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Things to Do in Dallas

The 25 Things You Must Do In Dallas This January

Shake off your holiday hangover and start 2016 off right.
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Shake off your holiday hangover and start 2016 off right with Janet Jackson, Romeo and Juliet, and Ryan Bingham.

Music
Janet Jackson
Jan. 24, 6:30 pm
With last year’s Unbreakable, Janet Jackson triumphantly came back after a decade of cold-shouldering from the media following her infamous Super Bowl performance. She reunited with Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, the songwriting-production team that made her (more) famous, and returned to the music everyone fell in love with in the ’80s and ’90s. Her world tour promoting the album promises all of her dance-pop classics—no short list—as well as fresh hits for the more recent converts. And she is still capable of surprises: audience members might hear a political appeal or witness a guest appearance from beyond the grave. Miss Jackson is back to reclaim her throne. American Airlines Center, 2500 Victory Ave. Editor’s note: This tour was postponed.

Theater/Dance
BODYTRAFFIC
Jan. 22, 8 pm
This dance company is known for commissioning work from the most innovative contemporary choreographers operating today. It’s a costly policy but a brilliant one. Every BODYTRAFFIC performance is, by its very nature, cutting edge. The Los Angeles troupe makes its Dallas debut on this North American tour. Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St.

Music
Yefim Bronfman
Jan. 19, 7:30 pm
Philip Roth once wrote that this Soviet-born, Israeli-American virtuoso is built more like someone who moves a piano rather than someone who plays it. Roth was remarking on Bronfman’s powerhouse physical style, a passionate, blood-on-the-keys intensity that’s made the pianist one of the most acclaimed soloists in the world. Bass Performance Hall, 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth.

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Theater/Dance
If/Then
Jan. 27–31
This Broadway musical answers the eternal question “What if?” by having it both ways. If/Then follows Elizabeth through two parallel timelines that diverge after her move back to New York. Idina Menzel starred in the original production, but Dallas will have to settle for a new cast. Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St.

Museums/Galleries
Black Sheep Feminism: The Art of Sexual Politics
Jan. 16–March
The artists in this exhibition were left largely on the outskirts of the mainstream feminist movement in the latter half of the 20th century, mainly because of their work’s exploration of radical political and sexual themes. This boundary-pushing erotic work is now getting the attention it deserves. The Dallas Contemporary, 161 Glass St.

Anita Steckel. Detail of New York Landscape (Woman pressing finger down), 1970-1980. Courtesy Estate of Anita Steckel and the Suzanne Geiss Company, New York.
Anita Steckel. Detail of New York Landscape (Woman pressing finger down), 1970-1980. Courtesy Estate of Anita Steckel and the Suzanne Geiss Company, New York.

Theater/Dance
Romeo and Juliet
Jan. 27–Feb. 28
Somehow a story this well-known still has the capacity to enthrall and even surprise. West Side Story and, more recently, Baz Luhrmann proved that Shakespeare’s tale of star-crossed lovers is endlessly adaptable. The Dallas Theater Center, which bills this as a “sleek, sexy new production,” continues in a grand tradition. Kalita Humphreys Theater, 3636 Turtle Creek Blvd.

Museums/Galleries
Vermeer Suite
Jan. 17–Aug. 21
The 17th-century Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer’s Young Woman Seated at a Virginal, which depicts a woman playing a keyboard instrument at a desk, was used as a launching pad for a full exhibition of other artists’ pieces featuring instruments from the same period. With about eight pieces in the exhibition, you’re looking at a full band. Dallas Museum of Art,  1717 N. Harwood St.

Happenings
Howard Kremer
Jan. 22, 7 pm
Kremer, who got his big break on MTV’s Austin Stories, has distinguished himself as a comedian who can happily dabble in hip-hop. His alter ego is a rapper by the name of Dragon Boy Suede. He’s also a big promoter of the concept of “summah,” a celebration of the joys and warmth of the season that should be particularly welcome in the frozen (well, relatively) pits of January. Three Links, 2704 Elm St.

Theater/Dance
Clarkston
Through Jan. 31
William Clark helped explore the uncharted American West, blazing through the wilderness with Capt. Meriwether Lewis to establish a trail that, today, sits near a Costco in this world-premiere play by MacArthur Foundation Fellow Samuel D. Hunter. With the Wyly’s intimate Studio Theatre turned into the warehouse store, Clarkston follows two listless employees on their own adventure. Studio Theatre at Wyly Theatre, 2400 Flora St.

Music
Dave Rawlings Machine
Jan. 8, 7 pm
Rawlings has spent much of his career as a clutch behind-the-scenes Nashville guy, his distinctive flatpicked guitar sound (and his opinions on the tracklists of Morrissey albums) appearing on records by the likes of Gillian Welch, Ryan Adams, and Old Crow Medicine Show. With the traditional country and bluegrass of the Dave Rawlings Machine, he has proven himself just as comfortable at center stage. Majestic Theatre, 1925 Elm St.

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Theater/Dance
Martyr
Jan. 13–Feb. 6
A teen turns to the Bible’s more inflammatory passages—the wrathful fire-and-brimstone, pillar-of-salt Old Testament stuff—for comfort when the violent confusion of puberty threatens to overwhelm him. This newfound fundamentalism puts him at odds with several concerned adults who, in this work from Marius von Mayenburg, one of Germany’s most acclaimed playwrights, must decide when religious belief becomes dangerous fanaticism. Bryant Hall at Kalita Humphreys Theater Campus, 3636 Turtle Creek Blvd.

Museums/Galleries
FOCUS: Glenn Kaino
Jan. 12–Apr. 17
Kaino’s conceptual work is often influenced by his political thoughts, perhaps most obviously in 2014, when he built an installation out of rocks collected from protest sites around the world. Whatever is on his mind, the artist’s best pieces—including an installation of more than 100 suspended arrows converging on one point—provoke plenty of ideas from viewers. Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth.

Happenings
Janeane Garofalo
Jan. 11, 7 pm
Garofalo is outspoken, funny, and versatile, with roles on a number of beloved shows and a stint as a radio host (not to mention her activism) padding out an illustrious career as a stand-up. Basically, she’s everything you want from a comedian. Garofalo’s back on our screens in the Netflix resuscitation of Wet Hot American Summer, and she never left the stage. Granada Theater, 3524 Greenville Ave.

Theater/Dance
Slave Letters
Jan. 28–Feb. 14
This world-premiere piece includes staged readings of letters written by slaves in the United States and performances of spirituals from the same time period. Taken together, the show shines a light on the pain and hope of the people who suffered under this country’s founding injustice. Stone Cottage Theatre at Addison Theatre Centre, 15650 Addison Rd., Addison.

Bireswar Sen (1887-1974), Wordless Persuasion, Watercolor on paper, 2.5 X 3.7 inches, Courtesy Bireswar Sen Family Trust
Bireswar Sen (1887-1974), Wordless Persuasion, Watercolor on paper, 2.5 X 3.7 inches, Courtesy Bireswar Sen Family Trust

Museums/Galleries
Time and Eternity: Landscape Paintings by Bireswar Sen
Jan. 24–Apr. 25
The Indian artist worked small—of the 60 watercolors in this exhibition, none measures larger than 4 by 4 inches—but dreamed big, painting evocative landscapes that captured the breathtaking beauty of his environment. Some of his most impressive work depicts the Himalayas, whose size and majesty resonate even on a reduced scale. Crow Collection of Asian Art, 2010 Flora St.

Theater/Dance
Sexy Laundry
Through Jan. 31
An unhappily married couple works to bring some new sizzle to their union with a stay at a ritzy hotel in this sitcom-style play, which will see its Fort Worth debut after enjoying two successful runs at WaterTower Theatre last year. Stage West, 821 W. Vickery Blvd., Fort Worth.

Happenings
Kathleen Madigan
Jan. 23, 8 pm
Early in her professional career, Madigan worked as a newspaper reporter in St. Louis. Then, like many newspaper reporters, she
realized there was less stress and better money doing almost anything else—even stand-up comedy. The comic, a winner of the American Comedy Award, has been making audiences laugh for 25 years and counting. Majestic Theatre, 1925 Elm St.

Theater/Dance
Saturday Night, Sunday Morning
Jan. 22 & 23
Al Green went from singing soul to saving souls when he turned his back on his hedonistic, R&B-star lifestyle and became an ordained pastor in the late 1970s. It’s the biopic version of a “sin on Saturday, church on Sunday” weekly routine, which is explored in this one-man performance about Green’s life. Clarence Muse Cafe Theatre at the Black Academy of Arts and Letters, 1309 Canton St.

Music
The Midnight Stroll
Jan. 8, 7 pm
Aaron Behrens, the spark-plug frontman of the Austin electro outfit Ghostland Observatory, is branching out on his own with this project, which sounds like a more rollicking, guitar-heavy incarnation of his other band. The Midnight Stroll may be an even better fit for Behrens’ very Texan vocal inflections. Trees, 2709 Elm St.

Theater/Dance
Oil
Jan. 21–Feb. 14
One of Houston’s most outlandish oil families—imagine a more bizarre version of Dallas’ Ewings—are bracing for a barbecue planned by sickly, scheming matriarch Magritte Holes. A combination of whiskey and desperation sets the stage for a comeback attempt for the Holes dynasty, which has dug itself into an untenable situation. Theatre Three, 2800 Routh St., Ste. 168.

Music
Mozart’s Symphony No. 39 and Overture to The Magic Flute
Jan. 29–31
The world premiere of a piece by distinguished composer Jeremy Gill is just the cherry on top of a program that includes two of Mozart’s most spirited compositions—Symphony No. 39 and his overture to The Magic Flute—and Poulenc’s Concerto for Two Pianos. Meyerson Symphony Center, 2301 Flora St.

Theater/Dance
Shaping Sound
Jan. 27, 7:30 pm
These dancers dazzled so much in appearances on So You Think You Can Dance? and Dancing With the Stars that they earned their own behind-the-scenes reality TV show in 2012, Oxygen’s All the Right Moves. Their star power still shines the brightest when they’re doing what they do best: dancing. Bass Performance Hall, 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth.

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Music
Vaughan Williams Fantasia
Jan. 14–16
Vaughan Williams’ most famous orchestral piece is, at its core, a reworking of a 16th-century hymnal, and the work is notable for linking the tunes of the English Renaissance with Williams’ “national music” of the early 20th century. But Fantasia really takes off and earns its esteemed reputation in the romantic flourishes the composer adds. Meyerson Symphony Center, 2301 Flora St.

Theater/Dance
Twelfth Night
Jan. 17 & 18
One of Shakespeare’s funniest works has more gender-bending twists and turns than The Kinks’ song “Lola.” These staged readings of the comedy are the latest in a five-year  project to perform every single one of the Bard’s plays. Hamon Hall at the Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St.

Music
Ryan Bingham
Jan. 23, 6 pm
Bingham’s breakout song (co-written with T Bone Burnett) was “The Weary Kind,” which appeared in the 2009 movie Crazy Heart and won its writers an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe. The success didn’t go to Bingham’s head, and his sound—a little bit country, a little bit rock and roll—is still refreshingly old-fashioned and genuine. Billy Bob’s, 2520 Rodeo Plaza, Fort Worth.

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