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D Magazine September 1985

Publications

3 faces OF FALL

By TEENA GRITCH MCMILLS
Publications

AN INTERVIEW WITH James Michener

The king of the best-sellers talks about friends and enemies, getting older, television and of course Texas, his new novel of the Lone Star state
By Chris Tucker
Publications

ARTS THAT PLAY IN L.A.

Is the theater of tomorrow Tamara?
By Tim Allis
Publications

BEYOND THE BASICS

What happens when Johnny can’t read, write or pray in a traditional classroom?
By D Magazine
Publications

BLORDE AMBITION

In the beginning there was Kim Dawson, grand doyenne of the fickle world of Dallas modeling. Then Tanya Blair began to muscle in on her turf And that’s when the smiles began to crack…
By Skip Hollandsworth
Publications

DINING NEW ARRIVALS

The hottest new restaurants in the Metroplex
By D Magazine
Publications

EDITOR’S PAGE

What a way to run a railroad
By Ruth Miller Fitzgibbons
Publications

ESSAY ON HEROES

They’re famous because we need them
By Jo Brans
Publications

HEALTH R FOR PROFITS

Doctors begin to sell themselves
By Katherine Dinsdale
Publications

HEARSAY

By Rob and Monica Allyn
Publications

INSIDE FASHION

WHAT’S HAPPENING AROUND TOWN
By D Magazine
Publications

INSIGHTS

And He spake to them through a bullhorn, saying. . .
By Chris Tucker
Publications

MIXED METAPHORS

PAISLEY AND PLAID, RHINESTONES WITH PEARLS AND FUN FUR-FOR NIGHT AND DAY
By D Magazine
Publications

SPORTS HOG HATERS

Why we love to loathe the Redskins
By Paul Wattles
Publications

STORE LISTINGS

WHERE TO FIND THE CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE
By D Magazine
Publications

STREET STALK

By TEENA GRITCH MCMILLS
Publications

TEXAS, FLAT OUT

Seeing through the eyes of the image-makers: 17 posters from our masters of the genre
By Tim Allis
Image
Local News

The Lost Community of Sandbranch

Just beyond the glittering corridors of downtown Dallas is a filthy, rank pocket of poverty. Here, in 1985, is a community without basic city services, including drinkable water. And here is what happens when powerless people struggle to get help.
By Richard West