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Commercial Real Estate

Developers Behind The Statler Purchase Cabana Motor Hotel with Plans for Redevelopment

The hotel once patronized by Jimi Hendrix and The Beatles will be renovated by Centurion American Development Group.
By Julia Bunch |
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Centurion American Development Group has purchased the former Cabana Motor Hotel in the Design District for $8.1 million. Centurion American just reopened The Statler, a historic hotel redevelopment in downtown Dallas.

The former Cabana Motor Hotel at 899 Stemmons Fwy. in Dallas has 357 rooms over 10 floors. The hotel was formerly owned by Doris Day and patronized by Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, and Richard Nixon. In the 1980s, Dallas County purchased the building and turned it into a jail. Though there was talk of Lincoln Property Co. buying the building in 2014 to turn it into a data center, the sale ultimately never happened.

Centurion American plans to renovate the hotel and build an adjacent high-rise apartment building with construction starting in May or June of 2018, the Dallas Morning News reports.

Centurion American purchased the hotel from Dallas County. CBRE’s John Alvarado, Peter Jansen, and Stan McClure, and OMS Strategic Advisors’ Lawrence Gardner, arranged the transaction on behalf of the county.

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