No forks. Use this as an excuse to get more familiar with your brisket on a primal level rather than a reason to struggle with spoons and knives as many diners insist on doing. The restaurant doesn’t offer barbecue sauce either. The folks here claim it’s an homage to the sacred smoked meat temples of Central Texas, and although the owners have offered blanket amnesty to those who insist on smuggling in their own bottles, there’s no need. Tender and smoky Black Angus brisket slices with a layer of beautifully rendered fat cap demand to be consumed, salty fat and all, without forks or sauce. Unfamiliar to Dallasites is the beef clod, which is a shoulder cut rich in intramuscular fat. Slicing to order is an art form here, with a behemoth Bewley smoker painted fire engine red as a backdrop to the carving show. Use the slicer’s proximity to your advantage to secure those blackened end cuts of beef clod. Pork ribs have been tough on several visits and the thick-cut pork chop can range from succulent to spongy. Chicken is also forgettable. All-beef sausages (original or jalapeño cheese) are imported from Kreuz Market four hours away in Lockhart; they hold the post-oak smoke well and have snappy casings that barely contain the moist, well-seasoned meat. Pay attention to daily specials that include smoked fish, prime rib, sausage, and hearty beef ribs—all with plenty of napkins for your greasy fingers.

For more information on Lockhart Smokehouse, visit our restaurant guide.

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