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Leading Off (1/28/21)

Want to see what 1,950 pounds of drugs looks like?

Former Dallas Financial Adviser Faces Felony Chargers. Sarah Helen Hancock, who had her license revoked five years ago, was indicted by a Dallas County grand jury last week for theft, misappropriation of fiduciary property, and securities fraud. The 61-year-old is charged with taking money from clients’ accounts and putting it into her own business account where it “would all but evaporate.” One account, with a listed portfolio value of $1.6 million, only contained $24,000. After the Texas State Securities Board revoked Hancock’s license for collecting “money from clients in amounts that far exceeded what those clients were contractually required to pay” from 2007 to 2015, Hancock started an interior design and remodeling company. Meanwhile, back in 2010, her 1,610-square-foot, one-bedroom Highland Park West cottage, which she had recently bought post-divorce, was featured on the Park Cities Historic & Preservation Society’s Historic Home Tour. At the time, she told the Dallas Morning News that she had taken several trips to France with her architect to shop for items for the home. “Being single again,” she said, “I loved buying everything and anything that I liked.”

Dallas County Hits Another COVID-19 Death Milestone. Dallas County reported 1,671 new coronavirus cases yesterday and 40 more deaths, the most reported in a single day. Two of the women were in their twenties, one of whom did not have underlying health conditions. Starting today and running through Saturday, City of Dallas employees plan to inoculate 5,000 people at a drive-through site at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center. They will be distributing Moderna vaccines to residents in phase 1A or 1B who previously registered with the county. Here’s what you need to know about getting shots.

The DEA’s Dallas Field Office Reports the Largest Seizure of Meth and Heroin in the Branch’s History. A dog sniffed them out at a traffic stop of a refrigerated tractor-trailer in Denton County on October 8. Special Agent Eduardo A. Chávez said the drugs had been smuggled across the U.S.-Mexican border by traffickers working with the Jalisco New Generation Cartel, or CJNG. Apparently the pandemic has forced smugglers to travel less and carry heavier loads. Here’s what 1,950 pounds and $45 million worth of drugs looks like.

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