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Coronavirus

COVID-19 Bulletin (01/06/22)

Nearly one in three ICU patients have COVID-19 in North Texas. More than 30 percent of tests are coming back positive.
Margaret Bondoc, ACNPC-AG, intensivist on the ICU staff at Methodist Dallas
Margaret Bondoc, an intensivist who works in the intensive care unit at Methodist Dallas, wears requisite personal protective gear.
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COVID-19 Bulletin (01/06/22)

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Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins reported a four-day total of 4,800 new COVID-19 cases and 10 deaths on Wednesday.


North Texas has 2,681 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, representing 19.4 percent of available bed capacity ad 32.3 percent of adult ICU patients according to Steve Love, the DFW Hospital Council President and CEO.


UTSW modeling says that Dallas County will surpass its previous peak of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, the Dallas Morning News reports. The county will likely have over 1,200 hospitalized COVID-19 patients by the end of the month.


More than one in three COVID-19 tests are coming back positive, according to Texas Tribune. Previous highs for positive tests were near 20 percent, and the current figure doesn’t include at-home testing, which is now widely available.

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