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Books

Satanic Verses Talk Tonight

Dallas Institute hosts the gig in support of Banned Books Week.
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Photo by Christoph Kockelmann via Wikimedia Commons

This is Banned Books Week, which “brings together the entire book community … in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.” Yesterday PEN America released a study showing that from July 2021 to June 2022, Texas banned more books than any other state. The study addressed the book-banning efforts of several North Texas school districts.

With that as a backdrop, tonight the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture is hosting a talk about The Satanic Verses, written by Salman Rushdie, who is still recovering from that stabbing attack last month. On the mic will be Dr. Jaina Sanga, a Mumbai-born Dallasite, a fellow of the Dallas Institute, and the author of Salman Rushdie’s Postcolonial Metaphors.

Things get rolling at 6 p.m. at the Dallas Institute’s Nancy Cain Marcus Conference Center, on Routh Street. It costs $30 for non-members, and you have to register, but if this post inspires you to attend, I’ll Venmo you 10 bucks because, full disclosure, my wife does P.R. for the Dallas Institute, and I need all the brownie points I can get.

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Tim Rogers

Tim Rogers

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Tim is the editor of D Magazine, where he has worked since 2001. He won a National Magazine Award in…

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