YOUR FAMILY’S GUIDE TO The Best Doctors IN DALLAS

IT’S A SIMPLE QUESTION: “IF A CLOSE FRIEND OR RELATIVE CAME to you with a problem within your specialty of medicine, and for whatever reason you could not handle the case, to whom outside of your own institution would you refer them?”

That’s what hundreds of Dallas-area physicians were asked in recent months by the people who compile an invaluable resource work called The Best Doctors in America. Asking that question and many others produced the following list of almost 300 excellent physicians who specialize in combatting the top 10 causes of death: heart disease, stroke, cancer, and the rest. To that we’ve added profiles of 10 great specialists and a look at a unique organization called Dallas Medical Resource, which markets Dallas-area medical expertise to large companies around the country. All this talent helps to explain why Dallas is ranked among the top five cities in America for quality of medical care-and moving up fast.

HEART DISEASE

ANESTHESIOLOGY

Robert). Parks, Jr., general anesthesiology (cardiovascular, transplantation, neuroanesthesia); Baylor University Medical Center; office: 3600 Gaston Ave., Suite 654, Dallas. 75246-1908; 824-2851

Michael A, Ramsay, general anesthesiology (cardiovascular, neonatal, transplantation); Baylor University Medical Center. Department of Anesthesiology; 820-3296

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

L. David Hillis, cardiac catheterization; Parkland Memorial Hospital, Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Internal Medicine, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9047; 590-8879

Vernon P.H. Horn, general cardiovascular disease; St. Paul Medical Center; Texas Cardiology, 5939 Harry Hines Blvd., Suite 630, Dallas, 75235; 879-6450

John Walton Hyland, general cardiovascular disease: Baylor University Medical Center; The Heart Place. 411 N. Washington St., Suite 2200. Dallas, 75246; 841-2000

Stephen Bryce Johnston, general cardiovascular disease (cardiac catheterization, pacemakers); Baylor University Medical Center; Texas Cardiology Consultants, 712 N. Washington St., Suite 300. Dallas. TX 75246; 824-8721

Craig Riggs Malloy, magnetic resonance imaging (general cardiovascular disease, heart failure); VA Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Radiology, 5801 Forest Park Rd., Dallas, 75235-9085; 648-5886

Ronald Michael Peshock, magnetic resonance imaging; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Mary Nell and Ralph B. Rogers Magnetic Resonance Center, 5801 Forest Park Rd., Dallas, 75235; 648-5800

C. Venkata S. Ram, general cardiovascular disease (hypertension); St. Paul Medical Center; Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Internal Medicine, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-8899: 648-3111

James H. Shelton. general cardiovascular disease {cardiac catheterization, nuclear cardiology, angioplasty); Baylor University Medical Center. 3600 Gaston Ave., Suite 851: Dallas, 75246; 826-6044

R. Barrett Steelman, general cardiovascular disease (coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease in the adult); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; North Texas Heart Center, 8230 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 220, Dallas, 75231; 361-3300

Christopher R.C. Wyndham, electrophysiology; Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; Medical City Dallas Hospital; Medical Center of Piano; Presbyterian Hospital of Piano; North Texas Heart Center, 8230 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 220, Dallas, 75231; 361-3300

NEPHROLOGY

Pedro J. Vergne-Marini, Kidney transplantation (pancreas transplantation, heart transplantation, general nephrology, dialysis, glomerular disease): Methodist Medical Center; Dallas Nephrology Associates. 6010 Forest Park Rd., Suite 100, Dallas. 75235; 358-2300

NUCLEAR MEDICINE

Robert W. Parkey, general nuclear medicine (nuclear cardiology, nuclear radiology); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Children’s Medical Center of Dallas; St. Paul Medical Center; Baylor University Medical Center; VA Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Radiology. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-8896; 648-8016

PATHOLOGY

Joseph H. Keffer, (clinical pathology, thyroid function, myocardial markers of injury, laboratory utilization and point-of-care testing); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas 75235-9072; 648. 7887

PEDIATRICS

Sarah Blumenschein, pediatric cardiology (preventive cardiology in children, hypercholesterolemia in children and their families, congenital heart disease); Children’s Medical Center; 640-2333

David E. Fixler. pediatric cardiology; Children’s Medical Center, Department of Cardiology; 640-2333

Lynn Mahony. pediatric cardiology (Marfan’s syndrome, congenital heart disease, cardiovascular evaluation of student athletes); Children’s Medical Center. Department of Cardiology; 640-2333

Edgar A. Newfeld, pediatric cardiology (congenital heart disease, acquired heart disease in children); office; 8230 Walnut Hill Lane, Suite 800. Dallas, 75231; 363-0000

Charles Richard Rosenfeld, neonatal-perinatal medicine (diagnosis of neonatal infection-neutrophil values, cardiovascular adaptation in fetus and newborn, mechanisms maintaining uteroplacental and umbilical blood flows); Parkland Memorial Hospital: Children’s Medical Center; St. Paul Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-9063; 648-3903

Kathleen Rotondo, pediatric cardiology; Children’s Medical Center. Department of Cardiology; 640-2333

William Scott, pediatric cardiology (arrhythmias, syncope, pacemakers): Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Pediatrics, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235; 640-2333

Ellen Weinstein. pediatric cardiology (echocardiography); Children’s Medical Center, Department of Cardiology: 640-2333

Thomas Michael Zellers pediatric cardiology; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Pediatrics, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235; 640-2333

THORACIC SURGERY

Peter A. Alivizatos. transplantation (heart and lung); Baylor University Medical Center, Barnett Tower, Suite 404. 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas, 75246; 824-6718

Robert F. Hebeler, Jr., adult cardiothoracic surgery; Baylor University Medical Center; office, 3409 Worth St., Suite 720, Dallas. 75246-2091; 821-3603

Albert Carl Henry III, adult cardiothoracic surgery; Baylor University Medical Center; office; 3409 Worth Street, Suite 720, Dallas, 75246; 821-3603

Steven Roy Leonard, pediatric cardiac surgery; office: 2730 N. Stemmons Fwy., Suite 104. Dallas. 75235; 631-2557

Melvin Ray Piatt, general thoracic surgery (coronary artery bypass surgery, mitral valve repair, adult cardiothoracic surgery, thoracic oncological surgery); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates of North Texas, 8230 Walnut Hill Ln. Suite 208. Dallas, 75231-8230; 692-6135

Maruf A. Razzuk, adult cardiothoracic surgery (thoracic outlet disorders); Baylor University Medical Center. Wadley Tower. Suite 561, 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas. 75246-1905; 823-7795

William Steves Ring, transplantation (adult cardiothoracic surgery, pediatric cardiac surgery, adult and pediatric heart and lung transplantation, general thoracic surgery): Zale Lipshy University Hospital: St. Paul Medical Center; Children’s Medical Center; Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-8879; 648-3568

Richard E. Wood, general thoracic surgery (cardiovascular surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, heart and lung transplant surgery, pacemakers, gastrointestinal cancer, thoracic oncological surgery); Baylor University Medical Center, Barnett Tower, Suite 404. 3600 Gaston Ave.. Dallas, 75246-1804; 827-3890



CANCER

COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY

R.D. Dignan. general colon and rectal surgery (constipation, colon and rectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease): Baylor University Medical Center, Suite 1209. 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas. 75246-1802; 824-2573

Philip J. Huber, Jr., general colon and rectal surgery, colon and rectal cancer; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital: The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of General Surgery, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9031: 648-3749

Robert Morris Jacobson, general colon and rectal surgery (colitis, inflammatory Dowel disease, colon cancer, constipation): Baylor University Medical Center; Medical City Dallas Hospital; Doctors Hospital of Dallas; Mary Shiels Hospital; North Texas Colon and Rectal, 3409 Worth Street, Suite 500. Dallas. 75246; 824-1730

Warren E. Lichliter, general colon and rectal surgery (oncology); Baylor University Medical Center; North Texas Colon and Rectal. 3409 Worth Street, Suite 500, Dallas, 75246; 823-2107

Floyd Clark Odom. general colon and rectal surgery (colon and rectal cancer, anorectal disease, colonoscopy}; Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; Texas Colon and Rectal Surgeons. 8220 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 205, Dallas, 75231: 739-5758

DERMATOLOGY

Clay J. Cockerel!, dermatopathology (clinical dermatology, cutaneous lymphomas, HIV infection. AIDS, melanoma, clinicopathologic correlation); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Methodist Medical Center; Baylor University Medical Center; Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; St. Paul Medical Center; Freeman-Cockerel I Dermatopathology Laboratories, 2330 Butler St., Suite 115, Dallas, 75235: 638-2222

Donald F. Fincher. clinical dermatology (aging skin, skin cancer surgery); Wilson N. Jones Memorial Hospital: Texoma Medical Center (Denison); Columbia Medical Center (Sherman); Texoma Dermatology Clinic. 3403 Loy Lake Rd., Sherman, 75090; 903-892-2126

Mark D. Koone clinical dermatology (skin cancer, wound healing): Wilson N. Jones Memorial Hospital: Texoma Dermatology Clinic. 3403 Loy Lake Rd.. Sherman, 75090; 903-892-2126

Dennis E. Newton, clinical dermatology (laser surgery, aesthetic surgery, skin cancer surgery and reconstruction, aging skin); RHD Memorial Medical Center; Professional Plaza Three. Suite 304. 10 Medical Pkwy., Dallas, 75234; 243-4530

Amit G. Pandya, clinical dermatology (blistering disorders, pigmentary disorders, cutaneous lymphomas, laser surgery); Zale Lipshy University Hospital: Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Dermatology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-7200; 648-2203

Gene Patrick Ream, clinical dermatology (skin cancer, acne}; Harris Methodist-HEB; Hurst Euless Bedford Professional Place. 1604 Hospital Pkwy., Suite 307. Bedford. 76022; 817-571-5879

Jerald L. Sklar, clinical dermatology (skin cancer surgery and reconstruction, laser surgery); Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Dermatology. Suite 1051, 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas, 75246-1910; 824-2087

Roy E. Spencer, clinical dermatology (skin cancer, acne}; Texoma Medical Center (Denison); Texoma Dermatology Clinic. 3403 Loy Lake Rd., Sherman, 75090; 892-2126

Hein Johan Ter Poorten, clinical dermatology (acne, skin cancer surgery and reconstruction); Parkland Memorial Hospital (Dallas), Baylor Medical Center-Richardson; office, 375 Municipal Dr.. Suite 226, Richardson. 75080; 234-3123

MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND HEMATOLOGY

Robert H. Collins, Jr.. bone marrow transplantation (immunotherapy, cancer bio-therapy, leukemia); Baylor University Medical Center, Collins Building, fifth floor. 3535 Worth St.. Dallas, 75246; 820-2619

Barry Cooper, general medical oncology and hematology (disorders of bleeding, thrombosis, leukemia, lymphomas); Baylor University Medical Center. Collins Building, Suite 200. 3535 Worth St., Dallas. 75246; 820-8347

Eugene Phillip Frenkel, general medical oncology and hematology (malignant lymphomas, breast cancer, prostate cancer); Zale Lipshy University Hospital: Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235; 648-2647

Stephen E. Jones, breast cancer (oncology only); Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, 3535 Worth St., Suite 300, Dallas. 75246-2039; 820-8309

Robert G. Mennel. general medical oncology and hematology; Texas Oncology, 3535 Worth St., Dallas, 75246; 824-4901

John Dorrance Minna, (family cancer genetics); Professor of internal medicine and pharmacology. The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center: Director, Nancy B. and Jake Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research; Zale Lipshy University Hospital: The Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-8593: 648-4900

Douglas Wayne Orr, general medical oncology and hematology; Baylor University Medical Center; Texas Oncology, 3535 Worth St., Suite 230, Dallas. 75246; 820-8672

Steven Paulson, gastrointestinal cancer; Baylor University Medical Center; Texas Oncology. 3535 Worth St., Dallas, 75246: 820-8672

Marvin Jules Stone, myeloma (lymphomas, immunology) Baylor University Medical Center; 820-3445

James F. Strauss, general medical oncology and hematology (disorders of bleeding, thrombosis): Presbyterian Hospital, Suite 320, 8230 Walnut Hill Ln., Dallas, 75231; 739-4175

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY

Derek A. Bruce, pediatric neurological surgery (trauma, head injury, brain tumors, seizures); Medical City Dallas Hospital. Building C, Suite 737. 7777 Forest Ln.. Dallas, 75230-2594; 78&6640

Bruce E. Mickey, epilepsy (tumor surgery): Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-8855; 648-2369

Kenneth N. Shapiro, pediatric neurological surgery (tumor surgery, vascular neurological surgery, craniofacial surgery); Medical City Dallas Hospital; Children’s Medical Center. Department of Neurological Surgery; 640-6660

Frederick H. Sklar, pediatric neurological surgery (pediatric brain and spinal tumors, congenital malformations of the brain and spine, pediatric vascular neurological surgery): Medical City Dallas Hospital: Children’s Medical Center, Center for Pediatric Neurosurgery: 640-6660

Dale Swift, pediatric neurological surgery (spinal surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, trauma, pediatric tumor surgery); Children’s Medical Center: 640-6660

Richard L. Weiner, general neurological surgery (stereotactic radiosurgery, spinal surgery); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; Doctors Hospital of Dallas; Presbyterian Hospital of Piano; Lake Pointe Medical Center (Rowlett): Baylor Medical Center-Garland; Southwest Neurosurgical Associates, 8220 Walnut Hill Ln.. Suite 308. 8220 Walnut Hill Ln.. Dallas. 75231-4413; 363-8524

NEUROLOGY

S. Clifford Schold, Jr., neuro-oncology (brain tumors); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Neurology. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Room F2.318. Dallas. 75235-9036; 648-2564

NEUROLOGY, CHILDREN

Roy D. Elterman. epilepsy (neuro-oncology, infantile spasms); Medical City Dallas Hospital; Dallas Pediatric Neurology Associates, North Central Plaza. Building III. Suite 580, 12801 N. Central Expwy.. Dallas. 75243; 991-2202

Ewell S, Roach, general child neurology (genetic disorders affecting the brain, stroke/vascular disorders in children, brain tumors in children): Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children; Children’s Medical Center. Pediatric Center for Restorative Care; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Neurology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd. .Dallas, 75235-90 36; 640-2751

NUCLEAR MEDICINE

Landis K. Griffeth, general nuclear medicine (oncology, positron emission tomography); Baylor University Medical Center; 820-4057

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY

Carolyn M. Matthews, gynecologic cancer; Baylor University Medical Center; Texas Oncology. 3320 Live Oak St.. Dallas, 75204: 820-8672

C. Allen Stringer, Jr., gynecologic cancer: Baylor University Medical Center; Texas Oncology, 3535 Worth St., second floor, Dallas. 75246; 824-4901

William Kemp Strother III. general obstetrics and gynecology (reproductive surgery, laparoscopic surgery, genital dermatological disease, gynecologic cancer, infectious disease, pediatric and adolescent gynecology): Baylor University Medical Center: office: 1311 N. Washington St., Dallas. 75204; 824-2563

OPHTHALMOLOGY

Rajiv Anand, vitreo-retinal surgery (ocular oncology, retinal diseases, uveitis): Presbyterian Hospital; Medical City Dallas Hospital: Texas Retina Associates, 7150 Greenville Ave., Suite 400. Dallas. 75231; 692-6941

Dwain G. Fuller, ocular oncology (vitreo-retinal surgery, retinal diseases); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas: Texas Retina Associates, 7150 Greenville Ave.,Suite 400. Dallas. 75231; 692-6941

Bruce C. Taylor, vitreo-retinal surgery: Medical Retinal Diseases; office: 2811 Lemmon Ave., East. Suite 402, Dallas, 75204; 521-1153

PATHOLOGY

Raheela Ashfaq. general pathology (fine needle aspiration biopsy, automated gyn-cytology, new technologies in cytology); Parkland Hospital. Department of Cytology; 590-8743

Clay J. Cockerel!, dermatopathology (clinical dermatology, cutaneous lymphomas, HIV infection. AIDS, melanoma, clinicopathologic correlation); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Methodist Medical Center; Baylor University Medical Center; Presbyterian Hospital: St. Paul Medical Center; Freeman-Cockerell Dermatopathology Laboratories, 2330 Butler St., Suite 115. Dallas. 75235-9930: 638-2222

William V, Miller, general pathology (blood banking/transfusion medicine, bone marrow transplantation); BloodCare Dallas, 9000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-1730; 351-8561

PEDIATRICS

George R. Buchanan, pediatric hematology-oncology (pediatric leukemia, sickle cell disease, hemophilia): Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9063: 648-8594

Barton A. Kamen, pediatric hematology-oncology (clinical pharmacology, experimental chemotherapy): Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9063; 648-3896

Perry D. Nisen. pediatric hematology-oncology; Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9063; 648-3896

Eric S. Sandler, pediatric hematology-oncology (pediatric bone marrow transplantation); Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Pediatrics. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-9063; 640-2382

Gall Elizabeth Tomlinson, pediatric hematology-oncology (pediatric oncology (solid tumors], genetic testing for cancer predisposition); Children’s Medical Center: The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Pediatrics, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235; 648-3896

Naomi J. Winick. pediatric hematology-oncology (leukemia, lymphomas, methoUexate/6-mercaptopurine); Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Hematology-Oncology, Sixth Floor Clinic, 1935 Motor St.. Dallas, 75235; 640-2382

PLASTIC SURGERY

Fritz E. Barton, Jr., reconstructive surgery, facial aesthetic surgery (breast reconstruction, augmentation mammoplasty, breast reduction, body contouring, laser surgery); Baylor University Medical Center; Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, 411 M. Washington Ave., Suite 6000. Dallas, 75246; 821-9355

Rod J. Rohrich, reconstructive surgery; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Baylor University Medical Center; Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, 411 N. Washington Ave.. Suite 6000. Dallas, 75246; 821-9114

RADIATION ONCOLOGY

Jerry Lee Barker, general radiation oncology (breast cancer, lung cancer, genitourinary cancer); Presbyterian Hospital, Radiology Oncology Center; 345-7394

Gregory Allen Echt, general radiation oncology; Irving Cancer Center, 2001 N. MacArthur Blvd.. Suite 120, Irving, 75061; 579-4300

Dan Patrick Garwood, breast cancer (brain cancer): Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Radiation Oncology. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9122; 648-2296

Eli Glatstein. lymphomas, sarcomas, lung cancer (sensitizers, Hodgkin’s disease, protectors, photodynamic therapy); Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Radiation Oncology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-8590: 648-7689

Jeffrey Evan Greenberg. general radiation oncology (breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lymphomas); Medical Center of Piano; North Texas Cancer Center. 3705 W. 15th St., Piano, 75075; 867-3577

Louis Lee Munoz, general radiation oncology (pediatric radiation oncology, brain cancer); Medical City Dallas Hospital; St. Paul Medical Center; 879-2696; 661-7031

David A. Pistenmaa, general radiation oncology, genito-urinary cancer; Medical City Dallas Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center; Parkland Memorial Hospital; St. Paul Medical Center; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The Aston Ambulatory Care Center; Medical City Dallas Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology. Building D, Suite 110; 788-5662

David Rosenthal, genera! radiation oncology (head and neck, lung, and gyneco-logic cancer); The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas,

5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235; 648-2296

Robert Pickett Scruggs III, general radiation oncology (breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lymphomas); Baylor University Medical Center; Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 3535 Worth St., Dallas, 75246; 820-3231

Nell Nathan Senzer, general radiation oncology (brachytherapy, head and neck cancer); Baylor University Medical Center; Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology. 3535 Worth St.. Dallas, 75246; 820-3231

Alan A. Slomowitz, general radiation oncology (prostate cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer); Methodist Medical Center; 947-1770

RADIOLOGY

Guido Currarino. pediatric radiology; Children’s Medical Center, Department of Radiology; 640-2305

Norman George Diamond, general radiology (vascular and interventional radiology [peripheral angioplasty, stents, biliary interventions!); Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Radiology; 820-3206

Paul Harris Ellenbogen, general radiology (ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, mammography); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; Southwest Diagnostic Imaging Center, Professional Building Three. 8230 Walnut Hill Ln? Suite 100, Dallas, 75231-4496; 345-6905

Steven E. Harms, magnetic resonance imaging (breast, musculoskeletal, temporomandibular joint); Baylor University Medical Center, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Department; 820-2310

Stephen Paul Lee, general radiology (interventional); Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Radiology; 820-3216

Phillip D. Purdy, neuroradiology (interventional neuroradiology, stroke and cerebrovascular disease, endovascular aneurysm therapy); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Children’s Medical Center; St. Paul Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-8896; 648-3928

Helen Cornelia Redman, general radiology (vascular and interventional radiology, emergency radiology, genitourinary radiology); Parkland Memorial Hospital; 2ale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-8896; 648-8012

Frank J. Rivera, general radiology (interventional); Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Vascular Interventional Radiology; 820-3206

SURGERY

Ronald C. Jones, general surgery (breast surgery, endocrine surgery, gastroenterology surgery); Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Surgery; 820-3250

Zelig H. Lieberman, gastroenterologic surgery {hepatic surgery, biliary surgery, oncologic surgery]; Baylor University Medical Center Plaza, Wadley Tower, Suite 958, 3600 Gaston Ave.. Dallas, 75246; 826-6276

SURGICAL ONCOLOGY

Janet Hale, breast cancer; Medical City Dallas Hospital; Breast Surgeons of North Texas, 7777 Forest Ln., Suite C614, Dallas. 75230; 661-7499

Thelma Hurd. general surgical oncology (colon and rectal cancer, gastrointestinal cancer); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; St. Paul Medical Center: The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-9031; 648-9459

James Frank Huth, general surgical oncology (breast cancer, liver cancer, melanoma [soft tissue sarcomas]); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Dallas County Hospital District; St. Paul Medical Center. VA Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-9031; 648-9460

Ronald C. Jones, breast cancer (general surgical oncology, melanoma]; Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Surgery; 820-3250

Sally Moot Knox, breast cancer; Baylor University Medical Center; office: 3600 Gaston Ave.. Suite 810. Dallas. 75246: 826-9797

Joseph Allen Kuhn,general surgical oncology (breast cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, thyroid cancer); Baylor University Medical Center; office: Sammons Tower, 3409 Worth St.. Suite 420, Dallas, 75246-2039; 824-9963

Ann Marilyn Leitch, breast cancer (general surgical oncology, melanoma); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9031; 648-3039

Zelig H. Lieberman, general surgical oncology; Baylor University Medical Center: Baylor Medical Plaza, Wadley Tower. Suite 958; 826-6276

John C, O’Brien, Jr.. melanoma (head and neck surgery, gastrointestinal cancer); Baylor University Medical Center. Wadley Tower, Suite 958, 3600 Gaston Ave.. Dallas, 75246; 826-6276

George N. Peters, breast cancer (diseases of the breast, breast surgery); Baylor University Medical Center; Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, 3409 Worth St., Suite 300. Dallas, 75246-2039; 821-2962

John T. Preskitt. general surgical oncology (breast surgery, gastrointestinal cancer, head and neck cancer, general surgery); Baylor University Medical Center. Suite 958, 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas. 75246; 826-6276

THORACIC SURGERY

Harold C. Urschel, Jr., general thoracic surgery (thoracic outlet syndrome, lung volume reduction, lung cancer); The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center; Baylor University Medical Center. Barnett Tower, Suite 1201, 3600 Gaston Ave.. Dallas. 75246-1905; 824-2503

UROLOGY

Steven M. Frost, general urology (urologie oncology); Baylor University Medical Center. Barnett Tower. Suite 1205, 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas, 75246-1812; 826-6021

Pat Fox Fulgham, general urology (urologie oncology, laparoscopic surgery, imaging, endourology, impotence); Presbyterian Hospital; Urology Specialists, Presbyterian Professional Building, Suite 208, 8210 Walnut Hill Ln., Dallas, 75231:691-1902

Lon Michael Goldstein, pediatric urology (urologie oncology): Children’s Medical Center; Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; Medical City Dallas Hospital: Baylor University Medical Center, Barnett Tower. Suite 1205. 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas, 75246-1812; 826-6021

John Dowling McConnell, general urology (prostate disease); Zale Lipshy University Hospital: Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Division of Urology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9110; 648-4765

Donald L. McKay, Jr., general urology (female incontinence, impotence, urologie oncology, pediatric urology): Medical City Dallas Hospital: St. Paul Medical Center; Medical City Dallas Hospital, Building A, Suite 230; 661-7765; 879-8541

Arthur I. Sagalowsky, urologie oncology, transplantation: Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9110; 648-3976

Key H. Stage, general urology (urologie oncology, endourology); Baylor University Medical Center. Barnett Tower, Suite 907, 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas. 75246; 826-8844



STROKE

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY

Duke S. Samson, vascular neurological surgery (cerebrovascular surgery); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; VA Medical Center; Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-8855; 648-3529

NEUROLOGY

Ralph G. Greenlee, Jr., strokes (electromyography): Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Neurology. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd..Dallas, 75235-8855; 648-9574

Richard Charles Hinton, general neurology (cerebrovascular disease [stroke]); Presbyterian Hospital. Suite 915, 8210 Walnut Hill Ln., Dallas, 75231-4407; 750-9977

Hal Unwln. (critical care medicine, stroke); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; 648-3256

NEUROLOGY, CHILDREN

Ewell S. Roach, general child neurology (genetic disorders affecting the brain, stroke/vascular disorders in children, brain tumors in children): Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children; Children’s Medical Center of Dallas; Pediatric Center for Restorative Care; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Neurology. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-9036: 640-2751

PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION

Andrew J. Cole, general physical medicine and rehabilitation; Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabiltation. 411 N. Washington Ave., Suite 4000. Dallas, 75246; 820-2521

Wayne R. English, general physical medicine and rehabilitation: Texas Back Institute, 3201 Airport Frwy., Suite 113, Bedford, 76022; 817-267-6683

Phala A niece Helm, general physical medicine and rehabilitation (burns, diabetic feet); Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9055; 648-2288

Karen J. Kowalske. general physical medicine and rehabilitation (trauma and burn rehabilitation, peripheral nerve injuries, stroke, electrodiagnostic medicine); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9055; 648-2288

Peter John Rappa. general physical medicine and rehabilitation; Irving Healthcare System; office: 1906 N. Story Rd.. Irving, 75061; 513-2320

Barry Samuel Smith, general physical medicine and rehabilitation; Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabiltation; 820-7192

Robert Phillips Wilder, general physical medicine and rehabilitation (sports medicine, electrodiagnostic medicine); Baylor University Medical Center; Tom Landry Sports Medicine and Research Center, 411 N. Washington Ave., Suite 4000, Dallas. 75246; 820-2521

SURGERY

Wilson V. Garrett, general vascular surgery (carotid surgery for stroke prevention, treatment of aortic aneurysms, reoperative vascular surgery); Baylor University Medical Center, Doctors Hospital of Dallas, 72 N. Washington Ave.. Suite 509, Dallas. 75246; 824-7280



CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

Gary Nell Gross, general allergy and immunology (asthma, sinus disease); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; Baylor University Medical Center: Dallas Allergy and Asthma Center, 5499 Glen Lakes Dr., Suite 100. Dallas. 75231-4383:691-1330

Michael E. Ruff, general allergy and immunology (asthma, pediatric allergy/asthma); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas: Dallas Allergy Clinic, 5499 Glen Lakes Dr., Suite 100, Dallas, 75231; 691-1330

Richard L. Wasserman, general allergy and immunology (immunodeficiency/recurrent infection, asthma, food allergy); Children’s Medical Center; Medical City Dallas, Suite C-706; 788-8877

PULMONARY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE

Robert D. Black, general pulmonary and critical care medicine (acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary diseases in immunocompromised hosts); Baylor University Medical Center. Division of Pulmonary Medicine; 820-2508

Charles B. Shuey, Jr., general pulmonary and critical care medicine {transplantation); Baylor University Medical Center; 820-2508

Jonathan Charles Weissler. general pulmonary and critical care medicine (pulmonary fibrosis, immunologic lung disease, critical care medicine); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-9034; 648-2534



TRAUMA

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY

Derek A. Bruce, pediatric neurological surgery (trauma, head injury, brain tumors, seizures); Medical City Dallas Hospital, Building C. Suite 737; 788-6640

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

Robert W. Bucholz, trauma (reconstructive hip and knee surgery, biomaterials in orthopedic surgery); Parkland Memorial Hospital: Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Children’s Medical Center; VA Medical Center; Healthsouth Dallas Rehabilitation Institute; Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children; The University of Texas-South western Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 7523&S883; 648-3871

Roby Dan Mize, reconstructive surgery (trauma [severe fractures], pediatric orthopedic surgery, sports medicine/arthroscopy); Presbyterian Hospital; Texas Orthopaedic Associates, 8210 Walnut Hill Ln.. Suite 416. Dallas, 75231; 750-1207

Charles Marshall Reinert trauma (pelvic fractures, acetabular fractures, complex extremity fractures, trauma reconstruction]; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-8883; 648-3871

Timothy G. Schacherer. trauma(upper extremity, hand surgery, soft tissue reconstruction); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-8883; 648-8739

SURGERY

Charles James Carrico, general surgery (surgical critical care, trauma); Parkland Memorial Hospital: Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-9031; 648-3504

John L. Hunt, trauma (surgical critical care, burn surgery); The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Surgery, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9060; 648-2152

Erwin R. Thai, trauma; Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Surgery. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-7200: 648-3531



PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA

PEDIATRICS

Daniel L Levin, pediatric critical care; Children’s Medical Center. Pediatric Intensive Care; 640-2360

PULMONARY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE

Robert D. Black, general pulmonary and critical care medicine [acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary diseases in immunocompromised hosts); Baylor University Medical Center. Division of Pulmonary Medicine; 820-2508

Charles B. Shuey, Jr., general pulmonary and critical care medicine (transplantation); Baylor University Medical Center; 820-2508

Jonathan Charles Weissler, general pulmonary and critical care medicine (pulmonary fibrosis, immunologic lung disease, critical care medicine); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9034; 648-2534



DIABETES

ANESTHESIOLOGY

Paul F. White, ambulatory anesthesia: Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Room CS 2.126. Dallas, TX 75235-8894: 648-6424

ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM

Daniel W. Foster, diabetes; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9060: 648-3486

Philip Raskin, diabetes: Diabetes Clinic; University Diabetes Treatment Center/Parkland Memorial Hospital; VA Medical Center; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Presbyterian Hospital; Medical City Dallas Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-8858:648-2017

Richard A. Sachson. diabetes (general endocrinology and metabolism, neuroendocrine logy, thyroid, osteoporosis); Presbyterian Hospital; Endocrine Associates of Dallas. 5480 La Sierra Dr., Dallas. 75231; 363-5535

NEPHROLOGY

Pedro J. Vergne-Marini, kidney transplantation (pancreas transplantation, heart transplantation, general nephrology, dialysis, glomerular disease): Methodist Medical Center; Dallas Nephrology Associates. 6010 Forest Park Rd., Suite 100. Dallas, 75235; 358-2300

OPHTHALMOLOGY

Bradley F. Jost, medical retinal diseases, vitreo-retinal surgery: Presbyterian Hospital; Baylor University Medical Center: Texas Retina Associates. 7150 Greenville Ave.. Suite 400. Dallas, 75231: 692-6941

Rand (William Bertrand) Spencer, vitreo-retinal surgery (retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy, medical retinal diseases); Presbyterian Hospital; Baylor University Medical Center. Suite 1055, 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas, 75246; 821-4540

Robert Eugene Torti, medical retinal diseases, vitreo-retinal surgery (diabetic retinopathy): Methodist Medical Center of Dallas: RHD Memorial Medical Center: St. Paul Medical Center; office: 1330 N. Beckley Ave.. Suite 103, Dallas. 75203: 620-0270

PEDIATRICS

Steven Roy Alexander, pediatric nephrology (dialysis, kidney transplantation, general clinical pediatric nephrology); Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX 75235-9063; 648-3438; 640-2980

Bryan A. Dickson, pediatric endocrinology (diabetes, growth disorders, disorders of puberty): Children’s Medical Center of Dallas; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-9063; 640-5959

Jose L. Gonzalez, pediatric endocrinology (growth and maturational disorders in children and adolescents): Children’s Medical Center, 6300 Harry Hines Blvd., Suite 1200, Dallas. 75235-7794; 640-5959

James F. Marks, pediatric endocrinology (Type I diabetes mellitus); Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd. Dallas, 7523S9063; 648-3501

Perrin C. White, pediatric endocrinology (diabetes): University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center. Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9060; 648-3501

PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION

Phala Aniece Helm, general physical medicine and rehabilitation (burns, diabetic feet); Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9055; 648-2288



AIDS

ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

Rebecca Sue Gruchalla. general allergy and immunology (antibiotic drug allergy, sulfonamide drug reactions in AIDS patients, pediatric inner city asthma); Parkland Memorial Hospital: Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-8859: 648-3004

Richard L. Wasserman, general allergy and immunology (immunodeficiency/ recurrent infection, asthma, food allergy) Children’s Medical Center; Medical City Dallas, Suite C-706: 788-8877

DERMATOLOGY

Clay J. Cockerell, dermatopathology (clinical dermatology, cutaneous lymphomas, HIV infection, AIDS, melanoma, clinicopathologic correlation); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Methodist Medical Center; Baylor University Medical Center; Presbyterian Hospital; St. Paul Medical Center: Freeman-Cockerell Dermatopathology Laboratories, 2330 Butler St., Suite 115, Dallas. 75235; 638-2222

INFECTIOUS DISEASE

Jack A. Barnett, general infectious disease. Methodist Medical Center; 947-2351

Edward Leo Goodman, general infectious disease (granulomatous infections, hospital-acquired infections, antibiotic utilization); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; office: 8210 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 700. Dallas. 75231; 691-8306

Clark R. Gregg, general infectious disease (hospital-acquired infections, fungus infections); VA Medical Center; Dallas Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 4500 S. Lancaster Rd.. Dallas. 75216-7167; 376-5451

James P. Luby, general infectious disease (infections of the central nervous system, sexually transmitted diseases, clinical virology); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Internal Medicine. Division of Infectious Disease. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9113; 648-3480

Robert S. Munford. general infectious disease (sepsis and septic shock); Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9113; 648-3480

Perry G. Pate, general infectious disease; ID Associates, 5939 Harry Hines Blvd., Suite 545, Dallas. 75235; 879-2387

Jay Philip Sanford, general infectious disease (tropical disease and travel medicine]; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital: Antimicrobial Therapy, 5910 N. Central Expwy., Suite 1955. Dallas. 75206; 750-5783

Steven M. Seidenfeld. general infectious disease: Medical City Dallas Hospital; office: 12200 Park Central Dr., Suite 220. Dallas, 75251; 661-5550 Paul M. Southern, general infectious disease (parasitology, tropical disease and travel medicine); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Pathology. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-9060: 648-3587

William Levin Sutkor, general infectious disease (AIDS, endocarditis); Baylor University Medical Center; North Texas Infectious Diseases Consultants, 3409 Worth St.. Suite 710, Dallas. 75246: 823-2533

PATHOLOGY

Clay J. Cockerell. dermatopathology (clinical dermatology, cutaneous lymphomas. HIV infection. AIDS, melanoma, clinicopathologic correlation); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; Methodist Medical Center; Baylor University Medical Center: Presbyterian Hospital; St. Paul Medical Center; Freeman-Cockerel I Dermatopathology Laboratories. 2330 Butler St.. Suite 115, Dallas, 75235-9930; 638-2222



SUICIDE

PSYCHIATRY

Baer M. Ackerman, child and adolescent psychiatry (general psychiatry, mental retardation/mental health, mood and anxiety disorders); Seay Behavioral Center; Medical Center of Piano; office: 1700 Alma Dr., Suite 480, Piano, 75075; 422-1814

John W. Cain, mood and anxiety disorders (psychoanalysis, psychopharmacolo-gy); Parkland Memorial Hospital: Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Psychiatry, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-8898; 648-3888

Joseph Donald Gaspari. addiction psychiatry, psychoanalysis (mood and anxiety disorders); Charter Behavioral Health System of Dallas (Piano): office: 5956 Sherry Ln., Suite 540, Dallas. 7522&8016; 369-6335

Herbert Leslie Gomberg, psychoanalysis (mood and anxiety disorders, neurotic character disorders): Presbyterian Hospital; office: 8226 Douglas Ave. Suite 430, Dallas. 75225; 691-8606

Jerry M. Lewis III. child and adolescent psychiatry, psychoanalysis (mood and anxiety disorders); Timberlawn Psychiatric Hospital: office: 8226 Douglas Ave.. Suite 805, Dallas, 5225; 373-6194

Edgar P. Nace. addiction psychiatry (forensic psychiatry, general psychiatry, mood and anxiety disorders, psychopharmacology) ; Charter Behavioral Health System of Dallas (Piano). Medical City Dallas Hospital, Suite B-413; 788-6282

Frederick Petty, mood and anxiety disorders (post-traumatic stress disorder, psychopharmacology); VA Medical Center; Dallas Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 4500 S. Lancaster Rd., Dallas. 75216-7191; 376-5451

A. John Rush, mood and anxiety disorders, psychopharmacology: Parkland Memorial Hospital; St. Paul Medical Center; Presbyterian Hospital: Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5959 Harry Hines Blvd., Suite 600, Dallas. 75235: 648-8321

Kathryn A. Sommer felt, general psychiatry (mood and anxiety disorders, women related illnesses); office: 12880 Hillcrest Rd.. Suite 104, Dallas, 75230; 387-4752

Leonora Stephens, general psychiatry (marital and family therapy, psychotherapy from a psychodynamic, family systems perspective, group therapy); office: 3131 Turtle Creek Blvd.. Suite 1120. Dallas, 75219; 522-5120

Rege S. Stewart, mood and anxiety disorders (psychopharmacology); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Psychiatry. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9070; 648-3300

Patricia Suppes, mood and anxiety disorders (bipolar, affective disorders); The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Psychiatry, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-9070; 648-4211

David L. Tyler, general psychiatry (mood disorders, psychopharmacology); Presbyterian Hospital; office: 5445 La Sierra Dr.. Suite 202. Dallas. 75231; 369-5797

Mark Paul Unterberg. general psychiatry (occupational psychiatry, psychoanalysis, sports psychiatry, addiction psychiatry, mood and anxiety disorders, psychopharmacology. medical treatment of drug abusers); Timberlawn Psychiatric Hospital, 4600 Samuel Blvd., Dallas, 75228; 373-8990

Kimberly A. Yonkers. general psychiatry (premenstrual syndrome, postpartum disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, psychopharmacology); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; VA Medical Center; Aston Ambulatory Care Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-9032; 648-4283



LIVER DISEASE

ANESTHESIOLOGY

Frances Connally Morriss, pediatric anesthesiology (pediatric critical care, anesthesia for pediatric liver transplant); Children’s Medical Center of Dallas; 640-2399

GASTROENTEROLOGY

Burton Combes, hepatology (primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune liver disease, liver disease in pregnancy); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-8887; 648-3440

Jeffrey Steven Crippin, hepatology (liver transplantation); Baylor University Medical Center. Liver Service, Three Truett Tower; 820-6896

Daniel Carl DeMarco, general gastroenterology (liver transplantation, endoscopic ultrasonography, small bowel transplantation); Baylor University Medical Center; 820-2232

Markus Goldschmiedt, endoscopy (pancreas, biliary, inflammatory bowel disease, gastrointestinal tumors); Medical Center of Piano; office: 1600 Coit Rd.,Suite 401. Plano, 75075; 867-0019

William M. Lee. hepatology (chronic hepatitis, acute liver failure); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Gastroenterology, Liver Unit, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-8887: 648-3323

Peter Mayer Loeb. endoscopy (hepatoiogy, pancreatic disease, gall bladder and biliary disease); Presbyterian Hospital; Dallas Digestive Disease Associates, 8230 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 408. Dallas, 75231-4403; 345-7398

Willis C. Maddrey. hepatology; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Office of the Executive Vice-President for Clinical Affairs. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-8570; 648-2024

Allen W. Rubin, hepatology (inflammatory bowel disease, endoscopy, esophageal disease, general gastroenterology, pancreatic disease, peptic disorders); St. Paul Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, St. Paul Medical Building. 5939 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-6243; 879-6900

Dwain Louis Thiele. hepatology; Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-8887:648-3440

NEPHROLOGY

Thomas A. Gonwa. kidney transplantation (transplant medicine, liver transplantation, critical care medicine); Baylor University Medical Center, Baylor Transplant Services; Dallas Nephrology Associates. 3601 Swiss Ave., Dallas. 75204; 827-7717

PEDIATRICS

John Milton Andersen, pediatric gastroenterology (esophageal disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease); Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Center for Pediatric Gastroenterology; 640-8000

Robert Jeffrey Zwiener pediatric gastroenterology (pediatric liver disease, pediatric endoscopy, pediatric inflammatory bowel disease); Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Center for Pediatric Gastroenterology; 640-8000

SURGERY

Robert M, Goldstein, transplantation (hepatobiliary surgery, surgical critical care, gastroenterologic surgery, general surgery); Baylor University Medical Center, Transplantation Services; 820-2050

Goran 8. Klintmalm. transplantation (liver, kidney, pancreas, small bowel transplantation, immunosuppression, organ allocation); Children’s Medical Center of Dallas; Baylor University Medical Center. Transplantation Services; 820-2050

Zelig H. Lieberman, gastroenterologic surgery (hepatic surgery, biliary surgery, oncologic surgery); Baylor University Medical Center Plaza, Wadley Tower, Suite 958. 3600 Gaston Ave.. Dallas. 75246; 826-6276

Robert Nelson McClelland, gastroenterologic surgery (pancreatic, biliary); The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-9031; 648-3540

G. Tom Shires III. gastroenterologic surgery (general surgery, gastrointestinal cancer); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas, 75235-9031: 648-3050

SURGICAL ONCOLOGY

James Frank Huth, general surgical oncology (breast cancer, liver cancer, melanoma [soft tissue sarcomas]); Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital: Dallas County Hospital District; St. Paul Medical Center; VA Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-9031: 648-9460



FAMILY MEDICINE

Carl Edward Couch. Baylor Medical Center-Garland; Family Medical Center, 530 Clara Barton Blvd., Garland, 75042; 272-6561

Seth Bailey Cowan, general family practice; Baylor Medical Center-Garland: Family Hearth Care Associates. 3232 Broadway Blvd.. Garland. 75043; 864-0252

Michael Steven de Larios, Baylor University Medical Center; office: 2801 Lemmon Ave. W.. Suite 310, Dallas, 75204; 720-0264 Richard Leon Grandjean. (families with young children, minor surgery, preventive medicine); Baylor University Medical Center: office: 9323 Garland Rd., Suite 207, Dallas. 75218; 327-3333

Perry E. Gross, Baylor University Medical Center, Suite 454. Dallas, 75246:823-2166

Kevin Charles Oeffinger. Zale Lipshy University Hospital; St. Paul Medical Center; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235; 648-7840

Shelley Roaten, Jr., general family practice; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; St. Paul Medical Center: Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas. 75235-9067: 648-7840

T. Theodore Teel, general family practice; Baylor University Medical Center; office: 2514 S. Buckner Blvd.. Dallas. 75227; 381-1187

INTERNAL MEDICINE (GENERAL)

William Mark Armstrong, Baylor University Medical Center; office: 3434 Swiss Ave.. Suite 420, Dallas. 75204; 828-5020

Robert King Bass, (cardiology, gastroenterology, endocrinology); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; office: 3330 Douglas Ave., Dallas. 75219; 526-8808

John Wayne Burnside. (difficult diagnostic problems, addictions]; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital: The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9005; 648-2097

Michael Chiu, (sexually transmitted diseases); Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Department of Internal Medicine, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 5235-8889: 648-2992

Robert Reed Click, Jr., Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-9124; 648-3100

Leonard J. Comess, Doctors Hospital of Dallas: office: 1000 Emerald Isle, Suite 118. Dallas. 75218: 321-6485

M. Scott Daniel. Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; North Texas Internist, 8335 Walnut Hill Ln. Suite 120. Dallas, 75231: 368-6424

Robert Lee Fine, (preventive medicine, geriatrics): Baylor University Medical Center; office: 3434 Swiss Ave., Suite 430, Dallas, 75204; 828-5030

Philip Goodman, Presbyterian Hospital; office: 7150 Greenville Ave.. Suite 650, Dallas, 75231; 369-3613

Robert Joseph Haddox. St. Paul Medical Center; office: 1000 Emerald Isle. Suite 118. Dallas, 75200; 321-6485

Richard Coleman Johnston. St. Paul Medical Center (Dallas); office: 5100 N. O’Connor Blvd.. Suite 200, Irving, 75039; 556-1616

Allen Maulsby Jones, (general internal medicine): Baylor University Medical Center; office: 3434 Swiss Ave., Suite 320. Dallas. 5246; 821-1720

R. Ellwood Jones. (liver disease, general internal medicine): Baylor University Medical Center; office: 3434 Swiss Ave., Dallas, 75204; 828-5060

Arnold H. Kassanoff, (general cardiovascular disease, general internal medicine): Presbyterian Hospital; Cardiology and Internal Medicine Associates, 7150 Greenville Ave., Suite 650. Dallas. 75231-5193; 369-3613

Lynne M. Kirk, geriatric medicine: Parkland Memorial Hospital; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-9005; 648-3433

Paul Ewing Madeley, general cardiovascular disease: Baylor University Medical Center; office: 3434 Swiss Ave.. Suite 430. Dallas. 75204; 828-5030

Russell Lionel Martin, Jr.. (cardiovascular disease, hypertension): Baylor University Medical Center: office: 3434 Swiss Ave., Suite 320, Dallas, 75204; 828-5060

Paul Muncy, (diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, sports medicine); Baylor University Medical Center; office: 3434 Swiss Ave., Suite 420, Dallas, 75204; 828-5020

Paul Arnold Neubach, Baylor University Medical Center; office: 3434 Swiss Ave., Suite 410, Dallas. 75204; 828-5010

Stuart Frederick Owen, (health maintenance issues, risk factor control, diabetes mellitus, general internal medicine); Baylor University Medical Center, Suite 1004, 3600 Gaston Ave.. Dallas. 75246: 827-7600

Murray Pizette. Doctors Hospital of Dallas; office: 1000 Emerald Isle, Suite 118, Dallas, 75218-3949; 321-6485

Irving David Prengler, (inpatient acute hospital care, disease prevention and health maintenance); Texas Primary Care Associates; Baylor University Medical Center. Suite 550. 3600 Gaston Ave.. Dallas, 75246: 821-1177

W. Gary Reed, general internal medicine; Zale Lipshy University Hospital; Parkland Memorial Hospital; The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-8889; 648-2992

Albert Dee Roberts, Jr.. (general nephrology, general internal medicine); Zale Lipshy University Hospital: The University of Texas-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd.. Dallas. 75235-8889; 648-8897

Joseph Martin Rothstein, Baylor University Medical Center, Suite 1004, 3600 Gaston Ave., Dallas, 75246: 827-7600

Walter Nathaniel Skinner, office: 8230 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 804, Dallas. 75231; 363-6217

Neal Lawrence Sklaver. (headaches, primary care, general internal medicine); Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas; Medical Specialists Associated, 5461 La Sierra Dr.. Dallas, 75231-4198; 692-8541

Randlow Smith, Jr., office: 3434 Swiss Ave.. Suite 330, Dallas. 75204; 828-5070

Paul Arthur Tobolowsky. Medical City Dallas Hospital; Dallas Diagnostic Association, Building C. Suite 300; 991-6000

Martin Earl True, Jr.. (general cardiology, general gastroenterology, general infectious disease): Presbyterian Hospital; office: 8210 Walnut Hill Ln.. Suite 505. Dallas, 75231; 369-8101

Paul Douglas Wade, office; 5939 Harry Hines Blvd., Suite 930. Dallas. 75235; 630-6222

Kenneth L. Walgren, St. Paul Medical Center; office: 5959 Harry Hines Blvd., Suite 402, Dallas. 75235; 630-7866

Frederick D. Winter, Jr.. Baylor University Medical Center: office; 3434 Swiss Ave., Suite 410. Dallas. 75204; 828-5010

Kathleen Rae Zeller, Parkland Memorial Hospital; Dallas Diagnostic Association, Suite C300: 991-6000

PEDIATRICS

Carolyn Dickson Ashworth. Medical Center of Piano; Pediatric Associates of North Texas. 3721 W. 15th St.. Suite 603, Plano, 75075-7755; 867-6880

Albert L Blakes. office; 350 Westpark Way. Suite 112. Euless. 76040; 817-379-6933

Michael Edwin Brown. Children’s Medical Center, Presbyterian Hospital; office:8355 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 200, Dallas. 75231; 369-7661

Debra Lou Bums. Children’s Medical Center. Presbyterian Hospital; office: 8315 Walnut Hill Ln.. Suite 140, Dallas, 75231; 750-8496

Steven Davis Crow, office: 1112 N. Floyd Rd.. Richardson, 75080; 952-0280

Phyllis Ann Davis. Children’s Medical Center (Dallas), Presbyterian Hospital of Piano; Medical Center of Piano; office: 6200 W. Parker Rd.. Suite 410. Piano, 75093; 608-8380

Duane L. Dowell. (adolescents); Children’s Medical Center; Parkland Memorial Hospital; office: 6303 Harry Hines Blvd.. Suite 101, Dallas. 75235-5228; 640-0300

Molly Droge, Children’s Medical Center; Medical City Dallas Hospital; office: 5525A Arapaho Rd.. Dallas, 75248; 385-6450

Ross Leland Finkelman, Children’s Medical Center: Medical City Dallas Hospital; Presbyterian Hospital; office: 8355 Walnut Hill Ln.. Suite 200. Dallas, 75231-4200; 369-7661

John Foster, Children’s Medical Center; Presbyterian Hospital: Presbyterian Hospital of Piano; Medical City Dallas Hospital; Baylor University Medical Center: St. Paul Medical Center; office: 8355 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 200. Dallas. 75231; 369-7661

Charles Morris Ginsburg, (pediatric infectious disease, pediatric emergency medicine, medical toxicology, general pediatrics); Children’s Medical Center; The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, 75235-9063; 648-3563

Jules Greif, Parkland Memorial Hospital; Children’s Medical Center; Bluitt Flowers Health Center, 303 Overton Rd.. Dallas. 75216; 590-4340

Joseph Arthur Hanig. Children’s Medical Center; office: 8355 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 105, Dallas. 75231; 368-3659

James Patrick Hieber. Clinic of Pediatric Associates. 8355 Walnut Hill Ln.. Suite 105. Dallas. 75231; 368-3659

Albert Gerard Karam. Children’s Medical Center (Dallas), Medical City Dallas Hospital (Dallas); Presbyterian Hospital (Dallas); office: 1112 N. Floyd Rd., Richardson. 75080: 952-0280

Hugh Leslie Moore II, (pediatric nephrology, infectious disease, general pediatrics); Children’s Medical Center; Clinical Pediatric Associates, 8355 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 105, Dallas, 75231: 368-3659

Gary C. Morchower, general pediatrics, pediatric gastroenterology, learning dis-abilites in children, adolescent and young adult medicine); Children’s Medical Center (Dallas]; Medical City Dallas Hospital (Dallas); Presbyterian Hospital (Dallas); Richardson Professional Park. Two, 1112 N. Floyd Rd., Suite Six. Richardson, 75080-4243; 231-2551

Daniel Dean Nale. Children’s Medical Center; office: 9304 Forest Ln., Suite 150, Dallas, 75243-8953; 343-9696

Joseph Paul Peterman, office: 8222 Douglas Ave.. Dallas, 75225; 987-0777 John Richard Porter, (adolescent medicine, general pediatrics); Children’s Medical Center (Dallas); Medical City Dallas Hospital (Dallas); Presbyterian Hospital (Dallas): office: 1112 N.Floyd Rd.. Suite 10. Richardson, 75080-4243; 235-911

Claude Brockman Prestidge, (pediatric pulmonology, cystic fibrosis, asthma, genera! pediatrics); Children’s Medical Center: Presbyterian Hospital; Baylor University Medical Center; St. Paul Medical Center; office: 8355 Walnut Hill Ln., Suite 200. Dallas. 75231; 369-7661

Sharon Rae, office: 350 Westpark Way, Suite 112, Euless. 76040; 379-6933

Wilfred Leroy Raine, Children’s Medical Center; Medical City Dallas Hospital; St. Paul Medical Center; office: 7310 S. Westmoreland. Dallas, 75237; 296-6666 Janet E. Squires, (infectious disease, AIDS, abused children); Children’s Medical; 640-2329

Joel B. Steinberg, (pediatric sleep disorders, pediatric obesity and nutrition problems, general pediatrics); Children’s Medical Center; 640-2730

How to Choose a Good Doctor

CHOOSING A DOCTOR FOR YOURSELF OR YOUR family is one of the most important decisions you’ll make. You’ll need to be comfortable enough with the doctor to reveal things that you might not tell anyone else on the planet-not even your spouse. You want a physician who will take the time and make me effort to listen to you and then explain your options in language that is understandable without consulting Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary.

You can do several things to improve your chances of finding a competent, caring physician without months of trial and error.



First, what not to do:

1. Don’t take the advice of a friend as gospel. (“Oh, he’s such a friendly guy… “) There are plenty of lik-able physicians who graduated at the bottom of their classes or whose hands shake more than you’d like.

Dont depend on commercial locating services. While such services may be able to provide information about which insurance plans are accepted, office hours, size of group, etc., remember that the physicians pay a handsome fee to be listed, often as much as $1,500 up front and $300 for every patient referred.

Dont depend exclusively on physician referral services run by hospitals. While it’s true that typically no money changes hands, the physicians are usually listed because they have privileges at that institution-and that fact doesn’t tell you enough.



So what should you do?

1. Call the doctor’s office and ask three questions:

Is the doctor Board Certified in his specialty-i.e., has he passed a comprehensive oral and written exam as well as completed an accredited residency training program after internship? Doing so makes a doctor Board Eligible. After two years in practice, he then becomes Board Certified. You’d be surprised at how many licensed, practicing physicians are neither.

Where and when did she graduate from medical school and where was her residency training done? While many foreign medical graduates are excellent physicians, standards of training vary widely around the world.

‧ How many people does the doctor share call with, and are they also Board Certified? If your physician is in a group of 15 or 20, you may seldom see her when you need her.

2. If you are looking for an Ob-Gyn or surgeon, call the hospital where you would like to receive care.

Ask to speak to either a labor and delivery nurse or an operating room nurse, as appropriate. They know who’s competent and who’s compassionate. Ask for three names of trustworthy physicians. If nurses are prohibited from making recommendations, ask who the nurse uses. Call back several times on different days to ask the same question of other nurses.

3. Call the State Board of Medical Examiners (1-512- 305-7010). Ask if the physician you are interested in has ever been sanctioned or had his license restricted or revoked in the past. Remember: Many physicians have been investigated on the strength of anonymous and unfounded complaints, but those actually sanctioned have violated state statutes within the Medical Practice Act of Texas. 4. When you’ve found a doctor who looks good on paper, make an appointment for a get-acquainted session. Don’t hesitate to ask questions right off the bat. A good doctor will have scheduled extra time for you as a new patient and should feel comfortable answering questions about his education, training, and experience. Don’t be intimidated because she has a medical degree and you don’t. It’s your body and your health. If the doctor takes offense at questions politely phrased, then find another one. Likewise, go back to step one with any physi -cian who bridles at your request for a second opinion.

Finally, if you need a specialist and you already have a doctor, ask him for a referral. Physicians refer to peers whom they know will take good care of their patients, not just because it’s good medicine but because they may now be held legally liable for those referrals. A word of warning, however; If you’ve chosen to join a “gatekeeper” HMO where you must see a designated primary care provider before seeing any specialist, that primary care provider may have a financial incentive to discourage you from seeing the appropriate specialist, and even if he allows it. he may have to limit the choices of which doctors he recommends, depending on plan affiliation.



Jeffery R Tburston, M.D., a Dallas Ob-Gry, is the autbor ofDeath of Compassion.

C. Venkata S. Ram

Heart Disease/Cardiovascular Disease

A STROKE OF FATE LED DR. C. VENKATA S. Ram to the study of hypertension. As a resident at Brown University-Rhode Island Hospital in the mid 70s, he treated a young man who had suffered a stroke that left him paralyzed. “It appeared at the time that his stroke was due to undiagnosed and therefore untreated high blood pressure,” says Dr. Ram, a leading hypertension specialist and professor of interna] medicine at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. “At the time, we were beginning to know that high blood pressure was very common, but that it may not cause any symptoms until it is too late. It occurred to me that if one could commit himself to a career where you could develop a treatment of hypertension, that would be an important contribution to society.”

Indeed, the 47-year-old director of the hypertension clinics at St. Paul Medical Center and Parkland Memorial Hospital has devoted his entire medical career to what he calls “the silent killer. ” Some patients experience hypertension for years with no apparent effects-until they suffer a heart attack, stroke, or congestive heart failure. Dr. Ram is currently investigating whether antihypertensive drugs can arrest and reverse the cardiac complications hypertension causes in a patient. “The greatest challenge doctors have in the treatment of hypertension is to convince patients that although they might be feeling well, they need to change their lifestyle and take medicines,” he says. “In the medical field, there are not too many situations where we give treatment to people who have no symptoms.”



PROFILES BY KIMBERLY GOAD

Steven E. Harms

Cancer/Radiology

AS A FRESHMAN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF Arkansas, Dr. Steven E. Harms witnessed firsthand the devastation of breast cancer. His mother was diagnosed with the disease at a time (the early 70s) when early detection was virtually nonexistent and treat-ment often meant full mastectomy. Some 25 years later, the 43-year-old Baylor University Medical Center physician is at the vanguard of a revolutionary new way to diagnose breast cancer. Called Rotating Delivery of Excitation Off-Resonance- RODEO for short-the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique uses magnetic fields and radio waves to create a three-dimensional image of breast tissue. With RODEO, breast tissue remains black while tumors are illuminated. The technique is twice as sensitive in the detection of breast cancer among women who cannot be effectively imaged through mammography-typically, women with breast implants and women who have what Dr, Harms calls “dense breasts” (often, young women and postmenopausal women).

Not surprisingly, Dr. Harms, who studied with MRI originator Paul Lauderbur before he joined Baylor in 1983 as director of its MRI unit, made international headlines when he presented his findings on RODEO to the Radiological Society of North America four years ago. Now Baylor is the only hospital in Dallas (and one of only three centers in the United States} to offer the technique. But Dr. Harms is hopeful his discovery will become more widespread. As he points out, RODEO has myriad uses. “The same technique allowed us to pick up fragments of cartilage in Troy Aikman’s elbow and in Emmitt Smiths shoulder,” he says. “Its not just a women’s thing.”

Duke S. Samson

Stroke/Neurological Surgery

Dr. Duke S. Samson was laid up in the hospital with a football injury his sophomore year at Stanford University when he determined his life’s course. Recovering from a lengthy knee operation, he opened his eyes, looked around, and liked what he saw. “Medicine,” it seemed to him, “was a little like playing ball. You bring all your energies to focus on one problem in a fixed period of time and it’s easy to determine within a fairly quick period of time whether you’ve won or lost.”

It’s safe to say the 53-year-old chief of neurosurgery and director of the training program at The UT Southwestern Medical Center wins more often than he loses. The internationally esteemed brain surgeon has spent his career researching brain blood flow, acute stroke, and spasm of cerebral vessels. “It’s an interesting conundrum: Working with the brain and the blood vessels of the brain is a unique experience-technically, because the tissues are so small and so fragile, but also emotionally because you are dealing with the essence of the patient,” says this surgeon whose grueling schedule has him in the OR up to seven times a week. Off hours, Dr, Samson takes to the highway-astride his motorcycle. But that’s something he’d rather not discuss, As he says: “A neurosurgeon who rides a motorcycle is like a preacher who uses handguns.”

Richard L. Wasserman

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease/Allergy & Immunology

DR. RICHARD L. WASSERMAN SEES patients on both ends of the immunodeficiency spectrum. On one extreme, the pediatrician treats rare cases of severe combined immunodeficiency, the so-called “bubble-baby kids” born without an ability to fight infection. At the opposite extreme: children suffering from asthma. The disease-in which an inflammation of the small airwaves causes spasms which, in turn, interfere with breathing-is the most common serious chronic illness in children. About 7.5 percent of American children suffer from asthma-and the percentage is growing.

“I don’t think there are as many areas where the illness is as serious and the treatment results can be as good as in the care of asthma,” says the 47-year-old director of the immunology clinic at Children’s Medical Center and clinical assistant professor of pediatrics at The UT Southwestern Medical Center. In the absence of a cure, Dr. Wasserman focuses the core of his treatment on educating families about asthma therapy and medication so that they can treat the disease themselves. ” Nobody lives in a box, and asth -ma is affected by pollen, exposure to cigarette smoke,” he says. “People have to be taught that it’s a chronic illness.”

Roby Dan Mize

Trauma/Orthopedic Surgery

DR. ROBY DAN MIZE NO LONGER SPE-cializes in the kind of high-drama trauma care portrayed on “E.R.” The orthopedic surgeon, whose patients include restaurant executive Norman Brinker and for mer Dallas mayor Jack Evans, deals with patients well after the trauma. The founding partner of Texas Orthopaedic Associates- which is based at Presbyterian Medical Center-Dr. Mize is best known for his innovative work with severe knee injuries. Following his training at Parkland Memorial Hospital, known around the world for its trauma center, Dr. Mize studied at the University of Basel in Switzerland, where he picked up what’s known as the Swiss AO technique, a means of surgically treating fractures that was commonly accepted throughout Europe at the time, but considered too aggressive-and. thus, controversial- in the United States.

When he returned to Dallas in 1977, Dr. Mize brought the AO technique with him and became instrumental in popularizing the procedure throughout the Southwest. Now, he divides his practice three ways: reconstructive trauma surgery, pediatric orthopedics, and sports medicine. For almost 20 years, he has served as team doctor for St. Mark’s School of Texas; he also serves as medical consultant for The Hockaday School.

Charles B. Shuey, Jr.

Pneumonia & Influenza/Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine

AS CHIEF OF PULMONARY SERVICES AND director of critical care medicine at Baylor University Medical Center, Dr. Charles B. Shuey, Jr. practices his dual specialty against a most dramatic backdrop: the adult intensive care units at Baylor. And because his expertise touches the majority of patients in ICU- specifically, those recovering from any kind of surgery that involves opening the chest-the lung specialist is like the hospital’s conductor who orchestrates the needs of patients who suffer from a variety of serious illnesses, but come together in their need of pulmonary care. A graduate of Highland Park High School, Southern Methodist University, and The UT Southwestern Medical Center, the 59 year-old physician “grew up in a medical family, so I never really thought of doing anything else.”

Philip Raskin

Diabetes/Endocrinology & Metabolism

DR. PHILIP RASKIN PRESIDES OVER what he calls “the best-kept secret” in the Dallas medical community: the University Diabetes Treatment Center at Parkland Memorial Hospital. It’s the only such inpatient unit in Dallas devoted specifically to treating diabetes.

The diabetes expert chose to devote his career to teaching, treating, and researching the metabolic disorder in an effort to emulate a favorite professor at the University of Pittsburgh. Now 55, he is known as a tough taskmaster who insists on complete adherence to a strict diet and exercise program, as well as regular monitoring of blood sugar levels. His patients either love him or hate him (and go elsewhere). In 1993, he completed work on the Dallas arm of a 10-year national study that found people with the most severe form of diabetes can head off major complications associated with the disease–blindness, kidney disease, and nerve damage often leading to amputation- through unusually intense control of their blood sugar levels. But his goal remains the same: “To find a cure for diabetes and more effective ways to treat it. “

Jay Philip Sanford

AIDS/Infection s Disease

DR. JAY PHILIP SANFORD DECIDED TO specialize in the treatment of infectious diseases during the 1950s, when he could offer a cure for virtually everything that ailed his patients. “We had penicillin and tetracycline and everybody thought we’d solved all the problems with infectious dis-ease,” says Dr. Sanford, a 67-year-old clinical professor of internal medicine at The UT Southwestern Medical Center, Obviously, his career has taken him into a dramatically altered world. “We now have germs that have become resistant to many of the antibiotics we have, and that has complicated life greatly.”

Dr. Sanford saw his first cases of the mysterious illness that would come to be known as AIDS in January 1981. Fifteen years into the plague, with no cure in sight, Dr. Sanford helps the patients he treats at Parkland Memorial and Zale Lipshy hospitals approach their illness as a chronic disease, rather than a fatal one. “There are new agents that appear to be able to suppress the virus,” says the doctor who co-authored The Sanford Guide to HIV/AIDS Therapy, the leading textbook on AIDS. “There is every reason to believe we can convert AIDS into something people can live a virtually normal life span with.”

KIMBERLY A. YONKERS

Suicide/Psychiatry

FOR DR. KIMBERLY A. YONKERS, THE difference between men and women is hardly academic. It sits at the root of her research into hormone-related mental health problems among women-premenstrual syndrome, postpartum depression, and depression associated with menopause. “Mood disorders, particularly for women, are a major public health concern,” says the 38-year-old psychiatrist with the obstetrics and gynecology department at The UT Southwestern Medical Center. “The rate of depression in women is twice as high as men. We are investigating whether hormones trigger some of the depressive illnesses seen in women.” In the four years she has been at UT-Southwestern, she has focused her research on the effect of seratonin, a chemical that carries signals between brain cells. Fluctuations in seratonin are already known to influence mood. Sixty-five percent of Dr. Yonker’s patients have responded to some of the newer antidepressants such as Prozac.

Despite the fact that there are “top-notch scientists who not only believe in the entity but are doing research into the specialty,” she admits that hers is a controversial specialization. Feminists object to the implication that a woman’s mental state could be a product of her menstrual cycle; others question whether such hormone-related mental disorders constitute a legitimate medical concern. “There are people who snicker,” says the psychiatrist, who started out as a women’s studies major at Amherst College and then found her way to Columbia University Medical School when an M.D. seemed the best way to develop her thesis. “But my patients know PMS is real.”

Making Dallas a Medical Mecca

Rather than fight for patients, our major hospitals are teaming up.

BY GLENNA WHITLEY

w HEN AN 11 -YEAR-OLD ALASKAN BOY NAMED Duncan Murohy began haying dizzy spells I and seizures, he was referred to a physician in Anchorage, about four hours from his home in Kenai where his father works for Halliburton Energy1 Services.

Given drugs to control an epileptic condition called “complex partial seizures,” Duncan improved. But over time, the seizures worsened until the boy was taking near-toxic levels of medication. Then, last year, his parents learned about an unusual benefit provided to Halliburton employees through Dallas Medical Resource.

DMR flew Duncan to Dallas. At Children’s Medical Center, part of the University of Texas Southwestern Epilepsy Center, neurosurgeon Dr. Derek Bruce operated on the part of Duncan’s brain causing the seizures, The boy is now back home in Alaska and seizure-free.

A unique nonprofit alliance-the first of its kind in the nation- DMR takes the expertise of Dallas specialists and hospitals beyond the city limits to the world. DMR was conceived in the late ’80s, when civic leaders with the Dallas Chamber of Commerce and the Dallas Citizens Council, spearheaded by Bob Rogers, tried to devise ways to shore up the city’s collapsing financial bulwarks. They asked a simple question: What Dallas industry was immune to hard times? The answer: medical services, which in the Dallas area bills more than S5 billion a year.

A health-care task force determined that while Dallas had fine medical facilities, they were little-known or little-used by those outside the city. Ironically, people were leaving Dallas to get specialized care that was available right here from some of the best physicians in the country. With that in mind, the Citizens’ Council funded a study that led to the formation of Dallas Medical Resource.

DMR markets to large employers the services of eight Dallas hospitals-Parkland, Children’s, Baylor, Methodist, Medical City, Presbyterian, St. Paul, and Zale Lipshy, a referral facility for physicians at UT- South western.

Seven of the member hospitals each contribute $ 100,000 a year to the coalition (Parkland pays only $1 because it’s a public hospital), as well as sensitive data about their services that allows DMR to set and publicize a standard of excellence for more than 100 specialized procedures- everything from angioplasty to liver transplants.

Here’s bow it works: DMR analyzes two to three years of an employer’s health benefits data. The employer then sets a fixed price it is willing to pay for selected procedures-on average, 20 to 40 percent lower than what it has been paying. For example, a heart bypass might cost $50,000. If a self-insured company foots the bill for 20 such procedures a year, that adds up to $ 1 million. With DMR, a fixed price of $30,000 per bypass might be set. Then, as part of its health insurance package, the business offers its employees the option of choosing the Dallas specialist and hospital for treatment.

It’s a win-win situation: Companies save money, and employees benefit from treatment by highly specialized physicians who may not be available where the employee lives. Participating DMR cardiologists, by the way, have a 50 percent higher than average sue-cess rate for coronary bypass surgery.

The care is coordinated by a DMR nurse, who talks to the patient’s community physician and links the patient with the specialist in Dallas. The nurse answers questions, arranges airline flights and the transfer of medical records, and helps find a place for the patient’s accompanying family member to stay. After the patient returns home, the DMR nurse coordinates follow-up.

Southland Corp, was the first company to offer the DMR program; to date, 2,500 employees are participating. Since then, DMR has signed up eight more companies, including Haggar Apparel, FINA Inc., Southwest Airlines, and Halliburton. The companies save an average of 20 percent on the cost of health care. Since it started offering services in 1993, DMR has brought about 300 patients to Dallas for treatment.

Doctors like DMR because it gives them more patients-and because they decide who’s good enough to get the referrals from DMR. About 140 area specialists are involved in setting the standards and evaluating their peers, using data provided by physicians and hospitals every six months. DMR evaluates the credentials as well as the outcome of the services offered by physicians, then adds an objective analysis of the submitted data by Dunn & Bradstreet. Only those physicians and hospitals who meet a certain standard of quality in select procedures are put into the referral loop. And there’s another carrot for doctors wary of standard managed-care systems: If the doctor does not agree with the negotiated fee, he or she does not have to accept it.

“We got into it not just because of the savings,” says Linda Beeson, employee benefits supervisor for Halliburton Energy Services, based in Duncan, Okla. “That was secondary. We liked the credentialing that DMR requires, ensuring the quality of care that our employees would receive.”

Halliburton joined DMR in September 1994 and now offers the program to some 10,000 employees and their eligible dependents in 48 states. So far, about 72 Halliburton employees have come to Dallas for treatment, resulting in an estimated savings to the company over a 13 -month period of about $350,000. What’s more, the patients have been pleased. “I really feel like our employees perceive this as a major benefit,” says Beeson.

DMR president and CEO Margaret Jordan, a dynamic woman who started as a nurse and came to Dallas from senior executive positions at Southern California Edison and Kaiser Permanente, says DMR has been in a test mode for the last two years, Hired after the death last year of director Frank Weaver, Jordan says her most immediate concern is a major marketing push to take DMR to an even wider audience, bringing in patients from other parts of Texas and the nation.

” A piece of what we have to do is talk about the whole health care system in Dallas,” says Jordan, “building an image about the quality of health care here. It’s unusual in that you have hospitals collaborating, not competing. It has so much potential, as we are all trying to push the health care system in the direction of being sensitive, responsive, and quality-oriented.”

GORAN B. KLINTMALM

Liver Disease/Surgery

DR. GORAN B. KLINTMALM’S WORLD- the world of organ transplantarion- turns on an axiom oddly out of sync with the natural order of things. In his world, life-for the organ recipient-follows death. “When you’re young you become very close with patients and the families and they become family for you,” says the 46-year-old founding chairman of the Baylor Institute of Transplantation Sciences. “Once you’ve lost enough family, you don’t dare to get as close.”

Dr. Klintmalm trained with Dr. Thomas Starzl, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center surgeon who performed the world’s first liver transplant in 1963. As Dr. Starzl’s protégé, he helped develop the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporins which revolutionized the field of transplantation by significantly reducing organ rejection. In the 12 years Dr. Klintmalm has spent at Baylor University Medical Center, nothing prepared the esteemed surgeon for the spotlight cast on the Baylor transplant team last summer when Mickey Mantle became its most celebrated liver transplant patient. The speed with which the baseball legend received his new liver sparked charges of favoritism and a debate over the public’s right to know versus a patients right to privacy. Almost a year later, Dr, Klintmalm now takes a positive view of the impact of celebrity on his corner of the medical world. Mantle’s death “opened the doors for us to communicate with that large portion of the community that only follows sports news,” he says. “He died in August. Organ donation increased by 11 percent across the country in June and July.”

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