A state trooper stands guard by Dallas' Confederate War Memorial during a protest calling for the monument's removal Saturday. Photo by James Coreas.

Civics

History Demands That Dallas Tears Down Its Confederate War Memorial

Tomorrow the city council could vote to keep the monument and add "historical context" to offset negative connotations. That would be a mistake.

Tomorrow, the Dallas City Council will revisit the question of its Confederate monuments, months after a task force that deliberated the monuments’ history and significance recommended the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee from Oak Lawn Park in Uptown and the removal of the Confederate War Memorial adjacent to the Dallas Convention Center. City staff has suggested revising those recommendations, and so the council now has an opening – based mostly on pragmatic questions of cost – to backtrack on the task force’s recommendations, keep the Confederate monument, and turn the entire public process into a sham.

The process was already rushed and insufficient. Mayor Mike Rawlings called the task force in response to growing fear that the many Confederate monuments and statues scattered throughout the American South were becoming totems of a new white nationalist movement. In Charlottesville last year, lest we ever forget, one of these white supremacist/white nationalists drove his car into a crowd of protesters who supported the removal of that city’s Lee statue, murdering a young woman.

In Dallas, the Lee statue was hastily removed, but the larger Confederate memorial still stands. Now city staff suggests it should remain standing because it would be too expensive to move or dismantle. It suggests adding “historical context” to help sort out all the icky-ness of its associations with white nationalism.

If the city staff thinks historical context is sufficient to nullify the monument’s lingering import as a conveyer of another generation’s ideas about the South, Anglo-culture, the Civil War, and the interpretation of its legacy, well, here’s some historical context.

The Confederate Monument was dedicated in Dallas in the spring of 1897. In his book White Metropolis, Michael Phillips recounts how the 1890s were a critical period in the development of Dallas political history, a time in which the growing city’s power structure coalesced and its attitudes about race and segregation entrenched.

During the previous decades, the growing, industrializing city showed signs of a rising progressive movement, but Phillips writes how various populist and workers movements fizzled out, in part, “because of violence, intimidation, and the charge that it advocated ‘race mixing.’” A new power structure was establishing itself through the 1890s, and one of its principles was that Dallas was to be a segregated city. This rising political class would consolidate its power after the turn of the century by eliminating Dallas ward system of governance, forgoing neighborhood representation for a new commission comprised of what Phillips calls “the commercial elite.”

This system of government entrenched segregation, in part by redirecting municipal services. “White poor and working-class neighborhoods as well as black communities for years would lack basic services such as modern plumbing, electricity and trash collection,” Powers writes. In 1907, this commission “amended the city charter to impose racial segregation in schools, churches, and public amusement venues.”

Phillips’ book cites several city leaders and powerful businessmen who openly espoused their philosophical justifications for expanded segregation in Dallas, but one such character, Dallas attorney Lewis Meriwether Dabney, stands out:

Dabney urged other Dallas leaders to restrict immigration and eliminate the right to vote to all but the most “qualified” white men. Dabney’s comments came in the context of mass German and Jewish immigration into Dallas in the late nineteenth century, the arrival of Mexican Americans in large number between 1910 and 1930, and the development of a growing Sicilian community in the first three decades of the twentieth century. He blamed the growth of those communities on the Anglo-Saxons who created such a comfortable civilization that now even the racial dregs of the world thrived. ‘As society has advanced from the primitive to the semi-civilized . . . its functioning has been biologically adverse to the best strains and favorable to the worst,’ Dabney said in an address to the Dallas’ influential Critic Club in December 1922.

Dabney’s words – which also expressed fear of the rise of the “African Hottentot”  and the spread of “mongrelized Asiatics, Greeks, Leventines, Southern Italians, and sweepings of the Balkans, of Poland and of Russia” – are important to recount when we start to talk about historical context. His words embody a cultural feeling that was dominant in Dallas at the time of the erection of the Confederate memorial and flesh out the sentiment that led to its commissioning. It was a sentiment that extended beyond the desire to embed in stone a nostalgic, rosy eyed view of the Civil War; a honorific tribute to military bravery; or a resolute embrace of a bruised cultural heritage. The erection of the monument was a deeply felt and publicly proclaimed symbolic act that planted these cultural beliefs about race and society at the very center of Dallas’ political, cultural, and social identity at the turn of the 20th century.

The Confederate War Memorial was, like many of the Confederate monuments erected throughout the South at this time, an attempt to demonstrate that, despite having lost the Civil War, the slow march towards the dream of a segregated and pure Anglo-Saxon society was still very much a work in progress. It was a commemoration of a world in which white supremacy was such an integral and implicit part of the cultural outlook, the words “white supremacy” hardly needed to be uttered.

This was not the disposition of a handful of politically powerful local leaders who clung to Confederate nostalgia. The great enthusiasm for the mission represented by the monument was on full display during its commemoration, which is recounted in detail in John William Rogers’ The Lusty Texans of Dallas (1951). Even in the middle of the 20th century, in a city that was still segregated and still dominated by Jim Crow, Rogers’ wit sees through some of the ostentation and overblown enthusiasm of the event. In the interest of historic context, his recount is worth reprinting in detail:

In the spring of 1897, Dallas achieved such a monument. It was her first and was born of the urge that was sweeping America from New England to Texas to memorialize the brave soldiers of the War Between the States. The Dallas statue was erected through the efforts of the local chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy and in the ugly, stiff tradition of the time, it was no uglier than most such statues that were erected through the land – only characteristically more elaborate. Where most memorial committees contented themselves with a single shaft, Dallas not only had a tall central shaft surmounted by the figure of a private Confederate soldier, but around this also were four lesser columns on which stood the four leaders of the Confederacy – Lee, Davis, Jackson, an Johnston. Upon the base of the main column also was a medallion of the head of General William L. Cabell, Dallas’ own general. The main column was also adorned with what had been chosen as appropriate quotations carved in the stone – one of which is striking enough in its sentiment to be quoted here for it says:

THE CONFEDERATE SABREUR KISSED HIS BLADE HOMEWARD RIDING STRAIGHT ON INTO THE MOUTH OF HELL.

The statue was placed on the north end of the City Park where it stands today, and never in the history of the town except when the two steamboats tied up on the river at the foot of Main Street did it have such a celebration. No Southern general being available as visitors, the Daughters of the Confederacy invited as honor guests for the ceremony Jefferson Davis’ daughter, Mrs. Margaret Hayes and her two children, Lucy Hayes and Jefferson Davis Hayes. Also, the celebration drew Mrs. Jackson, widow of General “Stonewall” Jackson.

When the Hayes arrived from Denver at the Texas and Pacific Depot, gray-haired veterans unhitched the horses from the carriage that was to drive them to the Oriental Hotel and pulled the vehicle through the streets themselves. Floral tributes arrived for the honor guests from neighboring cities and that night at the Oriental, there was a reception and ball which [Beau Monde society reporter] Mrs. Fitzgerald termed “an affair of state.”

It was attended by 2000 people and introducing the honor guests in the reception line was Mrs. Katie Cabell Currie, daughter of General Cabell. Unfortunately, Mrs. “Stonewall” Jackson, worn out with her long railroad journey was too fatigued to attend. She spent the evening resting in the home of Judge Mutt Crawford where she was an house guest. But at the reception she was not forgotten. Let Mrs. Fitzgerald who saw it with her own sharp eyes describe the scene to you:

“The parlors where Mrs. Katie Cabell Currie, president of the Daughters of the Confederacy received hundreds of guests and introduced them to the guests of honor were beautiful in their spring adornment of roses, lilies, and pansies that shed their sweet southern fragrance from every niche and corner while palms and ivy vines growing lilies and smilax grouped the fireplace and festooned the draperies, mantels and chandeliers. Mrs. Currie garnered in a beautiful white organdy, garnered with white satin ribbon, chiffon, valenciennes lace, with diamonds flashing among the laces and in her dark hair, and a cluster of American Beauty roses in her hand, stood on the dais, laid with abig white angora rug and set with blooming Easter lilies and crimson roses, representing in their exquisite blooms the rpoud colors of the Daughters.

“By her side stood Mrs. Margaret Hayes, the regal looking daughter of the revered Jefferson Davis, in a Paris robe d’interieur  of gold colored satin brocade, with sodets outlined in woven pearls and finished with a rose ruche of blondine chiffon, that formed the décolleté bodice and a Pasha girdle, tied in front and dropping low in the petticoat in a rain of pearls. Exquisite old point lace and daffodils formed the garniture about the low neck, in which flashed a constellation of diamond stars – one seeming to have strayed to her dark tresses, where it twinkled just above her forehead on a beaten-gold bandeau. Mrs. Hayes favored the yellow rose of Texas in her bouquet and enshrined herself in the heart of Texas by the sweetness and graciousness of her manner.

“A vacant chair draped in the Confederate flag and decorated in lilies and jasmine set in state among the flowers for Mrs. Stonewall Jackson who was too ill to be present.”

The next day came the unveiling ceremonies which began with what Mrs. Fitzgerald calls without explaining it a “love feast,” at the auditorium and closed at City Park with oratory and the decoration of the monument with flowers. Thirty Thousand people were on hand at the park for the memorable day.

Why is it important to revisit this recount in all of its vivid detail? It’s not to celebrate Fitzgerald’s unquestionable stature as the greatest society reporter Dallas has ever known. It is to see in the pomp and circumstance of the dedication the true scale of symbolic import the monument had to the imagination of the city at a critical time in its history. At the very moment in which the worst aspects of Jim Crow apartheid were being solidified into the cultural and political norms of Dallas, the highest echelons of Dallas society – flanked by 30,000 ebullient citizens – participated in a communal ritual that sang loudly the true intention of the moment as a continuation of a dream of Anglo-dominance that they did not believe to have ended with the closing of the civil war.

It is impossible to read this account of the dedication – from the royal-like procession of Jefferson Davis’ widow’s soldier-borne carriage to the Confederate flag draped over Stonewall Jackson’s widow’s vacant chair at the gala – and not see the Confederate memorial as anything other than a declaration of the desire to advance a dying dream, a dream rooted in an implicit belief in white supremacy.

This may be a difficult idea for some people to swallow. There are a lot of people who grew up during the cultural revolution represented by the erection of the Confederate monument – the children of the Lost Cause Movement, who were raised in a time in which many of the myths the South told itself enshrined misconceptions about the true depths of inhumanity that underpinned nearly every aspect of its society by virtue of the legacy of slavery and its subsequent continuance through apartheid-like polices. This country has clearly not yet come to terms with the real legacy and lingering impact of slavery and segregation. That legacy must be confronted, and part of that confrontation involves breaking the nostalgic attachment to misconceptions of the American South that were part of the educational agenda of the Lost Cause movement. There is great richness and beauty in the cultural heritage of the South, but there is no need to hold on to the totems of the most abominable aspects of the South’s historical character.

This is the only historical context for the Confederate memorial that the city is now balking on removing from its continued place of prominence in Founders Cemetery adjacent to the Dallas Convention Center. The historical context is the full story of this city’s darkest and most despicable historical attitudes. It is a shameful history. It is the story of the waging of a second civil war, a battle that was fought not with guns, but through monumental symbols, cultural bullying, and legislation that enforced secretion and disenfranchised communities on racial grounds. It is the history that saw as many as 4,000 African-Americans murdered throughout the South by lynching, including W.R. Taylor, who was hanged by a mob in the Trinity River Bottoms in 1889, only a few years before the monument’s erection, and Allen Brooks, who would be lynched on Main St. a few years later in 1910.

How do you provide this historical context at the site of the Confederate Monument today? You can’t. Should the monument be preserved for history’s sake? Why? What historical value is there in preserving the statue other than paying heed to our nostalgic affinity for such a disgusting display of ignorance? There are better ways of telling this regrettable history to future generations. A photo of the Confederate monument and Fitzgerald’s florid description of its dedication would suffice.

No. The only way to unseat the triumphalism of the dream of a white dominated society that is written into the very aesthetic form of the moment is to tear it down, no matter the cost. That was the task force’s recommendation, and that is what the council should decide to do tomorrow.

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Comments

  • RompingWillyBilly

    The city and state of New York, a once loyalist territory that was in support of the British Crown, lost the American Revolutionary War to the American Patriots. In history, we are all 99.9% losers. Suffering should not have been given a black face. It is We the People who have suffered. How much so? Well, according to our dNa, the entire population of those living today are the offspring of 4% of those alive just 500 years ago. The rest died in wars, from disease, and starvation.
    So, please, quit with the blubbering pity party! Besides, as Texas is undeniably the greatest state of the Union today, so the heart and soul of the United States has become the south. If you want to sell wholesale change, go fix New York City, Boston, and Hollywood.

    • dallasmay

      “Well, according to our dNa, the entire population of those living today are the offspring of 4% of those alive just 500 years ago”
      *citation needed*

      • RompingWillyBilly

        I leaned about this incredible devastation in my philosophy of evolution class. My point is that if you are in it for the survival, you are in the wrong game.

  • Brian Cleveland

    Total BS. It’s history. It’s remembering the dead. This article is ridiculous condescension.

    • @zaccrain

      it’s not

      • JohnyAlamo

        Zac, that is a powerful and impressive retort that swiftly explains your view but I would counter that it is.

        • @zaccrain

          hm.

  • OxbowIncedent

    “How Do You Provide This Historical Context at the Site of the Confederate Monument Today?” You connect it to other works/institutions that hopefully show our advances away from that era such as the Freedmans cemetery, African-American Museum etc. “Should the monument be preserved for history’s sake? Why?” Because that’s what you do with historical works, no matter how uncomfortable they may be. It reminds us of our wretched roots and how we once were, and how so far we need to go. “What historical value is there in preserving the statue other than paying heed to our nostalgic affinity for such a disgusting display of ignorance?” To remind us that we are still ignorant in many other subtle ways that are not so bold as a large intricately decorated chunk of cement in downtown Dallas. “There are better ways of telling this regrettable history to future generations. A photo of the Confederate monument and Fitzgerald’s florid description of its dedication would suffice.” There is absolutely no way you can look at a picture of the Roman Coliseum and deduce that, “golly slavery sure was bad,” and then just turn the page. Standing underneath it and imagining human being getting flung off the top of it to mimic an ancient Greek myth of flying too close to the sun is a much more powerful connection to humanity’s history than a two-dimensional disposable image. Taking these Ozzymandian relics down and hiding them away in order to tidy up our difficult history so it doesn’t stand out so uncomfortably is a gross effort in ignorance, much more than having putting them up in the 1st place.

    • RompingWillyBilly

      The argument has always been that the ‘evil’ southern white man needs help raising his and her children. Being Christians who believe in Christ, we are backwards. Their solution? Teach us all how to behave proper like the Queen of England. Indeed, take us off the farm and ram us through as many college level cognitive science courses as possible. I say make the Queen share her throne for a change. What gives her the right to be so white and mighty! For now on, for every month on Queening she should take seven off cleaning and vacuuming.

      • @zaccrain

        hm.

    • JamieT

      Apart from enduring as the oldest trading post in America, Dallas will always be a soulless husk floating in its idealized eternal present, without any history at all because it simply cannot refrain from incessantly trying to edit and re-edit itself into what it feels might be the latest, best imitation of a “world class” coastal metropolis. Dallas is the Cindy Jackson of cities, her newest historical nip and tuck the transient neo-historical authenticity of the Bishop Arts District, which will be razed and replaced with something else in turn just as soon as its replacement can be invented.

      But it is arguable, given that eighty years and both Ron Kirk and the pugnaciously activist John Wiley Price never had much of a care about these statues, that this statuesque history of Dallas might be standing even now were it not for the efforts of capering twits like Mike Rawlings and Philip Kingston and others to put Dallas into the conjugal bed with the reptilian Jeff Bezos at any cost.

      Fortunately human sacrifice is not yet on the Amazon check list.

      (Bonus question: when it is added to the list, who should Dallas send as tributes to the altar?)

      • Happy Bennett

        Kingston was in full unhinged bloviating glory claiming that it was “insane” to keep these statues since people might not attend conventions in Dallas due to the (partial) retention of historical statues, or whatever…

        • JamieT

          The only reason people genuinely don’t attend conventions in cities is because of a dearth of affordable, quality prostitutes. Everything else is a case of third parties manipulating the city and its citizens as pawns in their covert power plays, a process KIngston is intimately familiar with.

          Were the political wind to whisper to Kingston (“Philip…Phi-liiip”) that the only thing standing between him and becoming Mayor of Dallas is the absence of the longest miniature golf course in Guinness down in the Trinity bottoms, he would be down there with a shovel, personally digging out the sand traps while a video crew recorded everything in 4K.

  • Lorlee Bartos

    Great article. I am always surprised and saddened by the arguments for keeping these reminders of a shameful past. And surprised and saddened at how prevalent those arguments are.

    • RompingWillyBilly

      Article? This is more of a blog. The run on sentences are ridiculous. Look, if you believe being an American is a matter of opinion, you are just on vacation along for the ride. The declaration of independence states clearly that “we hold these truths to be self evident.”
      See, you are thinking that it is okay for both the extremist liberals to destroy all the conservative art and, in turn, for the extremist conservatives to destroy all the liberal art. Between these two opinions though there is going to be nothing left in the middle. The lawyers in charge don’t care because they are going to get their cheesecake regardless.
      This is the classic fall of man and the reason so much of the city of Dallas exists in a shambles today.
      There is a subtle point that we just can’t seem to grasp. That the majority is a ruling wild animal is not a virtue, but a cruel fact of life. As the truth will set us free, it takes an intelligent few like our Founders to achieve this quest. In every instance, that is always going to require a reduction in the size of government.

    • PeterTx52

      so are you okay with a certain East Dallas HS being named after a racist segregationist? if not why not?

    • Happy Bennett

      Are you always “surprised and saddened” when you don’t get instantaneous gratification and other people disagree with you? None of this “bothered” you until a few months ago? Seriously? The article above is based on the wrong premise (I.e. “history DEMANDS”) History is what it is and doesn’t “demand” anything. There isn’t any country where history and historical figures aren’t somewhat controversial to someone.

      • JamieT

        The soft, moist totalitarianism of the no longer classical liberal.

        • Happy Bennett

          I am still wrapping my head around the “conjugal bed of the reptilian Jeff Bezos”–sounds like an Ed Woods low grade sci fi movie from the 1950s.

  • @zaccrain

    what

    • RompingWillyBilly

      He makes a good point, Bob. Dallas stands on thin ice. All those liberal wealthy kids now living in central Dallas are getting older and wiser. Meanwhile, Las Colinas is located a short ten miles away as an excellent alternative. If that isn’t a good option, West Plano – what Dallas use to be – is sitting pretty with a hard working diverse population, a black mayor, and a great school system to boot!
      We have bent over backwards being tolerant of their excuses. Forever now, they have been sinking south Dallas deep in poverty and crime. Enough is enough. We are the ones responsible for all our problems. No amount of social spending is ever going to change that.

      • @zaccrain

        ok

        • RompingWillyBilly

          To keep this intelligent discussion rolling, Zaccrain, the author of the above argument for ridding the city of historical art states that 4000 African Americans were once killed. What he doesn’t mention is how it would be safer today for African Americans to live in white racist neighborhoods than in their own African American neighborhoods. Indeed, from what they say, things haven’t gotten any better, but worse for African Americans. And, yet, as the majority of African Americans being murdered today are being killed by other African Americans, those committing the most murders are also African American.
          It is the truth that sets us free and not that side of the two party system best pimping the vast majority. While we always lose, whether they win or lose, those making up the two party system always make a fabulous living.

          • @zaccrain

            if you’re saying we need to do better by the black community, in dallas and elsewhere, then i agree.

          • RompingWillyBilly

            By the evidence, blacks need to do better by blacks. First, this involves turning down the empty box of goods they are being sold. All the billions making the minority equal has created even more crime and poverty. Whites have it better today because we don’t trust politicians. This philosophy has always equated to a necessary reduction in government. Put the real bums in office for a change! You know, that sort of thing. Unlike the lawyers, at least the real bums out on the street are worth shooting (Lets all bow our heads now and say a little prayer asking God for a price reduction in bullets).

          • alexander troup

            Good point keep working on it, the title of this story, it is really not in good taste…History, ……

            Should be the New Black City of Dallas Progress.. now there is the new history now…. …when all people are unable to read… And like all good slaves we have to watch….. like watch the Dallas Cowboys doing the same thing every year …. amazing Football in Dallas has no Hispanics or Asians….and we read the Spots pages every day like program. Daaa..

            Please History did not tear Down Dallas…Redneck Cracker Baptist D.N.A from Harpers Ferry 1859 did……I am Catholic and we have had a few lynched white people in our clan…so please tear down that awful statue of George Banner man Dealey and put up a statue to the founder..John Nealy Bryan…..

  • RompingWillyBilly

    Indeed, being a city official should be the easiest job in the world – strut pretty, squawk eloquently like a rooster, and pick up all the city’s trash as efficiently as possible. But no!! They just got to do something.
    Speaking of police officers, we should be concerned with how they are under attack. They stand in the way of those trying to usurp us of our freedom. They represent God’s grace and forgiveness. I was made aware of this while chatting with a cart pusher at Walmart. This happening right after hurricane Katrina, he had just returned from his uncle’s funeral. Violating curfew and holding a gun, his body had been riddled by hundreds of bullets not by the police but the national guard. These guard are the people and they don’t mess around. They solve the problem without mercy and without any regards to following any official regulations.

    • @zaccrain

      wait what

      • RompingWillyBilly

        Indeed, the police are our friends. However, I do see your point. It is odd how the police seem over protective of themselves while a fireman will give his life to save a dog. Great point! I’m going to give you an up vote!!

        • @zaccrain

          ok

  • JohnyAlamo

    Exactly. DPD is so understaffed that they can’t even prospectively patrol neighborhoods and can only just reflexively respond to 911 calls. The cost of taking the Lee statue down ($450,000) would pay for 10 more police officers. The much better option would be to let the public/private partnerships the city has engaged in, to raise funds and donations to put up new works that put the Confederate ones in context.

    • JamieT

      But that $450,000 protected the entire city from being killed and eaten by the Antifa who beat the living crap out of those larping nitwits with Tiki Torches in Charlottesville.

      Besides, this sort of thing isn’t normal police business anyway. If something even hints at becoming linked with potentially disturbing the public peace it must be removed, immediately, as if it were a cancer, lest it metastasize and infect the entire city with wrong thoughts and nonconformity.

      Half a million dollars of other people’s money is cheap proactive mayoral campaign optics if just one child is not killed and eaten here by imaginary monsters. Thank God for our 300 at the Pass, Mike Rawlings and Philip Kingston (sorry, Dwaine, everyone saw Kingston make you his bitch a long time ago).

    • PeterTx52

      trust me $450,000 is but the tip of the iceberg. Rawlings and the city manager have buried the true costs and neither the Dallas Morning News, Dallas Observer or D Magazine wish to dig for the true costs

      • JamieT

        Remember, Dallas is the city which, with the full-throated help of its media, allowed itself to be roped like a rube into studying putting a road in its river with its public funds for an entire human generation.

        I wouldn’t be surprised if the Wizard of Oz splashed down in City Hall plaza any day now looking for new pastures.

        • @zaccrain

          i mean, that would be actually surprising, to me

          • JamieT

            Excellent job pumping up the comment count on this post, Zac.

          • @zaccrain

            not sure what you’re referring to

          • JamieT

            hm.

          • JamieT

            ok

          • JamieT

            what

          • @zaccrain

            hm.

        • RompingWillyBilly

          Indeed, as they desired to put streets in a river that floods, now they want to remove a major artery downtown! Why? It is to get even with all those conservative suburbanites living in Plano!! There is a balance to life. Oh, you don’t want to divide neighborhoods, but you don’t want to combine them into one big communist society either. That already didn’t work in the Soviet Union.
          Look, just do the same thing already working for Woodall Rogers. And for cripes sake leave the suburanites alone!

      • @zaccrain

        ballpark the true costs for me

  • PeterTx52

    if history demands that these monuments come down then we must rename a certain East Dallas high school that is named after a rabid racist and segregationist. Please explain why we can’t? or shouldn’t

    • @zaccrain

      would be fine with that

  • RompingWillyBilly

    Slave owning black people along the Ivory Coast of Africa were the ones who put out signs advertising the exchange rate of twelve black souls for that of a single horse. They established factories that were like stockyards. The Portuguese shippers took advantage. Needless to say, those who purchased these poor souls valued them more than those who sold them.
    Aside from this, slavery happened in this part of Africa because of the fall of a civilization that originated in and around Timbuktu which was located in the state of Mali, Africa.
    By limiting our thinking to civilization populated by just a ruling master class and a slave class, we think in a dichotomy that is faulty and thus delusional. Outside of this master and slave relationship, another outcast class existed that both African master and slave were rejecting! In other words, these African people were being treated worse than slaves.
    Mary and Joseph, the mother and step father of Jesus, were outcasts. John the Baptist was another of these outcasts who got rejected fully by the Jewish marketplace. He had to live in a hole in the ground, wear camel skin, and eat wild honey and locusts. After speaking the truth as the world’s greatest preacher, this according to Jesus, after passing around a money plate, it was empty. Preachers today tell their congregation what they want to hear.
    Indeed, we are to blame as we want people to tell us what we want to hear. This is why we have ended up so cheated in history.

    • @zaccrain

      we should probably take down our monuments celebrating the slave owners of the ivory coast and portuguese shippers too, good point

      • RompingWillyBilly

        Okay, I’ll give you that! In every race riot, I can understand beating up these whites, these slave owners of the Ivory Coast, and these Portuguese. Such evil people and their offspring should be tormented forever. But why, pray tell, also beat up the Asians, the Hispanic people, and the Native Americans? What did they ever do? Peacefully assembling does have a self evident meaning, doesn’t it? It certainly doesn’t mean to kill every living thing that breaths including every tree with a white spots on it!

        • @zaccrain

          where are we right now

      • RompingWillyBilly

        Those slave owners were all black. They rose up under the influence of Islam. Timbuktu, Mali, Africa. Take away their culture and there won’t be anything left to celebrate. Most cultures are that way. My own culture was adopted. I am both Christian (Jewish) and Greek oriented.
        Extremists tend to concentrate on a specific history. For example, China has been trying to hide the fact that Eastern European white people were important in developing their ancient world. They even went so far as to dig up graves to steel the skulls of dead white people. They have gone into caves to scribble over images of white people.
        White slave owners valued the souls of their black slaves more than the previous black owners. The going rate of exchange was twelve human souls for a horse.

  • alexander troup

    You guys just don’t get it, your just like Scientology now all of you…. Ashamed of your behavior the way a Smart City is to look and be run now and you wont leave it alone, and having some old Yankee Liberal Roots I can say, you are really phony about this whole Southern Message that Dallas is so Southern.

    … It really lost is Southern thinking back in the 60’s.. And here is another thing you have to pick apart, …Well When will it all be Clear,,,and again get your facts are not correct, Lynching is a South Thing this is Dallas Texas where the South Ends and where Allen Brooks was the only Public Modern 20th Century Down Town Dallas on Akard Street Lynching….

    I should know George Cook who died in 2012 and gave his private collection to S.M.U since he wanted to corner the postcard market in 1998, payed me to work on the background of the Lynching Post Card in 1992 to 1994.,where a mad mob who came to Town drunk to see the First Areo plane flight in history,went to lynching of a Black man and 2 other black men who escaped to Ft Worth In Model T’s……. and Brooks was an aged man black who was drunk at the time he raped a little Girl…Yes rapped a little girl…are we Clear Scientology Dallas..Next story Slaves did not Burn Dallas Down in 1860…. Women did because their men folk did not have sex with them…

  • alexander troup

    The new Age Abolitionist as Michael Phillips has become…a glory seeker for fame and democratic injustice has made his mark well in this Century…forcing us to realise that narcissistic and the life cannot be helped or educated…just once idealistic formats to heal a nation is really a lie..opportunity today is self destructive and rewarding element of the moment as the New Club tells us what to think…I too grew up here and realized its multicultural history but not to inform people to become slaves of misinformation and history…Dallas Historical Reserach and recovery since 1979 and a Catholic.once Liberal and friend of all men who bare no malice or hidden mental illness. . Thank you D for another story the
    Misinformed need to know today.