Dermatology Clinic ?903-892-2126 Philip W. Giles ? Harris Methodist-Fort Worth- 817-335-6155 C. Leroy Goodman ? Harris Methodist-Fort Worth? 817-3354549 James H. Herndon, Jr. ? Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ? Dermatology Center of Dallas ? 214-739-5821 Peter D, Hino ? Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ? Dermatology Center of Dallas ‧ 214.739-5821

Karen R. Houpt ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Parkland Health and Hospital System, St Paul Medical Center, University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center, Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center. Department of Dermatology -214-648-2203

Mark D. Krone ‧ Community Medical Center of Sherman, Texoma Medical Center, Wilson N. Jones Regional Health System ‧ Texoma Dermatology Clinic 903-892-2126

Carolyn B. Lyde ‧ Columbia Medical Center of Lewisville ‧ Columbia Medical Center, Department of Dermatology ‧ 972-436-0358

James Douglas Maberry ‧ Harris Methodist-Fort Worth ‧ Dermatology Associates ‧ 817-336-8131

Michael Maris ‧ RHD Memorial Medical Center ‧ Dermatology Consultants-972-243-4530

Douglas Scott Miller ‧ Harris Methodist-Fort Worth ‧ 817-927-2332

Dennis E. Newton ‧ Parkland Health and Hospital System, RHD Memorial Medical Center ‧ 972-243-4530

Amit G. Pandya ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Parkland Health and Hospital System. University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center, Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center. Department of Dermatology ‧ 214-648-2203

Gene Patrick Ream ‧ Harris Methndisl-HEB-817-571-5879

Robin A. Roberts ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Fort Worth, Cook Children’s Medical Center, Harris Methodist-Fort Worth’ 817-336-3376

Laura L. Sears ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ Dallas Associated Dermatologists. 214-824-2087

Jerald L, Sklar ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ Dallas Associated Dermatologists ’214-824-2087

Roy E, Spencer ‧ Texoma Medical Center, Wilson N. Jones Regional Health System ‧ Texoma Dermatology Clinic ’903-892-2126

Lori D. Stetler ‧ Medical City Dallas Hospital, Parkland Health and Hospital System. Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ 972-566-8855

Danny R. Thomas ‧ 817-335-3487

FAMILY MEDICINE

Geoffrey Barst ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Cityview, All Saints Episcopal

Hospital-fort Worth. Cook Children’s

Medical Center. Harris Methodist-Fort Worth, Harris Methodist-Southwest, Plaza Medical Center of Fort Worth ‧ 817-281-3627

Barbara Ann Birdwell ‧ Harris Methodist-Fort Worth ‧ 817-370-0400

Carl Edward Couth ‧ Baylor Medical Center-Garland ‧ Family Medical Center’972-272-6561

Seth Bailey Cowan ‧ Baylor Medical Center-Garland ‧ Family Health Care Associates ‧ 972-864-0252

Mark R. Dambro ‧ Harris Methodist -Fort Worth’ 817-877-4411

Michael Steven de Larios ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-720-0264

Richard Leon Grandjean ‧ Baylor University Medical Center. Doctors Hospital of Dallas ‧ 214-327-3333

Perry E. Gross ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-823-2166

Robert H. Lilli ‧ Harris Methodist-Southwest ‧ Texas Health Care ‧ 817-346-5111

William S. Lorimer III ‧ Ail Saints Episcopal Hospital-Fort Worth. Harris Methodist-Fort Worth ‧ Texas Health Care ‧817-294-2531

JamesA. Murphy All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Fort Worth-All Saints Medical Consultants-817-335-8479

Kevin Charles Oeffinger ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. Parkland Health and Hospital System. University of Tex as-Southwestern Medical Center. Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ University of Tex as-South western Medical Center, Aston Family Medicine Clinic-214-648-7840 Shelley Roaten, Jr. ‧ Parkland Health and Hospital System. St. Paul Medical Center, University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center. Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center. Aston Family Medicine Clinic ‧ 214-648-7840

Theodore T. Teel, Jr. ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-381-1187

GERIATRIC MEDICINE

Rendra L. Jensen Belfi ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Fort Worth. Harris Methodist – Fort Worth. Plaza Medical Center of Fort Worth ‧ Fort Worth Clinic ‧ 817-336-7191

Craig Douglas Rubin ‧ Parkland Health and Hospital System, St. Paul Medical Center. University of Texas- Southwestern Medical Center. Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine ‧ 214-648-9012

INTERNAL MEDICINE (GENERAL)

William Mark Armstrong ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-828- 5020

Teresa W. Boydston ‧ Harris Merthodist-Fort Worth ‧ Medical Clinic of North Texas 817-334-1400

John Wayne Burnside ‧ Parkland Health and Hospital System, University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center. Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ University of Texas-South western Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine ‧ 214-648-2097

Charles Anthony Carlton ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Fort Worth. Harris Methodist-Fort Worth ‧ Texas Health Care 817-926-2561

James Steven Childers ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Cityview, Harris Methodist-Fort Worth “‧ Fort Worth dime 817-336-7191

Michael Chiu ‧ Baylor/Irving Healthcare System, Columbia Medical Center of Las Colinas, St. Paul Medical Centers 972-556-1128

Robert Reed Click, Jr. ‧ University of Texas-Southwestem Medical Center ‧ University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center. Department of Internal Medicine‧ 214-648-3100

Leonard J. Comess ‧ Doctors Hospital of Dallas ‧ 214-321-6485

Jennifer A. Cuthbert ‧ University of Tex as-South we stem Medical Center ‧ University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Hepatology ‧ 214-648-3440

M. Scott Daniel ‧ Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ North Texas Internist ‧ 214-368-6424

N. Alan Davenport ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Foil Worth. Harris Methodist-Fort Worth ‧817-926-2571

James E. Davidson ‧ Medical Clinic of North Texas -817-334-1400

Craig Em Dearden ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Fort Worth. Harris Mcthodist-Fort Worth -817-332-3039

Stephen Eppstein ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Cityview, Harris Methodist-Fort Worth ‧ Medical Clinic of North Texas ‧ 817-334-1400

Curtis R. Evans ‧ Texas Health Care ‧ 817-346-5488

Robert Lee Fine ‧ Baylor University Medical Center -214-828-5070

Philip Goodman ‧ Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ Cardiology and Internal Medicine A ssociates ‧ 214-369-3613

Robert Joseph Haddox ‧ Doctors Hospital of Dallas -214-321-6485

Cathy A. Hurley ‧ Fort Worth Clinic ‧ 817-336-7191

Richard Coleman Johnston ‧ Baylor/Irving Healthcare System, St. Paul Medical Center. Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ 972-556-1616

Allen Maulsby Jones ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-828-5060

R. Ellwood Jones ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-828-5060

Lyle Kaliser ‧ Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas-214-369-8101

Arnold H. Kassanoff ‧ Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ Cardiology and Internal Medicine Associates ‧ 214-369-3613

Lynne M. Kirk ‧ Parkland Health and Hospital System, St. Paul Medical Center, University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center, Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center ‧214-648-3433

Paul Ewing Madeley ‧ Baylor Center for Restorative Care. Bay lor institute for Rehabilitation, Baylor University Medical Center – 214-828-5030

Russell Lionel Martin, Jr. ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-828-5060

Paul Muncy ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-828-5020

Edward R. Nelson, Jr. ‧ Ail Saints Episcopal Hospital-Cityview, Harris Methodist-Fort Worth ‧ Medical Clinic of North Texas ‧ 817-334-1400

Paul Arnold Neubach ‧ Baylor University Medical Center- 214-828-5010

Stuart Frederick Owen ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-827- 7600

James Fulton Parker ‧ Texas Health Care* 817-346-5488

Richard K. Penny ‧ Medical Clinic of North Texas ‧817-346-5960

Jeffrey Phillips ‧ Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ Texas Intentai Medicine Associates-214-368-7787

Murray Pizette ‧ Doctors Hospital of Dallas ‧ 214-321-6485

Irving David Prengler ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ Texas Primary Care Associates ‧ 214-821-1II7

James C. Readinger ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-City view, Harris Methodist-Southwest ‧ Medical Clinic of North Texas ‧ 817-346-5960

W. Gary Reed ‧ Parkland Health and Hospital System. University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center, Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ University of Texas-Southwestem Medical Center ‧ 214-648-2992

Albert Dee Roberts, Jr. ‧ Parkland Health and Hospital System, University of Texas-Southwestem Medical Center. Zale Lipshy University Hospital ‧ University of Texas-South we stem Medical Center ‧ 214-648-8897

Joseph Martin Rothstein ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-827-7600

Brian Culwell Rutledge ‧ Ail Saints Episcopal Hospital – Fori Worth ‧ 817-926-7991

Walter Nathaniel Skinner ‧ Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ 214-363-6217

Neal Lawrence Sklaver ‧ Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ Medical Specialists Associated-214-692-8541

Randlow Smith, Jr. ‧ 214-828-5070

Paul Arthur Tobolowsky ‧ Medical City Dallas Hospital ‧ Dallas Diagnostic Association-972-991-6000

Martin Earl True. Jr. ‧ Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas- 214-369-8101 Paul Douglas Wade ‧ St. Paul Medical Center -2 14-630-6222

Kenneth L. Walgren ‧ St. Paul Medical Center. 214-630-7866

Robert L. Ward ‧ Medical Clinic of North Texas ‧ 817-346-5960

Richard D. Wilson ‧ Harris Methodist-Southwest ‧ Medical Clinic of North Texas-817-341-8787 F.

David Winter, Jr. ‧ Baylor University Medical Center, Parkland Health and Hospital System -214-828-5010

Kathleen Rae Zeller ‧ Medical City Dallas Hospital. Parkland Health and Hospital System ‧ Dallas Diagnostic Association ‧ 972-991-6000



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (GENERAL)

Theodore E. Fogwell ‧ Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ 214-750-0980

Robert Tau Gunby, Jr. ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-821-9938

D. Alan Johns ‧ Harris Methodist – Fort Worth. Plaza Medical Center of For! Worth ‧ Texas Health Care ‧ 817-284-1152

Darius Roderick Maggi ‧ 903-453-5416

William Kemp Strother III ‧ Baylor University Medical Center ‧ 214-824-2563

OPHTHALMOLOGY (GENERAL)

William Larkin Berry ● Baylor University Méditai Center ● Texas Eye Care Associates ● 214-826-8201

Donald P. Brotherman ● Texas Eye Care ● 214-328-3597

John Edward Eisenlohr ● Mary Shiels Hospital ● 214-521-5620

Grant Gilliland ● Baylor University Medical Center. Columbia Medical Center of Las Colinas. Presbyterian Hospital of Piano- 214-522-7733

David W. Meltzer ● HealthSouth Surgical Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas- 214-368-2020

Craig D. Smith ● Medical City Dallas Hospital ● 972-233-6237

Judson Paul -Smith III ● Piaza Medical Center of Fort Worth- 817-338-1081

Robert Mayo Tenery, Jr. ● Medical City Dallas Hospital ● Eye Associates ● 972-233-3488

Frank Terrell ● Harris Methodist-HEB ● 254-968-6051

PEDIATRICS (GENERAL)

Carolyn Dickson Ashworth ● Columbia Medical Center of Piano ● Pediatric Associates of North Texas ● 972-867-6880

Albert L. Blakes ● 817-571-6633

Michael Edwin Brown ● Baylor University Medical Center, Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. Medical City Dallas Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas, Presbyterian Hospital of Piano, St. Paul Medical Center ● Pediatric Associates of Dallas ● 214-369-7661

Debra Lou Burns ● Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas -214-750-8496

Steven Davis Crow ● 972-952-0280

John Howard Dalton ● Cook Children’s Medical Center, Harris Methodist-Fort Worth -Cook Children’s Northeast Clinic ● 817-514-0346

Phyllis Ann Davis ● Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. Columbia Medical Center of Piano. Presbyterian Hospital of Piano- 972-608-8380

Duane L. Dowell ● 214-951-8669

Molly Droge ● Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. Medical City Dallas Hospital -972-628-6400

Ross Leland F ink elman ● Baylor University Medical Center. Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Medical City Dallas Hospital. Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas, Presbyterian Hospital of Piano. St. Paul Medical Center ● Pediatric Associates of Dallas ● 214-369-7661

John Foster ● Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Medical City Dallas Hospital. Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas, Presbyterian Hospital of Piano, St. Paul Medical Center – Pediatric Associates of Dallas ● 214-369-7661

Charles Morris Ginsburg ● Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Parkland Health and Hospital System, University of Texas-South western Medical Center ● University of Tex as-South we s te m Medical Center. Department of Pediatrics- 214-648-3563

Jules Greif ● Children’s Medical Center of Dallas- 214-590-4340

Walter Halpenny ● Cook Children’s Medical Center ● Health Partners Pediatrics-817-335-1104

Joseph Arthur Hanig ‧ Baylor University Medical Center, Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. Medical City Dallas Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ Clinical Pediatric Associates ‧ 214-368-3659

James Patrick Hieber ‧ Baylor University Medical Center. Children’s Medical Center of Dallas. Medical City Dallas Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas – Clinical Pediatric Associates ‧ 214-368-3659

Susan Jeanne Hubbard ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas ‧ Pediatric .Associates of Dallas ‧ 214-369-7661

Albert Gerard Karam ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Medical City Dallas Hospital. Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas -972-952-0280

James E. Louis ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hosptial-Fort Worth. Cook Children’s Medical Center. Marris Methodist-Fort Worth-817-336-2757

Marsha A. Martinez ‧ 214-590-1080

Hugh Leslie Moore II ‧ Baylor University Medical Center, Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Medical City Dallas Hospital, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ Clinical Pediatric Associates ‧ 214-368-3659

Gary C. Morchower ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Medical City Dallas Hospital. Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas- 972-231-2551

Daniel Dean Nale ‧ Baylor Medical Center-Garland, Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Doctors Hospital of Dallas, Medical City Dallas Hospital. Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas ‧ 214-343-9696

Joseph Paul Peterman‧ Preston Centre Pediatrics ‧ 214-987-0777 John Richard Porter ‧ Baylor-Richardson Medical Center ‧ 972-235-6911

Claude Brockman Prestidge ‧ Baylor University Medical Center, Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Medical City Dallas Hospital, Parkland Health and Hospital System, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas. St, Paul Medical Center ‧ Pediatric Associa tes of Dallas ‧ 214-369-7661

Sharon Rae-817-571-6633

Wilfred Leroy Raine ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas ‧ Metro Medical .Associates ‧ 972-296-6666

Ray N. Rhodes, Jr. ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Cityview, All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Fort Worth. Cook Children’s Medical Center, Harris Methodist-Fort Worth, Harris Methodist-Southwest. Plaza Medical Center of Fort Worth ‧ Health Partners Pediatrics-817-335-1104

John M. Richardson ‧ Cook Children’s Medical Center ‧ 817-336-4896

Tom Rogers, Jr. ‧ All Saints Episcopal Hospital-Fort Worth, Cook Children’s Medical Center, Harris Methodist-Fort Worth, Plaza Medical Center of Fort Worth ‧ Cook Children’s Primary Care Services-817-336-3800

Janet E. Squires ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Parkland Health and Hospital System ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas ‧ 214-640-2329

Joel B. Steinberg ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center ‧ Children’s Medical Center of Dallas ‧ 214-640-2730

PSYCHIATRY (GENERAL)

William Robert Beavers ? 214-528-4718

John R. Debus? 214-373-9605

Paul C. Mohl ? University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center. Zale Lipshy University Hospital ? University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry ? 214-648- 2217

Sue Moss? Psychiatric Associates of the Southwest -972-709-1961

John H. Reitmann ? 214-521-9660

Stephen Scherffius ? 214-373-7442

Kathryn A. Sommerfelt ? 972-387-4752

Leonora Stephens ? 214-522-5120

William Laurence Thornton ? Parkland Health and Hospital System, University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center, Zale Lipshy University Hospital ? University of Texas-South we stem Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry-214-590-3441

Larry Edward Tripp ? Baylor University Medical Center ? 214-824-2273

David L. Tyler ? Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas-214-369-5797

Mark Paul Unterberg ? Timberlawn Mental Health System ? 214-373-8990 Nishendu M. Vasavada ? Columbia Medical Center of Lewisville ? Lakeside LifeCenter? 972-221-174l

Kimberly A. Yonkers ? Parkland Health and Hospital System, University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center. Zale Lipshy University Hospital ? University of Texas-South western Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry ? 214-648-4283

WHERE WE GOT THIS LIST

These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America? database, which includes approximately 30,.000 doctors in more than 40 medical specialties. The Best Doctors in America database is complied and maintained by Woodward/White Inc., of Aiken, South Carolina. For a fee. Best Doctors Inc. will undertake specialized searches for doctors using the Woodward/White database. For more information, contact Best Doctors by phone (888-DOC-TORSi. by mail ’(1359 Silver Bluff Road, Suite F2, Aiken, SC 29803), by e-mail ([email protected] ), or at www.bestdoctors.com.

Woodward/White inc. has used ils best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant thai the information contained herein is complète or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause.

Copyright 1999 by Woodward/White. Aiken, SC. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without permission of Woodward/White Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission.

Face it: Choosing a doctor is one of the hardest things you can attempt. Should you pick that pediatrician because your best friend’s sister’s cousin just loves him? Or is it just as effective to close your eyes and randomly pick a name from your HMO-sanctioned list?

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