LETTERS

HUFFY HUNTERSOUNDS OFF



THUMBS DOWN to you and your contest [“The Great Cadillac Treasure Hunt,” April, May and June]. Do you know how many hours I spent on the cotton-pickin’ thing, only to learn that the Cadillac keys were found three days before I received my copy of the magazine with the last set of clues?

You may have gained a little publicity for the magazine, but you are paying for it with the good will of your faithful subscribers.

Jeanette Bland

Richardson



Editor’s note: We conservatively estimated the enthusiasm for the contest. If we ever do it again, we’ll make certain that all “finalists” get the last set of clues simultaneously.



BANKING ON BRAINPOWER



CONGRATULATIONS on the article about Dr. Ruth Tiffany Barnhouse [“The Lady is a Priest,” June]. It’s about time D Magazine featured someone who lives by brainpower rather than the usual assemblage of those who run after money power.

A few years ago I gave a gift subscription of your magazine to a New England couple who were thinking of retiring to Dallas. This proved to be a mistake. They were so appalled at the materialism reflected in the pages of D Magazine that they decided to stay put in the Snow Belt. Too bad they didn’t read this issue.

Please keep up the broadened image of Big D, for all our sakes!

Alessandra Comini

professor of art history,

Southern Methodist University



GETTING THROUGH TO MR. BIG



THANKS GO TO Robert Wilson for addressing a subject that has long been neglected in the May issue of D Magazine [“Insights”].

Mr. Big’s secretary filtering his phonecalls really rouses my ire. To wit: “May Ispeak to Mr. Big, please?” “Who’s calling?” “My name is ” “Who are you with?” “No one; I’m alone.” “Why do you wish to speak to Mr. Big?” “It’s personal.” (Long pause.) “Mr. Big does not know you.” “I don’t know him, either. Who is he hiding from?”

After another similar conversation, Mr. Big comes on the line. “Why are you so discourteous with my secretary?” “Why is she so discourteous with me?” “Well,” says Mr. Big, “this concludes our conversation.”

You may gather from this conversation just what opinion we have for each other and how much business I or any of my associates will be doing with Mr. Big at any time in the future.

J.J. Rowland

Dallas



THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES



I RECENTLY noticed a letter inquiring about a song, Dallas, I Love You, performed publicly in the Park Cities some 20 years ago [“Answer Page,” May]. I think I can shed some light.

At about that time, some of the principals of a now-defunct Dallas recording company, Commercial Recording Corp. (CRC), were also members of the local investment group that founded radio station KVIL to serve the Park Cities. CRC supplied all the promotional and identification jingles for KVIL. As part of the group involved in both companies, composer Tom Merriman and I provided original songs celebrating Dallas and the state of Texas. Merriman wrote the Dallas song and I wrote the Texas song. Thanks for jogging my memory.

Bob Farrar

Dallas

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