Saturday, January 22, 2022 Jan 22, 2022
35° F Dallas, TX
Controversy

A Look at the Curious Board of the State Fair of Texas

The State Fair is a ways off, but it's never too early to start thinking about the three-week event that dominates the city's largest and most underutilized asset. Today, I have two thoughts. I'm happy to share them. First, you may have heard about the hubbub at the Wounded Warrior Project. The nonprofit fired its two top executives for overspending. In 2013, the Wounded Warrior Project had revenues of $342 million, and its CEO was paid $496,415 (.14 percent of revenue). The State Fair is also a nonprofit. In 2013 (the most recent year that Guidestar has its 990 form), it had revenues of $47 million, and its head honcho, the now-retired Errol McKoy, made $880,805 (1.87 percent of revenue). Two different nonprofits in two different industries. But still. It's something to think about. Second, I plotted the home addresses of the State Fair's board members on a Google map. Have a look. Click around. I couldn't help but notice that none of the folks live near Fair Park. Not that living in, say, Preston Hollow should preclude you from overseeing the three-week event that dominates the city's largest and most underutilized asset, which happens to be in South Dallas. But, again, still. It's something else to think about.
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Here's where the State Fair's board members live.
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A Look at the Curious Board of the State Fair of Texas

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Here's where the State Fair's board members live.
Here’s where the State Fair’s board members live.

The State Fair is a ways off, but it’s never too early to start thinking about the three-week event that dominates the city’s largest and most underutilized asset. Today, I have two thoughts. I’m happy to share them.

First, you may have heard about the hubbub at the Wounded Warrior Project. The nonprofit fired its two top executives for overspending. In 2013, the Wounded Warrior Project had revenues of $342 million, and its CEO was paid $496,415 (.14 percent of revenue). The State Fair is also a nonprofit. In 2013 (the most recent year that Guidestar has its 990 form), it had revenues of $47 million, and its head honcho, the now-retired Errol McKoy, made $880,805 (1.87 percent of revenue). Two different nonprofits in two different industries. But still. It’s something to think about.

Second, I plotted the home addresses of the State Fair’s board members on a Google map. Have a look. Click around. I couldn’t help but notice that none of the folks live near Fair Park. Not that living in, say, Preston Hollow should preclude you from overseeing the three-week event that dominates the city’s largest and most underutilized asset, which happens to be in South Dallas. But, again, still. It’s something else to think about.