Houston Press Publishes Story That UT Southwestern Probably Didn’t Enjoy

Yesterday the Houston Press published an interesting story about a high-profile society couple that left town in March under strange circumstances and moved to Dallas. Beth and Jess Moore had amassed a mountain of debt, and they ran a cancer-fighting nonprofit whose finances raise lots of questions. I can only imagine that the folks at UT Southwestern wish the Press had published its story before the organization hired Beth to be the director of development for cancer programs.

Newsletter

Get a weekly recap in your inbox every Sunday of our best stories from the week plus a primer for the days ahead.

Find It

Search our directories for...

Dining

Dining

Bars

Bars

Events

Events

Attractions

Attractions

View All

View All

Comments

  • Eric Foster

    Hey they protect Kern Wildenthal, why not a freelance faux 1%?

  • Charles Mann

    People often forget that all charities are businesses, and all businesses exist to make money. What charities do with their money is supposed to be defined by their mission statements. But in reality those mission statements are frequently ignored. Charities these days are big business, and much in need of closer oversight. But because of the “social connections”, that oversight can be hard to come by. The rich use charities for various purposes: sometimes it’s purely for vanity, sometimes for connections, and sometimes it’s for tax purposes. But as far as the public is concerned, charities only exist to throw parties, because that’s where they really earn their money.

    • billholston

      that may be true for some Charities, but there are so many small non profits working so hard with employees earning well below market salaries for social good. A good solid board of directors is the best protection against abuse. And many small non profits have conscientious Boards.

  • John O’Neill

    “…amassed a mountain of debt, and they ran a cancer-fighting nonprofit whose finances raise lots of questions.”

    How do you amass debt running a tax free “non-profit” scam? The Komen Foundation points and laughs.

  • elena34

    Unfortunately, this thing happens all of the time. The social aspect always comes into play, and lots of people give money and resources to organizations that they think are doing good.

    This clearly illustrates the all too common situation of the self-serving opportunists that take advantage of people’s generosity.