D DOZEN-Twelve Dallas Ghost Stories

1. The Doll Howe-In the wealthy Bluffview area of Dallas sits ahouse, always darkened at night except for a light in one upstairswindow. There, on occasion, you can see a little blonde-haired dollhanging from a noose, swinging slowly. It is said that the little girlwho lived there long ago was brutally murdered by an intruder. Themother, unable to control her grief, went insane. And now, on certain nights, she puts her child’s favorite doll in the window.

2. The Delta Ghost Crew-In the middle of the night at D/FW Airport,people claim to have seen an Airtrans car carrying a flight crewwearing Delta uniforms. The crew circles round and round the airport, as if they are searching for something. Could it be? Are theythe ghost crew from Delta Flight 191 looking for their airplane?

3. The teenage Ghosts of Goar Park-Long ago, in this little park locatedin the heart of a University Park neighborhood, two teenage loversmet for a tryst late one night by the banks of the pond. The nextmorning, they were found by the dam, drowned, their hands stillclasped together. Some believe the two made a love pact and thenkilled themselves. At night, if you sit very quietly beside the pond,you can hear the girl saying softly, “I love you, forever.”

4. The Death Bull of the Mesquite Rodeo-Hotshot, one of the greatestbulls in rodeo history, had been badly beaten the night before-arider had stayed on him for twenty seconds. Humiliated, Hotshotcrashed through the gates and stormed off into the night. The verynext day, the cowboy who had successfully ridden Hotshot wasfound trampled to death in the front yard of his home. To this day,many bull riders confess that they are awakened in their beds lateat night by a strange sound. Outside their window, they hear a snort,a pawing at the ground, and then hoofbeats, as the strange creatureof the night slips away into the darkness.

5. The Crying Children of Carrollton-Around the turn of the century, a strange new family moved into a shack on the town’s north side. The three children were very solemn and didn’t play or act like other kids. One day the family disappeared and was never heard from again. Several months later, a peddler came into town visibly shaken and ghostly white. He said that while walking on the north side of town he had heard a child crying. When he turned around there were three children. But as soon as he started walking toward them, they disappeared. To this day, people claim to hear children crying when they are walking in that area at dusk.

6. The Lady of White Rock lake-In the inky darkness past midnight,around White Rock Lake, a young woman is often seen standingbeside the road, clad in dripping wet clothes. Sympathetic driversusually pick her up, whereupon she asks to be taken to a certain address. When they arrive, she is gone: all that remains is a cold,damp seat where she was. Upon inquiring at the house about heridentity, startled drivers learn that she is the ghost of the residents’daughter who drowned in White Rock Lake many years ago.

7. Snuffer’s Ghost-This popular Lower Greenville bar and grill wasthe site of a speakeasy during Prohibition, and employees at Snuffer’s think supernatural survivors of that era still remain in thebuilding. Workers say they are often the objects of pranks playedby an unseen inhabitant of the building. Long after customers haveleft a table, cigarettes move from one ashtray to another, doors unexpectedly swing to and fro, and on one occasion, red, glaring eyespeered out from under table number seven.

8. The Screaming Bridge-Back in the Fifties, gangs from two rivalhigh schools used to meet at an old abandoned wooden bridge overthe Trinity River. One evening the usually playful taunting betweenthe kids turned ugly, and dares were shouted across the river. It wasarranged for the two football stars from both high schools to provetheir manhood by driving toward each other across the bridge. Asthey approached the halfway point, the bridge collapsed. Today,people fishing out on that part of the lake late at night can hear their dying screams.

9. The Hook Man of the Trinity River-A few years ago, a teenage boyand girl parking down in the Trinity River basin heard a report onthe radio that a dangerous convict had escaped. The man could beidentified by the silver hook that took the place of his left hand. Wor-ried, the boy decided to drive his girlfriend home. Once there, hewalked around to open her car door. Shining ominously in themoonlight, a silver hook dangled from the door handle.

10. Thistle Hill’s Resident-Years ago, a woman working for the Historic Preservation League in Fort Worth was alone in the musicroom of this restored home when she heard footsteps coming downthe stairs. She walked over to the door to see who was there, thenlooked up toward the stairs and saw a man with a mustache andslicked-back hair. He was wearing a white shirt with old-fashionedarmbands, As she started to speak, the man disappeared. Othershave seen the home’s resident, though only for a few seconds.

11. The Witches of Stemmons Towers-Between the buildings of Stem-mons Towers once stood three hooded figures circling a fountain. By day they appeared harmless enough, but as night would fell, people said the statues came alive. They would perform rituals of devil worship and dance around the fountain, which would spout flames.

12. The Schooner House Daughter-When the old Schooner House in Fort Worth was bought from the family and turned into an office, strange things started to happen. While the family was moving out, some large, packed boxes they had left in the basement were unpacked, and the belongings were put in their right places. Shortly after this, a woman touring the house alone felt an icy hand grab her arm while she was in the basement. Later, a tenant of the building heard jazz music while he was there working on a weekend. Many believe the culprit behind these bizarre happenings is the ghost of the family’s daughter who died tragically. She was a jazz pianist.

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