LETTERS

BEHIND THE GREAT WALL

Re: “Who Ruined HigHland Park?” by Prudence Mackintosh [October]. They did not ruin just Highland Park. They have touched all of North Dallas from Northwest Highway to Royal Lane. On my street, Woodland Drive, there are many examples of these monumentalities. Next door, one was built so close to the property line that they couldn’t get their cars in the garage. I was asked to sell 2 feet of my lot to accommodate their mistake. Their offer was fair market value-whatever that is in stupidity.

At about 3 o’clock in the afternoon, we lose contact with the sun, and the 8-foot high fence is like living next to the Great Wall of China.

Apparently big is better, but a whole lot of big is best.

ROBERT M. WOHLFELD

DALLAS



I’m puzzled by your October cover, with the photograph of the beautiful old house at 4900 Lakeside. It seems to me that the house represents exactly the kind of respect for the past and awareness of proportion that you say has been lost as “big money and bigger egos” transform Highland Park. So why use this wonderful house as a “bad” example?

SID HURST

DALLAS

EDITOR’S NOTE: Some readers missed our inside note; where we praised owners of the circa 1930 home, restored in 1989, for choosing to remodel when it would have been cheaper to bulldoze the house and start over. We agree with you that such elegant reminders of the past must be preserved.

BASHING BARRETT

It was amusing to read Steve Bartlett’s statement [“Does Ray Hunt Own City Hall?” September] that during the 18 months the “Miller Myths” were being constructed, he often wanted to say, “This is a joke, light? You’re kidding, aren’t you?”

In fact, he had a perfect opportunity to ask those questions. While filling in as producer of KERA’s program “Between the Lines,” I tried to get the mayor (and city manager John Ware) to appear on the show with Miller to discuss the arena question. Not only did Bartlett and Ware refuse to appear face to face with Miller, but they wouldn’t come on the show even if we put Miller in a completely

different segment!

TIM DICKEY

DALLAS



Ft SEEMS IRONIC THAT IN THE SAME ISSUE THAT Wick Allison suggests The Dallas Observer wield a tougher editing pen on Laura Miller, D would choose to print former Mayor Steve Bartlett’s petulant response to her series of articles. Readers expect more from D than Bartlett’s sophomoric attempt at being clever.

MARK JOHNSTON

DALLAS



BOOSTING BAYLESS

THE BARRY SWITZER ISSUE [SEPTEMBER] IS your best since your resurrection. Boy, can Skip Bayless write!

ROY MILLER

EULES



CATHOLICS’ CONCERNS

AS A CATHOLIC, I READ WITH INTEREST “Innocence Lost” [September]. It was fairly well done.

However, I have a concern. The picture of the “Going Oui of Business Sale” banner on the front of Christ the King Church was unconscionably a fraud. It cheapened the article. You should apologize to your readers.

ROBERT E. HELMS JR.

DALLAS



THE SORDID TALE OF PRIESTS BEING ARREST-ed in Dallas for pedophilia mirrors similar events in Washington where four priests were arrested this year on the same charges. Damages sought are $186 million.

The scandal also feeds into the hostile attitudes of an anti-Catholic population which might not comprehend that the Church’s position on pedophilia is absolute: It is aberrant behavior, a mortal sin, and, under canon law, a grave moral crime. A failure to apply that tenet to civil requirements is an error ai individuals in the Church and not of Church teaching.

ANN SHERIDAN

President, Georgetown \gnalian Society

WASHINGTON, D.C.

TEAR-DOWN TRAGEDIES

LURKING IN THE PAGES OF THE SEPTEMBER Inside Dallas [“Tearing Down the Past”] is the thing that, irritates me most about many residents of this city. I will never, never understand the mentality of these people who go to Preston Hollow and other areas of the city and have the Opportunity to purchase and live in incredible homes, but opt instead to tear them down and build some “luxury” modern ’90s eyesore.

If these demolition buyers are so intrigued with the idea of 500-square-foot walk-in closets and built-in bubbling bathtubs, may I suggest the following:

Hire an architect and an interior designer. Any reputable and successful professional in these fields would probably welcome the opportunity to carefully assist you in adding on to the existing structure while preserving the original qualities of the house.

Look for property elsewhere. There is still lots of room available in Piano, Lewisville, Flower Mound, Coppell, and Valley Ranch.

WARREN L. FARMER

DALLAS

TAXPAYER’S LAMENT

THUMBS UP TO D MAGAZINE FOR ITS SEPtember “Thumbs Down” comments about Alphonso Jackson, the Dallas Housing Authority, and its not caring about the taxpayers. We certainly do care, and we can tell when we’re being ignored, placated, and railroaded by an irresponsible, arbitrary decision.

ROBERTA KENYON

DALLAS



SURPRISE-AND SHOCK

RE: “SURPRISE, THE 25 BEST RESTAURANTS IN Dallas” [August]. Surprise is hardly a word for the results of your article. “Shocked” is the word that comes to mind. Without denigrating some of your choices, tempting though it may be, 1 limit my letter to a serious omission, You cannot, with a straight face, discuss excellent restaurants without putting Old Warsaw near the top of the list. Its delivery of exceptional cuisine and atmosphere is unequaled.

MARK J. ZIMMERMANN

DALLAS



TO SAY THE LEAST, WE ARE VERY DISAPpointed to read of your bad experience at the Angry Dog [Dining Out, September], In our five years of business, we have received relatively few criticisms and we have never received an adverse review in any publication.

Although we average more than 200 lunches every weekday, we do our very best to seat the customer, take his or her order, and handle the check at the conclusion of the meal within one hour. I am shocked that one or more of you apparently waited lor two hours to receive your meal. For that, we apologize.

SHANNON MILLER

Manager, Angry Dog

DALLAS

Newsletter

Keep me up to date on the latest happenings and all that D Magazine has to offer.

Comments