LETTERS BitingBack

Readers give our February issue mixed reviews.

Baby Doe’s Dump

THANK YOU FOR EXPOSING BABY DOE’S “land mine” for the dump that it is [“101 Dining Secrets”]. The first (and last) time I had the misfortune of eating there, I took a friend who was visiting from Manhattan and we spent $50 on the worst meal I’ve ever had. Not to mention the humiliation of unwittingly taking someone who has dined at some of the finest restaurants around the world to the worst restaurant in Dallas. I only wish you would have mentioned the vat of grape Kool-Aid they offer as “grape juice.”

TRACI THRASHER

via e-mail



Defending American

WE ARE ABSOLUTELY AMAZED THAT YOU should choose to attack American Airlines. Unlike the other carriers you mention in your article [While We’re At It], American Airlines is the only scheduled airline operating out of the DFW Airport that calls Dallas-Fort Worth home. In fact, AMR and its subsidiaries represent the third-largest employer in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

With a 61 percent market share, American is hardly a monopoly at DFW. American shares each of its domestic hubs with the hub of other major airlines, including Delta’s major market presence at DFW.

Many of your readers are loyal customers of American Airlines or are employees of AMR. Consider where your special interests lie before you attack a community servant or many of your readers may choose to read another”Dallas” magazine. Oops, there isn’t another one.

JOHN AND ANNE VISSER

DALLAS



WE FIND IT STRANGE THAT YOU AND OTH-ers use the word “monopoly” when talking about American Airlines at DFW Airport. Webster defines “monopoly” as “exclusive ownership through legal privilege, command of supply, or concerted action.” Why not talk about Southwest’s 100 percent market share at Love Field? At DFW, American competes with more than 20 airlines. The fact that we hold a 70 percent market share (with our American Eagle partner) is the result of our putting more resources into this market than other airlines have chosen to do and working hard to please our customers.

CHRIS CHIAMES

Managing Director, Public Relations

American Airlines



Preschool Lessons

I APPRECIATED YOUR FEATURE “A PRE-school Sampler.” It gave a good overview of many fine local preschools.

One category that seemed to be missing, however, was that of schools dealing with children at risk for learning disabilities (LD) or differences. Even at the preschool age, there are identifiable signs that may point to a language difference, such as dyslexia, or to Attention Deficit Disorder. Not many schools, however, offer LD programs that address these needs at the preschool level. Those that do include ours (Shelton School), Oak Hill Academy, and Callier Center.

ANNE WAGNER

Director of Public Relations

Shelton School and Evaluation Center



ALTHOUGH I ENJOYED YOUR PRESCHOOL article, I was baffled by this quote about The Learning Tree: “The school is totally geared for the children, not to make the parents comfortable.” My comfort with The Learning Tree is so high that I drive 30 minutes from my home so my son can attend. Why? In his three years at The Learning Tree, I have watched him create African food and crafts and act out traditional Russian folk tales. I have listened to him recite new words in Spanish and Russian and Japanese. Does my son think of these activities as “learning experiences?” No, he thinks he’s having fun. But all of this fun is teaching him to see and value the differences in people-a lesson that makes this Learning Tree parent feel entirely comfortable.

KIMBERLY INGRAM

GARLAND



Laura Miller Unmasked

SO, LAURA MILLER HAS DECIDED TO JOIN the ranks of the very people she exploits [Note from the Publisher, “My Favorite Politician”]. I wonder what,exactly, Miller believes qualifies her for a position on the city council?

This pursuit is quite ironic for a tabloid journalist who has contributed about as much to the betterment of our society as Jerry Springer. Miller has a long history of attacking, with a vengeance, any person(s) with a vision for improving our city, especially if they happen to be independently wealthy or hold an elected office. So why does she never mention her own wealthy upbringing and marriage to, of all things, a politician? 1 guess she doubted Mr, Allison or anyone else would ever find out. Why check the facts?

Perhaps she might want to focus her investigative energy on working through some of these psychological “denial” problems and save the city council job for someone who truly has the city’s best interest in mind.

ASHLEE HUNT KLEINERT

via e-mail

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