A close-up look at Desta's injera landscape. Kevin Marple

Eat This Now!

A Few Takeout Options We’re Eating This Week

Tangy Ethiopian injera on Greenville Ave. Caribbean jerk chicken at the Dallas Farmers Market. Smoky barbecue in South Dallas.

This is a time to support Black-owned businesses, even as we support all businesses in a restaurant industry that has been rocked by the pandemic. To compile this week’s list, with takeout top of mind as we continue to ease our way into a world of both in-room and takeout dining, my mind went to all the spots that have made my mouth water and my soul feed nourished.

We made a big list of Black-owned food and drink businesses, but should that feel a little daunting, here are a few favorites plucked from the list for now. Support them. And as you eat, feel the care that goes into every dish you take home tonight or that sends you off into the weekend.

Caribbean Cabana

Yoland and Robert Plaza run Caribbean Cabana, a Trinidadian stand in the Dallas Farmers Market. The most important thing is the doubles, two puffy disks of quickly fried dough that sandwich a mound of chickpea curry. Pinch with your fingers. Devour. But from her small window where tickets hang on clothespins—she designed the stand to look like a beach shack—Yoland serves up equally good fare from the hearty to the snackable: bright yellow, turmeric-rich curry or jerk chicken with plenty of heat; sides of rice and pigeon peas, smashed and fried tostones, or slices of macaroni pie. Shrimp curry is cooked to order, and the goat curry and oxtail routinely sell out. Also try roti, a tear-apart crêpe with ground split peas folded in; and fry-bake, a soft puff of fried dough, like an enormous jelly doughnut. All Trini street food par excellence. Counterservice for takeout. Currently closing before 4 p.m. under curfew. 920 S Harwood St., 972-707-8131

Desta Ethiopian Restaurant

Nestled into a shopping strip that houses a food goods store where you can also buy injera to take home afterwards, Desta serves it lavishly. The circle of spongy teff, with its multitude of air bubbles, soaks up the sauces from dishes that use butter liberally and marry it with rich Berbere spice and other house spice blends that make the dishes stirring. Try the chicken and hard-cooked egg of doro wat in a lush sauce of long broken-down tomatoes, onions, and ginger that resembles a rust-colored sunset. The smooth shiro of rosy lentils is comforting. As are gingery cabbage and onion and collard greens (gomen) that can compose part of the beautiful kaleidoscope of a sampler platter. Leftovers are fabulous, the flavors melding even more next-day. Takeout. 12101 Greenville Ave., Ste. 105. 214-575-9004

Off the Bone

Dwight Harvey, a South Dallas native, and his wife Rose opened their barbecue joint in 2008, and their Cedars restaurant is a place to pick up brisket that’s moist, with a dark crust and good, strong smoky flavor. Rose is behind much of the menu, but the Harvey’s son-in-law is pitmaster. You’ll find pulled pork, tender and well-seasoned; baby back ribs, a little sticky with sweet sauce and chili seasonings; and brisket chopped and folded into tacos. (Given the current curfew, you should pick these up for lunch.) I covet the deep-fried corn, plunged in the fryer to order, the golden-crisped kernels sprinkled with chile salt and lime; and charro beans in a soupy broth with lots of fresh cilantro and smoky flavor from barbecue trimmings that remind me what a simple pleasure charro beans can be. For dessert, Rose’s pecan pie is silky as you please. Takeout. 1734 S Lamar St., 214-565-9551

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