Time was, the Super Bowl meant folks would show up in Miami, watch two teams beat the snuff out of each other, then cobble together some coins for a flight home. But after owners threw some roofs on a few stadiums, mayors realized they could hitch their wagons to a new stadium’s star, host a Super Bowl, and pump more than $$600 million into the local economy. (Bart Starr, eat your heart out.)

On Feb. 6, Arlington will host Super Bowl XLV at Cowboys Stadium, marking the first time the big game has ever been played in North Texas. Here’s what we can expect:

More than 15,000 visitors will descend on the Dallas-Fort Worth area during Super Bowl week.

4,500 media credentials will be issued.

(Journalists from 21 countries visited south Florida to cover Super Bowl XLIV.)

As of Nov. 18, tickets on StubHub for the 2011 Super Bowl ranged from $1,963 to $305,580 (that’s for a suite). Ticket prices for the first Super Bowl went  for $6 to $12.

Last year, the average out-of-town visitor to Super Bowl XLIV spent $401.44 per day on accommodations, meals and beverages, local transportation, entertainment and recreation, merchandise and miscellaneous retail. That same visitor spent an average of 3.12 nights in south Florida while visiting.

Demographically, 72.1 percent of Super Bowl XLIV visitors were male, the average age was 41, 43.9 percent completed college, 30.5 percent completed graduate school, and the average household income was $220,323.

During Super Bowl XLIV, 83.3 percent of nearby south Florida businesses hired temporary employees.

The direct economic impact in south Florida from hosting the 2010 Super Bowl is estimated at $141.4 million. The direct and indirect economic impact for North Texas from hosting the 2011 matchup is projected to top $611 million.

SOURCES: North Texas Super Bowl XLV Host Committee, Dallas Convention & Visitors Bureau, South Florida Super Bowl Host Committee 2010, Marketing Information Masters