o the Blizzard Arena in Los Angeles. Robert Paul/Blizzard Entertainment

Video Games

Gaming Has Become Serious Business in North Texas

Big names are making big bets on esports in North Texas.

Walking into Jason Lake’s temporary office feels a lot like walking into a boys’ college dormitory. Groups of guys in T-shirts, jeans, and baseball caps huddle together in a room completely consumed by the competitive games on their computer screens. Donning headsets, they swig Monster and snack on flavored chips, their eyes never leaving the screens.

“Do you want something to drink?” Lake asks as I sit down in the chair in front of his desk. Before I can answer he pipes up. “We have energy drinks and … actually I think all we have is energy drinks. Would you like one?” he laughs.

Then he settles in his black-and-red gamer’s chair and tells me all about how he built Complexity Gaming, a Frisco-based esports company. Complexity, backed by Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones and real estate developer John Goff, has gaming teams that compete across eight gaming titles and will soon occupy a 40,000 square-foot training facility at The Star in Frisco.

Complexity isn’t alone in betting on esports as a lucrative industry in North Texas. Esports has gained traction with folks like Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, the Texas Rangers’ Neil Leibman, and Team Envy—making the region a hotspot for esports. And, according to those involved in the local ecosystem, this is only the beginning.

Read more about the North Texas esports industry and what’s ahead in D CEO’s May cover story.

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