The heat is coming to town. (Credit: New York Times)

Local News

It’s Not Just You; Dallas Really Is Getting Hotter

It's time to expect a lot more 90-degree days in our future.

Every year, it seems we get more days where the temperature sails above 90 degrees. This New York Times app basically confirms it, mapping historical data from the Climate Impact Lab that goes back to 1960. Compared to thirty years ago, North Texas gets an average of another dozen days above 90 degrees every year. And it’s only getting hotter.

Last year, we charted above 90 on 106 days. In 1987, we got to 92. Come 2067 we’re looking at 129. The warming is moving faster, too. Between 1960 and 1987, the region added six more days, which is about half of the increase we’re seeing now. Our baseline is also getting much warmer. We’re basically Houston in 1987 at this point—the city to our south had 105 days above 90 in 1987 and is now looking at around 118.

You may remember the Climate Impact Lab from the study its researchers issued in 2017, which analyzed the county-to-county changes in temperatures across the country. It wasn’t kind to Dallas County, to which it attached lower income, higher energy expenditures, and a higher mortality rate as byproducts of climate change here.

Also of note is The Times’ phrasing: “As the world warms because of human-induced climate change, most of us can expect to see more days when temperatures hit 90 degrees Fahrenheit or higher.” Tropical regions, like Jakarta and New Delhi, are already staring at half-a-year of above-90 days. They’ll be facing up to at least eight months of it by the end of the century.

Play around with the tool here. It may make you want to move to San Diego, an area “not prone to 90-degree days.” And maybe it’s time to ask our local meteorologists their thoughts on climate change again.

Newsletter

Get a weekly recap in your inbox every Sunday of our best stories from the week plus a primer for the days ahead.

Find It

Search our directories for...

Dining

Dining

Bars

Bars

Events

Events

Attractions

Attractions

View All

View All

Comments

  • Sam Merten

    The comma in the headline should be a semicolon.

    • Matt Goodman

      And they said comments are never helpful. Thanks for catching, Sam.

  • 1) Can’t get behind the paywall

    2) If it is using NOAA data, it’s unreliable, because NOAA keeps “adjusting” the raw data up with no clear explanation why (and often without even an acknowledgment that they “adjusted” it.)

    • The Milk Glut

      Donald Trump said NOAA is not real. So its not real. a

      • NOAA isnt on Trump’s radar.

        You can tell by how it still exists.

  • DubiousBrother

    It seems like we used to count the days over 100 to warn us how hot it is getting.

    Is there any way that you can add the population growth graph to your temperature graph?

    • The Milk Glut

      No one is smart enough. The added temperature and gas fumes makes it difficult for yall to think. So no. Thats not possible anymore. Good news is no one would understand your chart anyways. So go get in your car and go shopping.

  • The Milk Glut

    Donald Trump said Climate Change is not real. So its not real. Everyone is buying coal burning cars again. The only thing this article lacks is a look at air pollution in North Texas. Since adding all those oil and gas wells, the air pollution numbers have increased in an amount equal to that of all the cars sitting in the traffic.

    Point is, move. Get out. Go away. Far far away. DFW is a cess pool.

    • By coal burning cars, you mean like Teslas and Volts?

  • Kyle Reese

    There are ways to mitigate the urban heat island effect. Other cities have tried it. Our city – well, we can’t be effed to pave an effing road correctly so I don’t know why they would place incentives on big buildings having gardens or solar panels on top. Why would they put sun reflecting paint on the roads? Why would they make public transport or alternative transportation more viable?

    • DubiousBrother

      Who is they?

  • Alex Muse

    Reading through the comments, readers suggest that NOAA isn’t a good source of data. I do admit that they continue to adjust their temperature data upward in an effort to corroborate the data from their models, but their adjusted data is clear that temperatures in the U.S. and Dallas aren’t increasing at perceptible levels. If you think it is getting hotter in Dallas you’re simply fooling yourself. Turns out you can’t “feel” climate change as it occurs over hundreds of years. You can go through the data yourselves: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/datatools/records