Texas Ballet Theater Cuts Performances, Pay

Despite the ballet finding the popular spotlight with the success of the movie Black Swan, the art form is still struggling to find audiences in Dallas-Fort Worth. The Texas Ballet Theater, which is celebrating its 50th year, announced it would cut dancers’ pay by 5.7 percent and will cancel four June performances of Don Quixote at the Winspear Opera House as “’pre-emptive’ financial move.” From the Star-Telegram:

McCann said the downsizing was at least partially connected to the scrapping of the March 5 Ballet Gala benefit in Dallas, which faced competition from two large charity events the same day and sold just 200 tickets, which began at $500. Some patrons requested refunds and others attended a performance at the company’s Fort Worth studio, she said.

Still, she said the regional dance company was in relatively good shape — considering what arts groups across the recession-hit nation have been experiencing — ending the 2010-11 fiscal year on June 30 with no red ink. The company is considering a reduction of dates at expensive venues like the Winspear and Bass Hall, and performing at less expensive facilities next season, she said.

It is that last bit that I find curious and potentially troubling: that the new facilities that have been built to house the North Texas arts are too expensive for struggling, if laudable performance arts companies to use. That is not a good sign.

Newsletter

Never miss out on arts and entertainment events in Dallas with our FrontRow newsletter.

Find It

Search our directories for...

Dining

Dining

Bars

Bars

Events

Events

Attractions

Attractions

View All

View All

Comments

  • Lemastre

    Apparently, a certain segment of Dallas still doesn’t understand that struggling theater groups (that’s probably redundant) not only can’t afford, but actually don’t need, big auditoriums or entirely state-of-the-art stage equipment and union stagehands. In the 1970s or 80s, when theater groups were seeking out empty storefronts or old gas stations to perform in, I contacted all the local foundations and others who financed theatrical activities about building or converting a space to contain three small auditoriums, plus common lobby, scenery, costume, and publicity shops for use by small groups. No one was interested, and some acted as though I was totally ignorant by not realizing that the Majestic Theater and McFarlin auditorium, as well as a space in the convention facility were available for rent.