Education

St. Mark’s Student Creates a Stir With ‘War on Boys’ Editorial

Not a good look.

A ridiculous op-ed in the Remarker, St. Mark’s student newspaper, is apparently not going over well at St. Mark’s sister school, Hockaday. The piece is titled “Kavanaugh and the War on Boys.” Click here to read the whole thing, but here’s how it starts:

Boys will be boys. It was a phrase that used to be an admission of fact — that boys have natural tendencies to make reckless decisions, take enormous risks, and have unbridled ambition.

Now, that phrase is absolutely heresy to some.

Saying that one sentence could get you called a myriad of names from “sexist” to “rape apologist.”

In light of the Kavanaugh saga, the topic of the safety of our boys has come up again. Kavanaugh was put through a gauntlet of ridicule and slander. Even after an FBI investigation cleared him, he is still to this day called a rapist by some.

Boys, now more than ever, have to be careful to a degree bordering on crazed paranoia. It kills the essential part that relationships play in the path to manhood.

It’s not mentally healthy for boys.

Oh, and then there’s this:

Boyhood in general is under attack in this nation. More and more boys are taught that their masculinity needs to be curtailed. Boys can’t be in relationships anymore in fear of being called a rapist. …

Don’t make our identity a devil on our shoulders.

Instead, we should accept the reality that we can never take the boyish instincts out of men.

I’d like to make two points about this op-ed. Well, three. First, it’s terrible. It’s so terrible that I’m not going to bother pointing out precisely why it’s terrible. Because it’s obviously terrible.

Second, no one should be forced to have his high school writing follow him around online for the rest of his life. That’s why I’ve obscured the kid’s name, title, and face in the image of the op-ed I’ve linked to above. I’m so thankful that the internet wasn’t invented until after I got out of college.

Third — and this is the most important point — blame for this embarrassing article falls on the St. Mark’s faculty advisor who oversees the Remarker. This writer needed someone to save him from himself — and have a serious talk with him. Maybe, though, the wider attention this op-ed is generating will give St. Mark’s an opportunity to have a conversation with its entire student body about what the Proud Boys are and why one wouldn’t want to align one’s beliefs with theirs. Also might be a good idea to teach the boys that it’s pretty easy to be in a relationship without fear of being called a rapist.

When I refer to the wider attention the op-ed has generated, I’m going based on this Medium post from an anonymous Marksman that addresses reaction from the students at Hockaday. It begins:

The first aspect of the matter that comes to mind is the context in which the editorial exists and how that shapes its intent and content. As male students at a single-sex, wealthy, and exclusive private school in a bourgeois, primarily Republican area, we hold an enormous amount of privilege that must be taken into account when parsing our work. That op-ed was written from that place of privilege to an intended audience of male St. Mark’s students, so it did not pause to acknowledge our own privilege in the matter as opposed to Hockaday but instead launched into a largely misogynistic and overdramatic harangue of a supposed “war on boys.” … Again, this op-ed is objectionable but it was created solely for the St. Mark’s community and our unique privileges play a large role in how we interpret the content, so it does not take into account at all the viewpoints of outside readers like y’all at Hockaday.

The Medium post is actually on point, for the most part. But that introductory caveat about privilege is quite something. Again, it seems to me like St. Mark’s instructors have a lot of opportunity to teach here.

Newsletter

Get a weekly recap in your inbox every Sunday of our best stories from the week plus a primer for the days ahead.

Find It

Search our directories for...

Dining

Dining

Bars

Bars

Events

Events

Attractions

Attractions

View All

View All

Comments

  • OldLakeHighlander

    Boys will be boys. Like when boys own sports teams, let their boys run rampant, and turn the organization into a sexually toxic atmosphere. The boy is hailed as a hero for grudgingly acknowledging his years of poor treatment of those under his employ. The boy then hires a girl to take all of the heat so that he has no consequences for his actions or inactions and all responsibility and accountability will fall only on the silly girl that took the job.

    That is the White Male Privilege that is taught day by day by the teachers and parents of St. Marks. The essay above is a perfect window into this mindset.

    • orange

      this has absolutely NOTHING to do with race. good points otherwise

      • Matthew Conley

        This is so far from true. The student’s argument is structured around boyhood being about getting away with mistakes. These are mistakes the white and often rich boys have always gotten away with and others haven’t. Being white leads to power, being male leads to power, power leads to privilege. This boy wants to keep being able to abuse his.

        • Anonymous

          I mean, if you believe that’s how it is. I’m a St. Mark’s student. I came from a public school in 9th grade. Nothing about this school screams privileged. In fact, I think many of the same opportunities that the author of this op-ed talks about are also discussing apply to all people – not white, not privileged. He is taking a phrase that people have become upset over and explained why boys being boys, making mistakes and learning, are just fine.

          • Anonymous

            Although I don’t support all of his points, I agree in that when cracking down on mysoginy and rape, society went from one extreme to the other. Anybody even suspected of being mysoginist is bullied and forced to be quiet for fear of it ruining their life. On another point, it is not actually super priveleged. There are indeed priveleged boys at St. Mark’s, but there are also people who made it in through sheer work and not their parents’ money. There are boys who need substantial financial aid just to barely make it and have as long as 1 hour commutes. The priveleged people do NOT represent the whole school.

          • Anonymous

            keep in mind privileged and hard working aren’t antonyms.

          • Anonymous

            If you go to a private school you are privileged. That’s what makes a private school a private school and not a public school. A private school being private makes the students who attend that school privileged students. What you mean to say is that there are people who aren’t rich who also attend the school. The private school in itself is a corporate body existing to promote itself as a place of privilege and better education. No amount of moxie or hard work can make a person who goes to private school unprivileged as you allege. What you are conveniently not saying is that people send their children to private schools so that they can receive better education THAN at public schools.

            The people who donate the most money to private schools are privileged people in the upper economic strata. These people can do things like, oh, I don’t know: offer to build the school a gymnasium in order to keep their son at school. These people can afford to influence the school by paying people like Ross Perot Sr. to drool on a microphone for half an hours as a commencement speech. The privileged people may not literally make up 100% of the school, but to deny that they influence the policy of the school is wrong. What I’m saying is that you’re wrong.

          • Rebecca

            This is not necessarily true. It would definitely be a privilege to get a good education and being provided with funds either through hard work or scholarships is still making that privilege possible. However, as a poor individual who went to a private university (very expensive one) I was not afforded the same privileges when I graduated. I had to work full time while I was in school, so I did not have the time or the ability to do internships or make connections with members of a wealthier class. I have many friends who have the same story. Graduate with the high class education, but then can’t get a job because we didn’t have the social connections to leverage. Many poor individuals think that just paying the money for the expensive education will put you into a place of influence, but it doesn’t. You still need to know what internships to get into, what courses of study will get you a job, etc. My parents had none of that. I have many minority friends with the same story.

          • Anonymous

            This is a dumb post. Arguing that a private school is not privileged is idiotic if not dangerous.

          • DreDre

            As an alumni of St. Mark’s who not only came from a neighborhood in Southeast Dallas that folks have repeatedly called “ghetto”, but also took public transit almost every day to school and witnessed firsthand the stark socioeconomic stratifications of my city as I made my way up North, I have to wholeheartedly disagree with your assessment that nothing about the school screams privilege. I don’t know your background, but I will say that the access to resources and education I received far surpassed what I would have gotten otherwise (and hell, even some of my college classes were easier). 98-99% College Admissions rate? Fully Stocked Labs?University Caliber educators? That’s privilege. St. Mark’s prides itself on developing young boys into men, and a huge part of that development is to make mistakes and actually learn from the consequences. There was no shortage of misogyny when I attended, and while folks were called out, many things were left unchecked. I don’t know if there are any developments on this from administration, but there’s gotta be a space where students engage with each other (and maybe some students from Hday?) On empathy and allyship. You can believe what you want, but it helps to expand your perspective and try to understand why folks disagree. (Full disclosure: written on a smartphone in Ethiopia so excuse the grammar) 👍

    • Anonymous

      this comment is ridiculously ignorant and wildly assumptive. St. Mark’s does not teach this at all – this is one of the few schools where political discussion is left out of the classroom unless in political theory, and political bias doesn’t play a part. This is the students’ independent opinion, and I believe his argument has validity, while we may disagree with his ideals.

      • Greg Brown

        I will amend my last statement to:

        That is the White Male Privilege that is taught day by day by the teachers and parents of privileged children everywhere in this world. The essay above is a perfect window into this mindset.

        • Anonymous

          again, not taught at all by SM teachers. this just happens to be one viewpoint, and the kid spokeout. Unlike at public schools, St. Mark’s encourages freedom of thought and it cultivates discussion and open-mindedness.

        • Free Speech

          This is a terribly ignorant comment. You have ZERO authority to libel a school that you don’t have a personal connection to. After attending the school for roughly a decade, I can say that SM represents minorities and underprivileged men just as much as any school. In my case, I’m a student of color and have never had to pay the full tuition because of financial aid. This shows the extent to which SM will go to accommodate students who are smart and hard-working, even if they’re not all “privileged” and “white.”

          • Anon

            Agreed, as a current student, I can affirm that St. Mark’s may have priveleged students, but it is represented more by the rest of the population. And for the record, Not a lot of students at St. Mark’s agree with the Remarker article.

          • disqus_qx3X6S5SC7

            “I can say that SM represents minorities and underprivileged men just as much as any school”. That is just flat out laughable, and I am the definition of what many would call a privileged, white male. Good grief. Look at the tuition and admissions page on the school’s website. Statistics covering acceptance rate and total applicants for financial aid are readily available elsewhere.

            https://www.smtexas.org/page/admission/tuition–financial-aid

    • Anonymous

      You are wrong on so many levels about what St. Mark’s represents. St. Mark’s is politically neutral, it’s one of the good things about the school – you are free to express whatever opinion you have about a class or a teacher’s viewpoints and dispute them. This is one student’s mindset – other students have others. To generalize that a whole school is full of bigoted white males because one student does not hold the same hard liberal guidelines as you is ridiculous. I cannot seriously believe you people are adults.

      • Zach

        I’m also a St. Mark’s grad. The faculty is politically nuetral-ish. There is a lot of room for health debate given, but St. Mark’s as an institution is anything but. It’s largely Old Dallas Money. Not many groups more politically conservative than that, and it certainly pervades an institution whose Headmaster is primarily a fundraiser….

        • Anonymous

          the past endowments come from old money. sure. but the student body is not old dallas. it’s a very healthy variation. in fact, the majority of SM body is diversified population.

      • AristotlesPencil

        Being politically neutral is actually epic and cool. I’m so politically neutral I’m defending a private school with an endowment of $140 million.

        • Anonymous

          not sure how political stance and money are remotely related.

          • AristotlesPencil

            Who you choose to defend is actually inherently political regardless of how much money is involved. Defending the institution of private schools is inherently political in that it is a reactionary position in which a person seeks to defend the right of private academic institutions to continue to exclude people based on wealth or perceived intelligence. There is no such thing as political neutrality.

  • topham

    You certainly have a bee in your bonnet when it comes to St. Mark’s.

    • I wondered how long it would take for someone to make that comment. I can see how it might seem that way. But that’s not the case, I assure you.

      I reported a few weeks back on a St. Mark’s matter (about a former teacher who sexually assaulted a student at his previous post). Then, when the school refused to answer questions from me and the DMN, I wrote another post. Was there a third post? Can’t recall.

      Anyway, if you think that as a result of those posts I didn’t hear from St. Mark’s alumni, some of whom had information that they thought was worthy of the public’s interest, then you’re wrong. I’ve become a clearinghouse for St. Mark’s material. It finds its way to me. Just as this op-ed did.

      No bees in this bonnet. Just a bunch of people sending me emails.

      • John Doe

        Hi, I think about ten years ago you made a post about how St. Mark’s students “lack common sense” (https://www.dmagazine.com/frontburner/2010/02/st-marks-students-demonstrate-lack-of-common-sense/) because they wear shorts when it’s cold outside. That is a tradition at our school. You ended that article by saying that Cistercian boys have “more sense” than we have and you end with “Go Hawks!” I think you have an inherent bias against St. Marks and I would like everyone reading this story to understand that. That said, very few of the students here actually agree with the opinion. There have been a few anonymous opinions sent out by St. Mark’s students: they are here (https://medium.com/@anonymous.smtexas/a-marksmans-response-to-the-op-ed-74b1191b7456) and here (https://txt.fyi/+/6a123068/). Please don’t generalize us.

        • Anonymous

          lol call him out. this guy is slandering st. mark’s and honestly has said a few false things. We call that libel in the professional journalistic community.

          • Kyle Reese

            Truth is an absolute defense to libel in the legal community. So where was the untrue thing said in the article? Not the comments, the article.

          • Anonymous

            He edited out some parts of it to when I first read this article, unsurprisingly, but even now there’s stuff like: ” article falls on the St. Mark’s faculty advisor who oversees the Remarker … what the Proud Boys are and why one wouldn’t want to align one’s beliefs with theirs.” His article states that the faculty approved of the article (untrue), then states that St. Mark’s faculty to not denounce the Proud Boys to its students (also untrue). Explicitly false.

        • John Doe, I was kidding about the pants thing. That should have been obvious. I mean, the post you refer to was about pants.

          But just so we are clear on something: we’ve got a guy in our office who is from Houston. Whenever the Mavs play the Rockets, he loves to talk smack about how much better his team is. Similarly, if given the opportunity, he’ll talk about how much better Houston is than Dallas. That doesn’t mean I can’t trust him to cover City Hall, which he sometimes does.

          Put another way: my bias in favor of long pants in cold weather doesn’t delegitimize what I’ve written here about the op-ed.

          • Anon

            If you are going to “talk smack,” do it to your friends, and not people who may take you seriously.

          • Anonymous

            Funny how when you are called out about your bias, and how you say St. Mark’s lacks common sense, you suddenly revert to you were joking. That is typical when you lack integrity in your supposedly unbiased intellectual privileged POV. As someone who grew up without the privilege of having enough to eat, let me tell you your accusations of privilege are more than sanctimonious and self righteous but rather just downright hypocritical. Maybe you should travel in more underprivileged circles rather than commenting on them from afar. You may, if you grew up in such circumstances under threat of drugs and violence, realize that boys will be boys and do feel rightfully threatened and it does not in any way represent misogyny and it certainly is not proof that you are a rapist. Your premise is ridiculous and your lack of intellectual integrity in saying you are joking is remarkable.

          • Anonymous

            Tim, buddy, but here’s a difference: while people can trust him to cover City Hall, we CANT trust you to cover St. Mark’s. Half of the things you have said in this article are libel and liable to a lawsuit. They are explicitly wrong, assumptive, and give the school a bad name. If we, at SM, covered cistercian and said, “cistercian is one of the worst schools academically in the whole nation” simply because of our own biases, would you remark that I’m a trustworthy source of cisterican?

          • disqus_qx3X6S5SC7

            There is quite literally zero chance that the author and/or DMagazine would ever be successfully sued over libel with respect to this article. That’s a ludicrous statement.

        • Kyle Reese

          Let’s not be sensitive.

      • topham

        Ok. Cool. Hook Em!

      • esse

        I think he is more referring to the fact that while the last story was a real story, this reads like an elementary school gossip column. If this was about an accounting scandal or some inappropriate relationship among the faculty, you could fall back on your excuse. I don’t see any criteria under which this is a real “Dallas” story. If this is a story about inter-school drama as the title implies it is, then why hasn’t D Magazine been covering this hard-hitting, gritty journalism angle, since, oh since edition one of the Remarker? This isn’t the first time an article at St. Marks irritated Hockaday or the reverse. How is this suddenly news now? It’s not.

        If this is about how surprising it is that boys from an all-boy school would write a “woe is me” article such as this, well that would be about as surprising as you announcing your support for Beto. Again, not news.

        If this was about how ridiculous the journalism at St. Marks is compared to D Magazine, well, you might have instead volunteered your time and experience as an advisor to the staff there. Surely they would welcome the mentoring.

        Or if it was indeed about how crappy the faculty advising is, surely a personal, and private, phone call would have been sufficient admonishment?

        (It certainly wasn’t about the underlying premise of the article referenced, because if it were, you would have actually addressed said points, however poorly and “ridiculously” they were made. It’s true, the case made wasn’t particularly robust, but your article was clearly about the people involved, not the topic of op-ed, just like any other “good” ad hominem based hit piece.)

        Since none of these explanations lend themselves to yielding a news article worthy of attention of this readership, the only explanation left is that maybe D Magazine really is just a glorified gossip rag. This comes across with about the charisma of LeBron James going to his old cross town rival high school, challenging the star player to one-on-one, and once done trouncing said player, thumping his chest in victory. Except to use “LeBron” as the example is too flattering–more like bench player on a professional team with a perennial losing record goes to rival high school, challenges random JV player…. In the end, due to the sad, pathetic dynamic, high school kid is elevated, professional is diminished. Just like here.

        And to bring this back round to the comment, the fact that there is no serious news topic here, makes this look like you just have a bee in your bonnet regarding St. Marks. Whether or not you have become a clearinghouse for all things St. Marks or not, that doesn’t make *this* a real story…well it might be a real story if it were printed in the ReMarks-a-Lot. I look forward to your next article about the lunch lady giving an extra slice of pizza to the football players…GASP!!!

    • Woodrow

      Tim is still bitter SM rejected him all those years ago. Cistercian is a fine school, no doubt, but it’s not even close to SM. Tim, you really need to get over your inferiority complex. Let ESD obsess about being the redheaded stepchild to SM.

  • Matthew

    Tim,

    I think it would be interesting if you dug a bit deeper into this accusation of the advisor. St. Mark’s has one of the best high school newspapers in the world (the winningest high school newspaper of all time in Columbia Scholastic Press Awards) largely due to that advisor. They have covered topics of gender identity, bullying, depression, and many other difficult themes at a remarkably professional level. Their advisor and the school’s leadership have always seen the newspaper as a place to generate discussion. Is this column reflective of serious issues of white male privilege and rape culture within the school? Without a doubt. Should this column have been censored? Debatably. This column has finally brought to light the severity of the problem St. Mark’s has needed to discuss for years. Alumni have called on them to fix it, and they never started (recall when St. Mark’s students were caught burning a copy of “We Should All Be Feminists” and the school did not react). I think this is an accusation directed at the wrong person. Blame those who allowed this boy to develop the mindset in the first place, not the one who let mindset come to light. St. Mark’s is finally talking.

    • Interesting notion, Matthew. In that case, I am happy to have shed an even brighter light on the terrible op-ed that finally got the conversation going.

      • Joe Bloe

        Well Tim you’re no Kurt Eichenwald. You’re getting eyeballs on the back of a 16 yr old. Nice.

  • golions

    Although this article was incredibly upsetting as a member of the Hockaday/St Mark’s community, there is some good coming from this article. In the past, when articles like this have been posted, there has been little to no outcry from within the St. Mark’s community. There may have been disgust in the community, but it was never made public. For once, there are members in the St. Mark’s community speaking out publicly saying, this is not us and we do not stand for this. These articles are a start and a step in the right direction. This could be an opportunity to either further your stereotype or to stop it. Balls in your court, lions.

  • Anonymous Person

    I am a student at St. Mark’s School of Texas. I would like to begin by saying I believe the attacks on the institution to which I accredit much of my academic and moral growth are unjust and rooted deeply in a desire to stir First and foremost, this is not a response to your piece, nor is it in defense of the authors writing.
    I, like many other students at my school, disagree completely with the message presented by the author of the column; however, I—alongside my Marksmen brothers—am appalled by the continual attacks on my school. The opinion of the author does not represent the foundation of our institution, nor does it represent the beliefs of our student body.
    Even the comment below me is one of ignorance: “That is the White Male Privilege that is taught day by day by the teachers and parents of St. Mark’s.”
    OldLakeHighlander, you are not alone in your views of St. Mark’s, but you are not correct.
    I have been taught respect and care by the faculty of St. Mark’s. In addition, you mention this “White Male Privilege” as a lesson passed down from parents to Marksmen. All I can say in response to this is how dare you. My teachers and parents both have raised me to be the kind of person this world seems to be lacking in this day and age. I know this response will be seen by few, but I hope those who do see it look upon St. Mark’s with more understanding.

    • Anonymous 2

      This world “in this day and age” is not lacking your voice. It is lacking the voice of women, people of color, others who have not benefitted from the enormous amount of privilege you’ve had throughout your life. If you truly wish to exemplify “respect and care,” please work on uplifting these voices instead of defending your own.

      • Anonymous Person

        I am defending the St. Mark’s community—a community filled with people of color and cultivated by women as well as men.

      • Anonymous

        Look — you cannot sit here and call SM students privileged if you have no idea what it’s like to be an SM student. I myself am a student of color – what gave you the notion that all SM is white? We have more non-whites than whites. All I see are accusations – what is your voice for the community? What voice have you brought, aside from the slander when OP here is stating his own personal discussionary opinion?

        • Anonymous

          Being a St. Mark’s student is being privileged and to deny that fact to whatever ends you want to deny it is to lie. Are you so naïve as to think that a diverse community is exonerated from privilege?

          • Anonymous

            Privilege (n.): “a special right or immunity granted or available only to a particular person or group of people.”
            What “special right” or “immunity” are we given? Please explain.

          • Anonymous

            The special right to better quality of education and greater educational opportunities than people who go to public school. It’s not hard to figure that out. You don’t have to pretend to be smarter than me because you own a dictionary.

      • Tiredofemotion

        Maybe the most absurd comment of the entire article. A student publishes a debatable op-ed piece, his institution comes under fire, the commenter defends his school and you tell him “If you truly wish to exemplify “respect and care,” please work on uplifting these voices instead of defending your own” Also, due to him publishing anonymously, you have zero idea of his race, yet you call him out. Wow, that is quite the leap considering SM is 45-50% minority.

        • Anonymous

          51% is minority, actually. so.

    • OldLakeHighlander

      I am glad that your parents taught you that the values expressed in this Op-Ed are abhorrent garbage.

      But Anon, you do understand that this Op-Ed was written by a St. Marks student and approved by a St. Marks faculty for publication in the Official Paper of St. Marks School. It IS, therefore, an accurate reflection of one student, one staff member and the editor of the school paper that such values merit publication and promotion. If this kid posted this on Facebook no one would care, but this is was published with the advise and consent of St. Marks staff. That is the difference

      • Anonymous

        Hi – just want to jump into the discussion. St. Mark’s, being one of the best institutions in the nation, is great for a reason – it encourages integrity, independent thinking, and discussion. An OPINION editorial is for expressing ideals for discussion – there is nothing that has to be approved. It is scholastically appropriate, and just because you disagree with it does not mean it should not be published. Censorship of discussion is only the staunching of knowledge. I am a St. Mark’s student, and the exposure to various opinions is what makes people independent-minded leaders – this publication is important, and censorship of this material would only lead to a negative impact on the development on students. The student’s opinion IS NOT a reflection of the faculty’s opinion – the faculty believes in the cultivation of discussion.

        Old, if you are a parent, should be ashamed of yourself for believing that faculty should oversee a 16-18 year old’s every action. If you censor it now, everybody lives in ignorance. The author of this op-ed remains very opinionated and people who oppose it also feel the same. If anybody is at blame, the people who read this and lose it without giving what the article writes about a second thought to what the op-ed says. While it takes the devil’s advocate, it does indeed, in my humble opinion, bring up valid points. I disagree with the author, but that does not mean his article is not intelligently written and does not bring thought.

        • Anonymous

          Please tell me how you are arguing that his article is intelligently written.

          • Anonymous

            It forms an argument based on his experiences, evidence, and allusions, structured through valid ideas inferred from this support. Now why is it not, just because it makes a point that is provocative? I may disagree with his political view, but that doesn’t mean he has made a valid point

          • Anonymous 3 I guess

            As a St. Mark’s student, I think the problem is his experiences and subsequent inferences come from a position of incredible privilege and reinforce false preconceptions of gender and identity.

          • Anonymous

            I would disagree – I think he brings up a very authentic view. I’m not sure why he mentioned recent political events, but I think what he is trying to address is that boys will be boys by making mistakes and trying again and learning, but people are speaking out against that. I think what the author of the op-ed is writing is genuine and applies to all.

          • Kyle Reese

            Ya but which lessons are they allowed to learn without consequences? Because by roping in Kavanaugh and sexual assault, it becomes more suspect. We’re not talking about sneaking out of the house or stealing a few beers.

          • Anonymous

            Obviously his Kavanaugh references were not related to the main overarching lesson and made the article politically biased in a strange manner. That being said, I think what the author refers to is that because it was lawfully decided that Kavanaugh did not perform sexual assault but only was accused for making an advance on a female, he is using a large, national incident to make of his view journalistically relevant (the event is current + large, the formula for journalistic relevance) that attempting (and failing) is being denounced in the nation.

  • Gengar from Pokemon

    Why don’t you point out out why it is so “terrible”? Unless there is no legitimate reason for it being terrible and you, like most reporters, report with a bias to create an uproar rather than to educate the public.

  • Anonymous

    If anyone would like a glimpse into another transgression by St. Mark’s boys or is still repeating the tired “not all St. Mark’s boys” argument, please read this article published in the Hockaday newspaper last year (and also note the quality/coherency in comparison to the aforementioned article).

    https://hockadayfourcast.org/dont-burn-a-book-by-its-cover/?fbclid=IwAR0Vi3-QzrkGeMe6mIwbdL9Vy0kCGd3eQVyp4XRfKnwsLSYMpUeDrwuvYq4

  • anonymous

    St. Mark’s > Cistercian

    • Anonymous

      Last time I checked, Cistercian does not give a platform to positions championing male privilege and hasn’t produced any white supremacist alumni like St. Marks has.

      • Anonymous

        last time i checked, cistercian wasn’t even in the top 200 private schools. St. Mark’s is number 6 and rising this next year. Must I go further? this year’s graduating class had an ACT average higher than that of Harvard’s. We had 70 /94 students National Merit Commended Nominees, meaning 75% of that class is in the top 1% academically. St. Mark’s has not had any white supremacist alumni. Richard Spencer is not an alumni at SM, according to the school. While he did take a few years at the school, he is not in any way affiliated with the school. St. Mark’s does not give platform to male privilege — where did you get that from? Aside from assumptions, I suggest you look at the facts.

        • DocInTexas

          Nice to know that academic “superiority” allows one to give platforms to championing male privilege and white supremacy. The post makes no reference to Cistercian academically being superior to St. Marks yet that is how you answer the statement that the platform for white male privilege is OK. St. Marks is smarter so our platforms are OK. Hmmmmm….don’t get out of the bubble much do you?

          • Anonymous

            my apologies, I incorrectly assumed you would know how to read even though you are not privileged and academically superior.

            “St. Mark’s has not had any white supremacist alumni. Richard Spencer is not an alumni at SM, according to the school. While he did take a few years at the school, he is not in any way affiliated with the school. St. Mark’s does not give platform to male privilege — where did you get that from? Aside from assumptions, I suggest you look at the facts.”

            if there’s any big words in here, maybe you can use a dictionary. sorry if you don’t know the meaning of suggest, i guess it’s just that coming from my white, supremacist, haughty, privileged, academically superior school, I assume people can process common verbatim.

          • DocInTexas

            Since the Remarker has more readers on any given day than Tim Rogers, I would say that is a school sponsored platform for this male privilege drivel that was published with school dollars and with the support of an academic supervisor. Sorry I’m so slow in understanding your vastly superior intellect. Can you please use monosyllabes in the future?

          • Anonymous

            The ReMarker is advertisement money based. It makes double what it costs to make in any given year through profits. It is supported by an advisor who teaches young students how to write journalistically – the publishing process is looked over completely by the student editor, who encourages free speech and opinion and does not censor anything unless it is wildly inappropriate, which SM students are not.

            it’s not monosyllables, and it’s written by a vastly superior, white, supremacist, haughty, academically arrogant student, but I hope it’ll do.

          • DocInTexas

            Hmmmmm, that’s interesting, so the Remarker pays for the space in which people meet to work on the magazine?The Remarker pays for electricity and the resources like the faculty adviser? The school doesn’t financially support the Remarker, it’s all paid through ads? Interesting. OK, I guess I’m wrong that the Remarker is not a St. Mark’s sponsored platform. Thank you for informing me. Also good to know you don’t find anything offensive in the article that was written in the Remarker.

          • Anonymous

            nothing was offensive. if you find that he let his political bias slightly slip into the article offensive, then I suggest you grow more open-minded. He accidentally shows that he is right-winged – however, he does not accuse anybody, make any statements on any political figures, or disrespect anything. somebody being a republican should not make you offended.

            also, you said “published with school dollars.” Publishing refers to the printing of the publication online and on paper. That is all ad-money funded. Publishing does not refer to electricity, rooms, or resources, but given how much money the ReMarker brings in, if needed, it could pay for the electricity, rooms, advisor, and all the other resources with plenty left.

          • DocInTexas

            You’re opinion that nothing was offensive in the article does not in fact make nothing offensive in the article. It just makes nothing offensive to you. Which is fine. You don’t have to agree with me. You don’t even have to acknowledge that I have a different opinion than you. That’s the beauty of America.

            I’m sure all publishing companies wish they didn’t have to pay electricity, rent and all those other resources. COGS is one of the main reasons print media struggles. But that said, you still haven’t convinced me that the Remarker isn’t a school sponsored activity.

          • Anonymous

            it is school approved, not school funded/overseen. the editor oversees the paper, and a room/electricity is not enough to trump the costs of the paper (it brings in 50k+, if i recall correctly, per issue, to ads).

            and sorry- I misworded. I meant to say nothing in the op-ed was inappropriate/politically incorrect.

        • Amy Patrick

          Mmm. Academic prominence doesn’t preclude the ability of some of the students to hold highly problematic viewpoints.

          Richard Spencer went to St. Mark’s and is absolutely an alumnus. I’m Hockaday ’00 and remember the guy. He was in the upper school production of Brigadoon. Where are you getting your information?

    • Anonymous

      Private schools are all equally bad in principle in that they are and have always been eugenics programs for privileged people, but other than that this is a good post.

      • Anonymous

        where did you get that? eugenics? over half of SM is minority. what does this have to do with race at all?

        • Anonymous

          Eugenics isn’t necessarily based along racial lines. Your assumption that it is is telling.

        • Anonymous

          What I should have said was that private schools are all basically equally unethical in that they make exclusive quality education that I believe should be afforded to everyone. Call me a snowflake or whatever you want. They aren’t eugenics programs. I went overboard. I was drunk. My b.

  • Anonymous

    If anyone would like a glimpse into another transgression by St. Mark’s (this incident went unpunished) or is still repeating the tired “not all St. Mark’s boys” argument, please read this article published in the Hockaday newspaper last year (and note the quality/coherence in comparison to the aforementioned article).

    https://hockadayfourcast.org/dont-burn-a-book-by-its-cover/?fbclid=IwAR0Vi3-QzrkGeMe6mIwbdL9Vy0kCGd3eQVyp4XRfKnwsLSYMpUeDrwuvYq4

    • I said that no one deserves to have her high school writing follow her around on the internet for the rest of her life. In Ali Hurst’s case, that’s not true. Her wise words serve her well. A really fine piece of writing—especially for a high schooler.

      • Anonymous

        and how about this piece of writing which is literally wrong, I think this might follow you around for a while bud

      • DocInTexas

        Wonderful piece of writing, especially in light of the Remarker drivel.

      • DocInTexas

        You should interview this girl and give her space and 100+ comments. That would be better use of D Magazine space than providing a platform for boys to demonstrate why they’re boys and not yet adults.

        • Anonymous

          “Hmmmmm….don’t get out of the bubble much do you?”
          “Too funny!! You’re just reinforcing her views.”
          “Cause all those nonSM alumni or nonSM students know about the rejection rate and can quote it in a comment section? Good one!”

          Saracastic ridicule is the way you have been arguing in these comments. You argue like Trump – no facts, no argument, no validity, just attacking the other person. Very “adult” of you yourself.
          I would say some of these 14-17 year old “boys” are indeed more adult than you.

          • DocInTexas

            Good call. I probably need to tone the sarcasm down. Just trying to keep up with the boys,
            ” it’s written by a vastly superior, white, supremacist, haughty, academically arrogant student, but I hope it’ll do.”
            You’re right though, “indeed more adult than” me.

  • Brett

    Tim, this is the worst fake news column I’ve ever seen. It’s terrible. It’s so terrible that I’m not going to bother pointing out precisely why it’s terrible. Because it’s obviously terrible. Best wishes. Don’t delete it this time fake news man

  • TakeABreath

    This is a contentious enough topic at the two schools (I have ties to both) and hardly needs to be aired in such a forum. The hollow “masking” of the writer belies your intention to stir the pot. The best, most lasting way for kids to learn from misplaced ideals is with the natural correction that comes from their peers – I don’t doubt the boy in question has received the message loud and clear. However, the school papers exist laudably so students can learn the value and reach of their words, and practice – dare I say it? – free speech. Thank God for unpopular opinions that make them examine their core beliefs. And even privileged youth have a right to err, learn, and grow without being publicly harangued.

    • Amy Patrick

      You can’t cry “free speech” and insist that authors of controversial opinions be isolated from the consequences of their words. Free speech doesn’t work that way.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t know what you learned at Cistercian, but you should realize that independent thought is one of the most important things for young growing boys to learn. This is that student’s independent thought, NOT the school’s opinion or the teacher’s opinion. In fact, this article is so inaccurate that it could debatably be libel. Half of the article is explicitly false, and you clearly have not done any journalistic research. I would recommend you watch what you write in a professional article, especially if you are going to make up information.

    • Independent thinking is no big deal. CRITICAL thinking is where it’s at. Big difference.

      • Anonymous

        and so, aside from the fact that your article is completely critical thinking, where does criticism come into play in White’s article? What does he criticize?

        Also – criticism and critical thinking aren’t the same thing. critical thinking is “the objective analysis and evaluation of an issue in order to form a judgment.”

  • Anonymous

    A ridiculous article in the D-Magazine, is apparently not going over well with anybody. The piece is titled “St. Mark’s Student Creates a Stir With ‘War on Boys’ Editorial.” Click here to read the whole thing, but here’s how it starts … I’d like to make two points about this article. Well, three. First, it’s terrible. It’s so terrible that I’m not going to bother pointing out precisely why it’s terrible. Because it’s obviously terrible.

    Second, no one should be forced to have his writing follow him around online for the rest of his life. That’s why I’ve obscured the man’s name, title, and face in the image of the article I’ve linked to above. I’m so thankful that the internet wasn’t invented until after I got out of college.

    Third — and this is the most important point — blame for this embarrassing article falls on the D-mag advisor who oversees the D-magazine.

    • Anonymous

      savage asf

  • MattL1

    Wow, the Markie Mafia is out in force today!

    They might want to just let it go. It’s not a good look.

    • Anonymous

      I’m sure most people thought your comment was so pointless and ridiculous that people didn’t even bother responding.

      • MattL1

        That’s not true at all. Stop lying.

        • Anonymous

          given that i’m the only reply and most other comments have multiple replies, i would say yeah..it’s probably true. Also, how can you say that “I’m sure” is untrue? How do you know what I’m sure of? Anyways, not gonna spend time responding because this is pointless and ridiculous.

          • Anon

            As a reluctant member of the SMT Mafia, I will offer my opinion that MattL1’s comment is very, very true.

            Just the same as all the other SMT Mafia comments on this thread, I am posting anonymously, because I don’t want this to come back on me. WP! But this all is, really plainly if you’ve any objectivity whatsoever, a bad look for the school.

            There are some easy lines of attack with T. Ridge’s article, background and obvious clickbait. But he did, in the end, have the cajones to post it under his name not “anon.”

            As for the rest of us… Our unwillingness to be publicly associated with the school or defense of the original OpEd tells you everything you need to know.

            Res ipsa loquitur.

          • disqus_qx3X6S5SC7

            …and yet, you responded twice. Good job.

  • anonymous 21

    Tim, I just finished reading some of your articles on the d magazine website. I noticed a pattern: you have a deep hatred for St. Mark’s. There must be something about that school that rubs you the wrong way. Is it their academic superiority? Their “white privilege”? Or did you apply and get denied so you had to settle for Cistercian? Next time you want to bash St. Mark’s for wearing shorts in the winter, remember that its a school tradition. Oh wait! you wouldn’t know that because you are too unintelligent and ignorant to get in to St. Mark’s. Next time you want to say they have white privilege, please remember that St. Mark’s actually has more people of color than white people enrolled. And finally, next time you feel like writing an ignorant and incoherent article, please consult your advisor because this was really terrible. It’s so terrible that I’m not going to bother pointing out precisely why it’s terrible. Because it’s obviously terrible.

    • Jason Yoo

      Sadly, I have to denounce this kind of argument. The majority of the student body does not purport to have “academic superiority” nor do they so openly criticize other schools. I don’t know who wrote this but please reconsider what you’re saying because this only proves the arguments of so many. Seriously, Tim might have a little bee in his bonnet for SM but this is not how we handle things.

    • Billy Lockhart

      I’m with Jason on this one. I might agree with some of the sentiment expressed, but this is taking it way too far. Being combative, on our part, will only show more ignorance than the article already did. At this point we need to play by strict rules, listen to opposition, and take advice. And even if we think he broke those rules, we should play by them. I believe that more of us than not have the class to do so. On behalf of St. Mark’s, Mr. Rogers, I sincerely apologize.

    • Anonymous

      Mr. Rogers, I want to, and I think most of the St. mark’s community would approve of this message, that we do not stand behind and support the personal attacks on yourself in this comment. While we may have a difference of opinion and even agree on some aspects of this conversation as a whole, I do not want this comment to be emblematic of St. Mark’s sentiment. This comment is rude and detracts from the actual conversation that’s happening. This is not what St. Mark’s supports. Please understand this.

    • Anonymous

      “Oh wait! you wouldn’t know that because you are too unintelligent and ignorant to get in to St. Mark’s. ”
      delete this and u have an epic argument bro

  • S. Holland Murphy

    This student backlash to the media backlash has ensured that I will never send my children to private school. In addition to toxic masculinity, St. Mark’s seems to have a problem with toxic loyalty to a BRAND. Good God, boys, your school is a tiny speck of dust in a great big world. Get out of your self-important bubble.

    • DFW Guy 01

      St. Mark’s acceptance rate is 1 in 6 applicants. Thus, not to be mean, but chances are your boys will have to go to your neighborhood public school regardless

      • DocInTexas

        Too funny!! You’re just reinforcing her views. “Thus, not to be mean.” Of course you’re trying to be mean insinuating that her boys are not smart enough to get into St. Marks.

        • Anonymous

          willing to bet @DFW Guy 01 doesn’t even go to SM. he’s just stating facts. there is a 84% chance her kids will be going not be going to st. mark’s. but keep believing the opposite if it supports your argument.

          • DocInTexas

            Cause all those nonSM alumni or nonSM students know about the rejection rate and can quote it in a comment section? Good one!

          • Anonymous

            i don’t know SM’s admission rate at all, and 99% of my friends don’t either. why would we? only a parent or perhaps somebody thinking of applying would know… which 7th grader applicant bothers himself with admission rates?

          • disqus_qx3X6S5SC7

            The admissions rate is 20%, which is plainly stated in several publications. Roughly 15% of the total student body submitted an application for financial aid. That percentage can be calculated using numbers found on St. Mark’s website.

  • 🤔

    Hockaday is not St. Mark’s sister school. Although many mistakenly believe it is. Perhaps it is time Hockaday clarify the fact that they are not aligned so closely with St. Mark’s.

    • Anonymous

      I’m sure you mean to make a statement here, but I attend to Hockaday and I can personally attest to an overwhelming inclusion of St. Mark’s in the majority of social events and other activities. I am active within many of our school’s drama programs and I met a multitude of St. Mark’s students in our many joint theater productions who I would be glad to call my friends. These guys are real people who genuinely care about me and the many others attending Hockaday. It’s unfair to lump one bad egg in with the plethora of kind-hearted boys at St. Mark’s, so please realize that this is not a fight between schools, but rather a fight against one man’s skewed column.

    • Anonymous

      SM is Hockaday’s sister school… that’s like saying Hockaday is not an all girls school. It’s a fact.

    • Just a dude

      As a former St. Marks student, I agree that our schools shouldn’t be connected in any way. The girls are unnattractive mentally and physically.

      • Amy Patrick

        Classy.

  • anon

    I’m not sure why y’all really care what this idiot thinks. He’s not respected in the journalistic world at all…in fact, he’s a pretty shitty guy. Check out that article to get a better sense of who Tim Rogers really is. Nobody likes him and that’s why he’s stuck over at D Magazine writing cute little things like this. I understand some people are excited because they think this is some “big time” coverage on their social media rants, but this really just isn’t blowing up. 98% of the people who will end up reading this crap will be St. Mark’s or Hockaday people anyways. Nobody will care in about a week and Tim Rogers will go back to being a lonely joke of a journalist. https://www.dallasobserver.com/news/d-magazine-editor-tim-rogers-should-have-taken-the-schutze-short-course-on-how-not-to-humiliate-yourself-as-a-journalist-6420554

    • AristotlesPencil

      Would you say that you’re not mad and that you’re actually laughing?

    • Matt Goodman

      Typically, I’m with the Pile On Tim At All Costs crowd, but the guy won a National Magazine Award working at a city magazine. That’s tough for a lonely joke of a journalist to pull off, which would actually make it that much more impressive a feat were it true.

  • PeterTx52

    “What ever happened to letting “boys be boys?” Take these two cases: In
    one, a seven-year-old boy was sent home for nibbling a Pop Tart into a
    gun. In another, a teacher was so alarmed by a picture drawn by a
    student (of a sword fight), that the boy’s parents were summoned in for a
    conference. In short, boys in America’s schools are routinely punished
    for being active, competitive, and restless. In other words, boys can no
    longer be boys. Christina Hoff Sommers, a scholar at the American
    Enterprise Institute, explains how we can change this.”
    https://youtu.be/OFpYj0E-yb4

  • Anonymous

    Mr. Rogers,
    As a member of the St. Mark’s community I would like to clarify that the “war on boys” article does not speak on behalf of the school. That said, the fact that you call yourself a journalist is unsettling. It is people like you who are the problem with journalism. You are bitter. You are biased. And you fail to present a single point that contributes towards constructive conversation or even simply reporting on the issue. Although you did not attend St. Mark’s and you clearly don’t hold the school in high regard, it is a shame that you find any and every chance to knock the institution (this is not your first attack). You are a joke. You should be ashamed of yourself.

    • MattL1

      At least he put his goddamn name on it, you coward.

      • Anonymous

        he’s being formal.

      • esse

        Right because with your profile picture of your eyebrows and ballcap and a name like MattL1, you TOTALLY aren’t obscuring your real identity here either, manly man. :rolls eyes:

        • MattL1

          It’s my real face and my real name. Not much more I can do.

    • DC

      “I would like to clarify that the “war on boys” article does not speak on behalf of the school.”

      Then goes on to behave in a manner consistent with said article, thereby confirming that the article does indeed speak for the school. You, sir, are a fucking moron.

  • Hi, I’m the (formerly) anonymous Marksman that wrote the Medium post. I’ve written a follow-up to discuss the uncalled-for furor that this article has begun at my school as well as to address some of the concerns that were had about my first piece. I would really appreciate it if you could give it a read:
    https://medium.com/@anonymous.smtexas/a-marksmans-response-part-2-d-magazine-anonymity-and-accountability-544e535dda6b
    Thank you.

    • Anonymous Lion

      I cannot access the link… can you please post it again?
      Thank you.

  • Anonymous

    I am a former student at St. Mark’s School of Texas, and I want to be the first to commend Tim Rogers on an outstanding and extremely valid article. I know most students disagree with my opinion, but I do believe this article does a good job of assessing the extent to which this article addresses the problems with not just the op-ed but also the institution in general.

    However, I do think that there’s an important point to add to this article, and that’s that the administration and the newspaper advisor should shoulder most of the blame. Although obviously the author of the op-ed can be faulted, it’s important to note that he’s young and may not have entirely understood how damaging his words were. The Remarker’s advisor and the St. Mark’s administration, however, DO, and I think that they absolutely should’ve known better by letting something like this run under the Remarker name.

    • Anonymous

      if you went to SM you should know that the Remarker does not censor anything in Opinion editorials. We believe everybody at the school is intelligent enough to make an appropriate article (which it is).

      • AristotlesPencil

        I think you’ll find that if you read the op-ed being discussed a few more times you’ll realize that isn’t true.

  • Jane Doe
    • LB76

      This article is very well thought out. More people need to hear this message in the comment section, that insulting others doesn’t do anything to help either cause. You extracted Wallace good points and emphasized his bad points. We need more of this type of commentary and to move away from targeted articles like these.

    • orangejpardon

      Exactly. This article encapsulates everything I was thinking. Tim, you are part of the same privilege problem that you criticize. Start thinking of the real solutions and it isn’t shitty clickbait.

    • Tiredofemotion

      The first calmly written, rational critique of the op-Ed piece. Well written young man. You could teach Mr. Rogers a think about writing a column.

  • DC

    The outrage in the comments does prove the author’s point about the issues of St. Marks. A lot of anon comments as well from well-heeled white men on their golden toilets in HP (in some cases, pretending to be students). But, no arguments of substance from that crowd. Just a lot of whining and political correctness.

    • Anonymous

      the author says that SM faculty promotes white male supremacy. now where in the comments have you seen that? i think you’ll be looking for a while.

      • DC

        Most of the comments.

        Additionally, from the comments, I gather that those debutante balls are quite rapey affairs. Of course, when you’re trotting out your daughter to say, “She’s ready to fuck”, which is basically what a debutante ball is, it’s no wonder this is how the rich think.

        Although, this also underscores how unremarkable the wealthy are. They are not moral, they are not intelligent, and they under-perform on most social metrics, except wealth and power.

  • EricCeleste

    /eatspopcorn.gif

    • Anonymous

      lol

  • Geoffry Stanbury

    Integrity is sexy just like writing. However, this writing is not sexy.

  • Assaultonboysv.real

    When discussing the Kavanaugh case with a mother of for boys, this mother expressed an opinion very much like the St. Mark’s boy’s.
    She said assault and rape are not what was described in hearings. Instead she saw it as young people trying to make Headway towards having sex. The encounter did not end in sex, or rape.
    To make her point crystal clear she shared that she had been molested by her uncle repeatedly when she was a girl. These encounters were assault and rape. She said characterizing boys attempts to get his first French kiss, or getting to second base, third base or more, is not rape or assault. When the girl says no and the boy stops pursuing his hormone-driven objective or love driven objective… it’s just boys being boys.
    What this mother and other mothers are concerned about is their Sons are open to being accused of attempted rape or sexual assault. The mother continued to explain that someone’s got to make the first move but these days the idea of the boy making the first move is completely changed from the way it was when she grew up.
    A boy’s persistent persual of getting further with a girlfriend has been happening forever . His advances may be declined but as the author says, boys will be boys. In all likelihood, the boy will ask or try again. He might be declined again but the next time he asks, the next time they are together , his girlfriend may be ready to take the next step. Does this sound familiar to anyone out there???
    Reality.
    What this molested and raped mother said is an attempt for physical contact is part of being a boy. It’s normal. Making Advance towards a girl is not rape or sexual assault.
    Because of her first-hand experience, I give her opinion full respect. It’s hers. The dialogue today and the accusations today of what is sexual assault is a Minefield for boys and young men. It’s scary for her as the mother of boys. I’ve heard this opinion from other mothers as well.
    So… There you go. This is how some people feel. probably a lot of people; particularly boys and young men and the parents of boys and young men. It’s a new paradigm and a new dialogue and it’s being discussed.
    Very few people have the balls to express such an opinion open late today. This mom did.

  • Dallas Writer

    Tim Rogers, your best-selling magazine every other year is “The Hundred Most Expensive Homes in Dallas.” Don’t act like you aren’t part of the “privilege” problem. Your work feeds our city’s worst impulses (consumerism, pretension, status obsession), and, if we’re talking white privilege, the only people of color you put on your covers are professional athletes.

    So let’s talk about why you really posted a link to a high school newspaper op-ed. You can say you did it because someone emailed you a link (a ridiculous defense; professional journalists don’t publish everything they get emailed), and you can say you did it to combat privilege in our city (a ridiculous defense; see above). Or you can be honest.

    You did it for the same reason you published the list of expensive homes, the same reason you published “Dallas’ Most Exclusive Private Clubs.” You did it for eyeballs. Yeah, a rich teenager said something dumb. It isn’t news, but you turned it into clickbait. Well done.

    • DC

      Eat the rich.

  • Kyle Reese

    This is the internet so of course the discussion is not about the content of the article. It’s either about blasting St. Mark’s and generalizing the student body or it’s about defending the institution to the hilt and grandstanding about the morals and values of St. Mark’s. The truth is probably closer to this – this kid’s parents watch Fox News and he coughed up that propaganda in an otherwise decent high school publication. And just for the record, no one likes the fact that the GOP managed to get Gorsuch appointed but no one ever accused him of rape and he didn’t talk about drinking beer to an idiotic extent. So, just like all institutions that teach rational thought and critical thinking, there are a few flunkies who fall thru the cracks. And I’m sure his rich daddy doesn’t care that he wrote these things.

    • Anonymous

      You pointed out some well said things, but I urge you to read the original piece. While he mentions Kavanaugh, he doesn’t actually support rape/assault and in fact doesn’t even make it a main point in his article. his article is about boys not being able to try again and again for fear of being called “headstrong” and the outcry on “boys being boys,” in the context of Kavanaugh, who tried to advance on a female. Nothing he said really shows right-winged propaganda and the article is in fact quite well written. The kid himself is probably biased to the right and let his opinion show a little in the piece, but it has nothing for the large part to do with any political viewpoint.

      • AristotlesPencil

        Are you kidding me?

  • Anonymous

    This guy peaked 6 years ago. Now he writes clickbait stories about rich dallasites. why do we care what his opinion is?

  • Anonymous

    how is this seriously an article in an actual paper?

    • Dallas Writer

      It’s not. It’s an op-ed by a 16 year-old in a high school paper. That 16 year-old has terrible views, but his words wouldn’t be polluting the world if an actual magazine website hadn’t posted them….

      • Anonymous

        no, i was asking how THIS d-mag article was a serious article…

      • Anonymous

        and also i can gaurantee 90% of fox eds are worse than this op-ed

  • WS

    I’d like to point out the fact that this is a private school. Your opinion that the faculty should learn from this simply exposes your ignorance. I attended this school for 10 years and am proud to have had the opportunity to do so. You sit behind your computer and make weak attempts to publicly shame a young man who is still in high school. That’s disturbing in itself. Where were your editors when you posted this garbage? Why is his use of the English language far superior to the rubbish that you’ve written? Is this article retribution for the way you were treated? You have to understand this if you’re so miserable from being bullied. You shouldn’t turn around and do the same to anyone else. What is truly remarkable is the fact that he knew that a group of second rate writers would do exactly what you have done. He baited you. In doing so, he has shown true courage. I fully agree with the points this young man has made. You, sir, are no man. You are a coward.

    • DC

      Meh, trolling score 2 out of 10. If you’re going to troll, learn to do it right.

  • Anonymous

    Private schools are functionally identical to eugenics programs and are uniformly bad. Thank you for attending to my TED Talk.

    • Anonymous

      evidence/any rhetorical support please? thanks.

      • Anonymous

        I’m good, actually. I was kind of drunk when I wrote that one, but I still basically think that private schools are a net negative for the rest of the population that is not selected to attend them. I’m not going to try to argue with you that I was right, because in asserting that they are literal eugenics programs I was wrong. I will, however, say that I think everyone should have access to a good education and that gatekeeping it by forcing people to pay for it is bad and dumb. A lot of arguments that I’ve seen in this comments section in particular attempt to make an argument that people who go to private school aren’t privileged because they aren’t rich or white. I would argue that in attending a school that most people cannot attend, whether they can’t afford it or aren’t deemed intelligent enough to go to said school, one is privileged. I do not believe that making good education exclusive is a good thing for the majority of Americans. I apologize for having previously said incendiary things. Have a nice day.

    • dallastx

      so….your argument is that because my parents want a better life for me and have the means to provide for my higher education, I am therefore involved in a eugenics program. Please support your claim with some evidence before you make a wildly untrue statement.

  • DFW Guy 01

    The “War on Boys” article that was published in St. Mark’s internal newspaper pretty much verified that the decision our family made to make a financial sacrifice to invest in our son’s education at St. Mark’s was the correct one. It is refreshing to see an institution that, in addition to providing world class education to its students, many of whom go on and continue their education at some of the top universities in the U.S. and abroad, it is also still open to different view points and does not let misinterpreted “political correctness” shut down those view points. In this day and age, this article would have probably never seen the light of day in many of our universities and colleges, not because there is anything wrong or controversial in its message, but because their faculty and administrators are too afraid of offending the misinterpreted “political correctness” and thought police. I’m proud of St. Mark’s and I’m proud of the fine young men that this school is sending every year to society!

    • JamieT

      I commend your standing by both your family’s decision as to where to educate him and your son himself in the face of D Magazine’s spuriously and collectively tarring him and his classmates as being infected with “toxic masculinity”, whatever that puerile psychobabble is even supposed to mean to literate adults.

      Add a second and separate commendation for not slavishly submitting to the “media backlash” as you were expected to.

      • DFW Guy 01

        Thank you. By the way, I would have written the same comment even if I had disagreed with the article. I think it is important for institutions like St. Mark’s to allow and celebrate diverse view points and not shut them down just because someone may not like them. Of course, view points that support bigotry, extremism, or calls for violence should not have a place in respectable institutions, but that’s not the case for the “War on Boys” article, which presents views that are perfectly legitimate for discussion. Let’s celebrate debate, not censorship.

  • Chanda Parbhoo

    I would like for everyone to read the entire paper and judge it on its merit. This paper receive accolades for the incredible work the students do. As any real news factual paper should do, it reported a serious issues. A few pages before the op-ed, was a full page discussion with Hockaday and St Marks input. They openly discuss the gaps and building bridges to healthy relationships. They published opinions from both schools. They realize there is work to be done and thats what journalist do – reveal the facts. The op-ed shed light on a perspective that may not be talked about, but exists. Its a fact and the paper chose to publish it, just as we would expect of any media outside of the bubble. The 16 and 17 year old editors are growing up in a world were the press is constantly being attacked or sugar coated to appeal to certain audiences. They cracked their bubble and opened a helpful discussion among families and students. Bravo St Marks

  • Ina world where ideology is king, it’s just a question of whose ideology is at play. Sectarian schools teach in the context of a religious ideology. Can’t say if it’s true or not for this school, but will students also have to be taught in a context of feminist ideology?

    Religion and feminism have a lot in common. Both require faith to believe things that either aren’t supported by facts or are actually contradictory to them. But unless this school’s religious ideology includes female supremacy and misandry, I have trouble seeing how the two will cohabit peacefully.

  • StanUlam

    God forbid boys/men/males in general try to fight the toxic feminist bigotry that pervades every corner of Western academe.

  • rabel

    Here is a brave young man giving anyone who is willing to LISTEN, a window into what being a boy in modern society is like. And lets face, he’s living it, not theorising it, and is the most reliable witness.
    It’s facinating to read the all these critical comments suggesting he has no right to think or feel the way he does. That he must be protected from his own experience of his world.
    It’s just unacceptable to acknowledge that his experience of this brave new world order that attempts to pathologise, deconstruct and reconstruct his masculinity in a feminist framework, is less than positive.
    I don’t think this young man will be embarrassed or ashamed of his article in the future, although he may the victim of some misandrist witch hunt.