For many years, this homey, bright yellow dining room was the place where business folks, politicians, and power brokers met for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Gradually it fell out of favor, and the kitchen went through a rough patch, including too many chef changes to count. Last November, the restaurant closed for a total renovation. It reopened in February. Executive chef Mike Pacheco’s New American-meets-Texas cuisine is as modern and sexy as the new decor. Pacheco’s family owns a cattle ranch, and he is no stranger to sourcing regional products. The mixed greens were so fresh that the earthy, just-picked flavor of the leaves would have been reason enough to abandon dressing. Pacheco plays it light: just a touch of balsamic-maple vinaigrette is tossed with goat cheese, Gala apple, and cherry tomatoes. He clogged our arteries with a bowl of burrata fondue. The buttery Italian cheese is whipped with herbs, cream, and olive oil and melted into a thick dip. We dipped into the hot cheese with crusty slices of grilled bread and scooped out the somewhat stringy cheese. I’ve never seen melted burrata on a menu in Dallas. I know I will meet up with this bowl again. Entrées were lovely but not inspired. The portabella-and-porcini-stuffed ravioli, with squash, zucchini, and carrots, was swimming in an unimaginative broth with a hint of lemon grass. Pan-seared striped bass finished in the oven was flaky and moist, but the accompanying Chinese black rice was salty. Service is friendly and efficient, and even though the decor is fancy, the staff is charming.

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