Coalition Forms to Fight Smoking Ban Expansion, Maybe Smoke Some Smokes

Facing what I’d have to classify as long odds, a justice league that includes the Amusement & Music Operators of Texas, Americans for Prosperity, and the Greater Dallas Bar & Tavern Coalition has formed to fight the proposal to expand the smoking ban to bars. You’ll get your first taste tomorrow at 2 p.m. at a press conference at Victory Plaza. Spoiler alert: “The coalition will release the results of a survey conducted in April 2008 that shows a significant majority of Dallas citizens are satisfied with the current smoking ordinance and do not believe any further restrictions are necessary.” I’ll say what I always do in these situations: “Yippee ki-yay, Mr. Falcon.”

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Comments

4 responses to “Coalition Forms to Fight Smoking Ban Expansion, Maybe Smoke Some Smokes”

  1. jamesn says:

    Other than for brief periods in the spring in odd numbered years, since when as the Dallas City Council cared what the citizens of Dallas think? Excepting certain individuals, of course, but I’m referring to the body as a whole.

    I’m offering odds on whether or not the convention center hotel is going to, at some point before it opens, get it’s own, somewhat more liberal, smoking ordinance. Takers?

  2. Kent Amick says:

    We probably wouldn’t have smoking bans in the U.S. or in Europe if Senator Thomas Bliley’s testimony about his Oversight Committee’s investigation into the EPA had received media coverage… but it didn’t, so the fraud continues.

    The public would realize that the alleged danger of secondhand smoke was a fraud perpetrated by anti-smoking activists working within the U.S. government as EPA employees.

    By 1986, the EPA had been deeply infiltrated by them.

    Sen. Bliley’s testimony completely outlines the Committee’s two-year investigation, and the fraud that was uncovered. And there’s still no media coverage even now because the media was conned into being a blind spokesman for the fraud — media must protect itself from the appearance of guilt by association.

    Media honesty dies a quick death.

    http://www.pipes.org/Articles/Bliley.html

  3. Mark Gulledge says:

    While I do not agree with the ban on constitutional grounds, that article posted does not hold much weight considering who he is and who pays his salary. A senator from the home state of the largest tobacco industry in the country and a man having received over $100,000 in campaign funds from Phillip Morris probably has secondary motives having nothing to do with safety.
    However a private business should have the right to decide whether to allow smoking or not. There is no basis in the constitution for allowing such a law. The slippery slope we are creating here will come to haunt us 1000 times over.

  4. sean riederer says:

    Hi I was wondering do you have any of the forms to protest the smoking ban that can be used in mass hand out kind of situation.