Wednesday, January 19, 2022 Jan 19, 2022
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STREET TALK

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STREET TALK

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Although women have dominated residential real estate brokerage in Dallas for years, it’s not often that they handle the development of commercial projects. But take a look at the women that the Crow Development Co. has hired to manage major multiuse projects in Southwest Dallas County.

Kathleen Cunningham, for example, is a vice president and area partner at Crow Development Co. and is involved with land acquisition and development of planned residential communities. Formerly the city’s interim director of planning and development, she is now in charge of developments in Lancaster and Cedar Hill that have total estimated values of $190 million. Nancy Lyon, another vice president and area partner with Crow Development, is in charge of the $340 million Westchester project in Grand Prairie. And then there’s Crow Development’s director of landscape design, Nan Arnold, who is heading landscaping efforts for all three projects. Martha McCartney, vice president of finance for Crow Development, is responsible for financial work on all of the projects.



Dallas County Elections Administrator Conny McCor-mack says that even though April 6 is the traditional Dallas city election date, it will be unusual this year since the county is also homing a bond elec-tion and several surrounding municipalities are holding regular elections for city council and school board positions.

McCormack says she invited all the cities to combine their respective ballots with the county ballot, but only Dallas, Garland and Richardson agreed. Voters in those cities will go to their regular polling places. But voters in cities such as Duncanville will have to cast their votes in several different locations. Despite the difference, McCormack predicts that voter turnout in the combined voting places will be 17 to 18 percent of the 890,000 registered voters. That’s normal for city elections but about 10 percent higher than usual for county elections.



Some of the city’s most promising local talent-actors, singers, musicians and others-are actually performing for their meals at the Loews Anatole Hotel’s Terrace Café. Every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m., new talents are given a chance to try out their acts on patrons at the restaurant and in return dine “on the house,” says Tom Ed-mond, a Terrace chef who sings opera music at the restaurant on Fridays and Saturdays around noon.