WHAT WOULD HARRY HINES THINK?

NOSTALGIA HARRY HINES, the gentleman, was everything that his street is not. A Mason, a Shriner, and an elder in the First Christian Church, Hines was a respected citizen who ran for governor in 1940, losing to corn-pone candidate W. Lee O’Daniel.

Harry Hines, the boulevard, is home to Geno’s Southern Belles, the Paris Adult Bookstore & Theatre, Good Time Charlies, and the Bare Hare Modeling Studio. Patrons of Mattress Discounters, across from Geno’s, have been known to receive offers to try out their purchases on the way back to the car. Police have likened prostitute hauls on Harry Hines to fishing at a pay-by-the-pound catfish farm.

Harry Hines, the gentleman, was a well-to-do oil operator who lived quietly with his wife Maybelle at The Adolphus Hotel, and who was never crosswise with the law. Harry Hines, the street, was dedicated in 1941 to honor Hines for his distinguished service as chairman of the Texas Highway Commission,

Harry Hines, if he came back today, would need a couple of strong hot chocolates to weather the shock of seeing the street that bears his name. But he might like his bronze plaque on a pedestal. It’s at the intersection of Harry Hines and Harwood. Unless someone’s pawned it.

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